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Is the new TLD program already delayed?

Kevin Murphy, November 10, 2010, 12:34:15 (UTC), Domain Registries

ICANN has missed the first target date on its recently approved new top-level domains launch timetable.

The organization was due to publish its proposed final Applicant Guidebook for public comment yesterday, but has failed to do so.

Rumor has it that it could be tomorrow or Friday before the AGB is published.

Could there be a knock-on effect? Does this mean that the process as a whole, scheduled to see the first round of new TLD applications open May 30, 2011, is already delayed?

Be warned, I’m just thinking aloud here. This is pure, idle speculation.

Two thoughts occur to me.

First, does this delay mean that ICANN will not be able to vote on the AGB at its December 10 meeting, as planned?

Second, does this delay create a scenario in which the program’s opponents will be able to lobby for further delays?

The original, quite tight timetable called for a November 9 AGB publication date and the immediate launch of a 30-day public comment period.

Doors would have closed to feedback on December 9, the day before the next ICANN board meeting.

With the AGB publication deadline now missed, and if ICANN otherwise sticks to its plan, a 30-day comment window would still be open when the board convenes in Cartagena.

Since ICANN is not in the habit of voting on issues that are still subject to open comment periods, my guess is that its best bet now will be to tighten the schedule.

While the board has seemingly okayed 30 days for community input, I’m not sure how binding that is, and my reading of ICANN’s bylaws suggests that it could be quite easily be reduced to anything as short as 21 days.

A comment period that lasted beyond December 10 would enable an organization opposed to the new TLD program to submit comments after the vote has been cast, allowing no time for the board to consider them.

This seemingly counter-intuitive move would however create grounds for a subsequent Reconsideration Request if the AGB is approved in Colombia, potentially delaying the process.

Would this be a clever strategy? I doubt it. Reconsideration Requests rarely work, and are hardly the most effective way to have your views heard within ICANN.

Still, these are strange times, and anything seems possible.

One thing is certain, given the enthusiastic reception the recent publication of the timetable received, it will be dispiriting to many today to see that ICANN has already missed its first deliverable date.

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