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The internet is still working after KSK roll

Kevin Murphy, October 16, 2018, 10:48:56 (UTC), Domain Tech

The first-ever change to the security keys at the top of the DNS tree appears to have been a non-event.

While ICANN received reports of some disruptions after last Thursday’s KSK rollover, the impact appears to have fallen short of the millions of users that had been speculated.

ICANN said yesterday:

After evaluation of the available data, there does not appear to be a significant number of Internet end-users who have been persistently and negatively impacted by the changing of the key.

The few issues that have arisen appear to have been quickly mitigated and none suggested a systemic failure that would approach the threshold (as defined by the ICANN community) to initiate a reversal of the roll. In that context, it appears the rollover to the new Key Signing Key, known as KSK 2017, has been a success.

The KSK, also sometimes called the “trust anchor”, is the ultimate cryptographic key in the chain that secures all DNSSEC queries on the internet.

October 11 was the first time it had been changed since the first version came online in 2010.

While changing the key was broadly considered sound security practice, the roll was delayed by a year after it was discovered that potentially millions of endpoints were using DNS resolvers not properly configured to use the 2017 key.

After much research, outreach and gnashing of teeth, it was decided that the risk posed by rolling the KSK now fell within acceptable parameters of collateral damage.

Experts from the likes of Google and Verisign, and one ICANN director, had urged caution and said perhaps the roll should be delayed further while more data was gathered.

But they were in the minority, ICANN went ahead anyway, and it seems their fears have not come to pass.

The KSK is now likely to be rolled regularly — it could be as little as once every five years, or more frequently.

It also gives ICANN the opportunity to eventually update the system to swap out its current RSA keys for keys based on elliptical curve cryptography, which could reduce the traffic load on the DNS as a whole.

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Comments (1)

  1. Mark Thorpe says:

    Something so serious, sounds so weird.
    The Keymaster has turned the key. We are still alive! Lol

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