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Whois privacy supporters to top 20,000

Kevin Murphy, July 7, 2015, 11:11:50 (UTC), Domain Registrars

Over 20,000 people have put their names to statements slamming proposals that would ban some commercial web sites from using Whois privacy on their domains.

ICANN’s public comment period on a working group’s Whois privacy reform proposals closes today after two months, with roughly 11,000 individual comments — the vast majority against changes that would weaken privacy rights — already filed.

Separately, Michele Neylon of Blacknight Solutions, which hosts SaveDomainPrivacy.org, tells DI that a petition signed by more than 9,000 people will be submitted to ICANN tonight.

If we count the signatories as commenters, that would make this the largest ICANN comment period to date, outstripping the 14,000 comments received when religious groups objected to the approval of .xxx in 2010.

SaveDomainPrivacy.org and RespectOurPrivacy.org, separate registrar-led initiatives, are responsible for the large majority of comments.

While registrars no doubt have business reasons for objecting to the muddling the Whois privacy market, their letter-writing outreach has been based on their claims that they could be forced to unmask the Whois of vulnerable home-business owners and such.

The Privacy & Proxy Services Accreditation Issues Working Group (PPSAI) report, published in May, sketches out a framework that could allow intellectual property owners to have privacy removed from domains they suspect of hosting infringing content.

A minority position appended to the report by MarkMonitor, Facebook, LegitScript and supported by members of the Intellectual Property and Business Constituencies, would put a blanket ban on using privacy on domains used to commercially transact.

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Comments (3)

  1. Kris says:

    This ICANN proposal is a dream come true for stalkers and trolls. I hope for once ICANN will have the decency to take into account the many comments and reject this proposal.

    As an adult webmaster, I also want to point out that back in 2010 it was not just the religious Right that opposed the .xxx tld. The majority of the adult industry saw the proposed tld either as unnecessary or as a threat. If you look at the comments ICANN received back then, you’ll find tons of emails from individuals and companies in the adult industry recommending that ICANN reject the .xxx tld proposal.

  2. James Gannon says:

    I guess geeks do care more about privacy than Christians care about porn after-all.

    =)

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