Latest news of the domain name industry

Recent Posts

Complaints over 50% .uk price hike

Kevin Murphy, November 27, 2015, Domain Registries

.uk registrars are petitioning Nominet to complain about plans to increase the price of a .uk domain name by up to 50%.

The registry announced the price increase, which will come into effect March 1 next year, on Wednesday.

A one-year registration will go up to £3.75 ($5.65) wholesale, still cheaper than any gTLD I can think of.

Currently, Nominet charges £3.50 for a one-year reg and £2.50 per year for multi-year registrations.

The company heavily hinted, in an email, that some of this extra cash will wind up in registrars’ pockets, due to promotional spending:

Our new pricing strategy aims to accomplish three things. Firstly, as with any business the price we charge is linked to our ability to deliver a fantastic service. Secondly, we want to invest in the .UK namespace to ensure we can differentiate over the long-term. Thirdly, we want to be able to invest in marketing and promotions in order to secure prominence at point of sale – which our current pricing levels cannot support.

The price of a .uk domain has not increased since 1999, Nominet said.

Increasing the price from a posh coffee to a London beer is presumably not a big deal for most registrants, but domainer-registrars are unhappy.

Andrew Bennett of Netistrar has set up a web site at to call for “outraged” registrants and Nominet members to voice their opposition to the changes.

The site points out that Nominet has said it will review its pricing annually.

It calls on Nominet to have a three-month public consultation then a member vote before introducing the changes.

At time of publication, 77 registrants and 47 Nominet members have signed the petition.

On its web site, Nominet lists 2,048 members.

Comment Tagged: , , ,

Bladel romps home in ICANN election re-run

Kevin Murphy, November 24, 2015, Domain Policy

Go Daddy VP of policy James Bladel has been elected chair of ICANN’s Generic Names Supporting Organization Council.

The result came a month after the GNSO Council embarrassingly failed to elect a chair to replace outgoing Jonathan Robinson.

This time Bladel ran unopposed, securing the unanimous support of both his own Contracted Parties House and the Non-Contracted Parties House, which did not field a candidate.

In the October vote, the NCPH had nominated academic Heather Forrest.

Due to personal friction between commercial and non-commercial NCPH Council members, Bladel lost that election to “none of the above” by a single vote.

Forrest has been elected vice-chair, along with Neustar’s Donna Austin.

Volker Greimann and David Cake, who had been running the Council on an interim basis for the last month, have stepped aside.

Comment Tagged: , , ,

Verisign warns about Chinese .com boom

Kevin Murphy, November 24, 2015, Domain Registries

Verisign has warned investors that the current boom in .com sales is largely coming from Chinese domainers and may not be sustainable.

The company has added an unprecedented 4.1 million domain in .com and .net so far during the fourth quarter.

“While there continues to be demand for domain names globally, the recent increased volume for Verisign’s top level domains, as well as top level domains of other registries, during the fourth quarter is coming largely through registrars in China,” the company said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing.

It listed several factors that are likely responsible for the sudden uptick, but warned that renewal rates are typically not great.

In the past, Verisign has discussed many factors that affect the demand for domain names, including, but not limited to economic, social, and regulatory conditions, Internet adoption, Internet penetration, and increasing e-commerce. In addition to these factors affecting demand, Verisign is also evaluating additional potential factors unique to China that may also be responsible for the recent increased volume of new registrations in China.

In no particular order, these potential factors, or combination of factors, could include, but may not be limited to, government initiatives in China to develop their online economy such as ‘Internet Plus;’ registry and registrar regulatory requirements; cultural influences such as the popularity of numeric domain names; increasing competition amongst Chinese registrars; potential increases in domain name investment activity; and recent capital markets volatility and access to capital in China.

Verisign cannot predict if or how long this increased pace of gross additions will continue and we cannot at this time predict what the renewal rate for these domain names will be. Verisign has noted in the past that renewal rates for domain names registered in emerging markets, such as China, have historically been lower than those registered in more developed markets.

It’s difficult to imagine that Chinese investors have managed to find four million unregistered domains worth keeping.

There are currently 123,497,852 domains in the .com zone file, according to Verisign’s web site.

Verisign is not the only registry that appears to be benefiting from a deluge of registrations from China. has seen over 440,000 domains added to its .xyz zone file in the last three weeks, bringing its total to over 1.5 million, which appear to be largely coming through Chinese registrars.

1 Comment Tagged: , , , , ,

Verisign v XYZ judge confirms both companies suck

Kevin Murphy, November 21, 2015, Domain Registries

Verisign and have both come out of a US lawsuit looking like scumbags.

Explaining his dismissal of Verisign’s false advertising lawsuit against .xyz registry, Virginia judge Claude Hilton today said that’s statements about its registration numbers were “verifiably true”.

At the same time, he confirmed that they came about as a result of a bullshit deal with Network Solutions to bolster .xyz’s launch numbers.

The judge’s ruling confirms for the first time the financial details of the deal between XYZ and (Network Solutions) that saw .xyz’s registration volume rocket in its first few weeks of general availability. He wrote: purchased 375,000 domain names for a price of $8 each totaling $3 million dollars. In exchange, XYZ purchased advertising from in the form of 1,000 impressions for $10 each, at a total cost of $3 million dollars. Instead of cash exchanging hands, advertising credit was given to XYZ and the .xyz domain names were given to, who subsequently gave them away as free trials to their subscribers.

In other words, XYZ bought $10,000 of advertising for $3 million and paid for it with $3 million of free .xyz domains — 375,000 of them.

That bogus deal enabled XYZ to report big reg volume numbers without actually, legally, lying,

“The statements regarding Defendants’ revenue and number of registrations are statements of fact that are verifiably true,” the judge wrote.

When the Defendants [] stated they were a market leader in new TLD’s and that they had the most new registrations than any other TLD, they were basing that information off of an accurate zone file. Further, the zone file confirms that there are over 120 million .com registrations and one {1) million .xyz registrations. These statements are also true.

The judge said he was dismissing the suit not just because XYZ wasn’t lying, but also because Verisign couldn’t show that it had been harmed.

The number of .com registrations has actually been going up, he noted.

Much of Verisign’s complaint centered on this ad:

Verisign said the ad lied about the availability of .com domains, which XYZ denied.

The judge said:

The video posted to YouTube is puffery and opinion. It displays no actual domain names, and communicates a subjective measure of value and superiority, not capable of being proven false.

“Puffery” is a term with legal weight in false advertising cases under US law. It basically means that advertisers are allowed to exaggerate. XYZ had in fact used the “puffery” defense.

The judge seems to have relied heavily on zone file analysis to reach his conclusions. He wrote.

according to Plaintiff’s [Verisign’s] own data, .com names are largely unavailable. In a given month, Plaintiff reports that it receives about two (2) billion requests to register <.com> domain names, yet fewer than three (3) million are actually registered.

I believe that “two billion” number refers to how many “attempted adds” Verisign gets every month for .com domains, as reported in its monthly reports with ICANN.

That number would include every automated attempt to register a dropping domain by every registrar.

It’s not a reflection of how many actual human beings attempt and fail to register .com domains and, in my view, it’s worrying that the judge took it to mean that.

In summary, the lawsuit managed to unearth the dirty reality behind XYZ’s launch “success”, whilst also making Verisign look like a petty, petulant, child.

Everybody loses.

Except the lawyers, obviously, who have been paid millions.

10 Comments Tagged: , , , ,

ICANN reveals 12 more data breaches

Kevin Murphy, November 20, 2015, Domain Registries

Twelve more new gTLD applicants have been found to have exploited a glitch in ICANN’s new gTLD portal to view fellow applicants’ data.

ICANN said last night that it has determined that all 12 access incidents were “inadvertent” and did not disclose personally identifiable information.

The revelation follows an investigation that started in April this year.

ICANN said in a statement:

in addition to the previous disclosures, 12 user credentials were used to access contact information from eight registry operators. Based on the information collected during the investigation it appears that contact information for registry operators was accessed inadvertently. ICANN also concluded that the exposed registry contact information does not appear to contain sensitive personally identifiable information. Each of the affected parties has been notified of the data exposure.

The glitch in question was a misconfiguration of a portal used by gTLD applicants to file and view their documents.

It was possible to use the portal’s search function to view attachments belonging to other applicants, including competing applicants for the same string.

Donuts said in June that the prices it was willing to pay at auction for gTLD string could have been inferred from the compromised data.

ICANN told compromised users in May that the only incidents of non-accidental data access could be traced to the account of Dirk Krischenowski, CEO of dotBerlin.

Krischenowski has denied any wrongdoing.

ICANN said last night that its investigation is now over.

Comment Tagged: , , , , , ,