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Experts say piracy law will break the internet

Kevin Murphy, May 26, 2011, 15:15:31 (UTC), Domain Tech

Five of the world’s leading DNS experts have come together to draft a report slamming America’s proposed PROTECT IP Act, comparing it to the Great Firewall of China.

In a technical analysis of the bill’s provisions, the authors conclude that it threatens to weaken the security and stability of the internet, putting it at risk of fragmentation.

The bill (pdf), proposed by Senator Leahy, would force DNS server operators, such as ISPs, to intercept and redirect traffic destined for domains identified as hosting pirated content.

The new paper (pdf) says this behavior is easily circumvented, incompatible with DNS security, and would cause more problems than it solves.

The paper was written by: Steve Crocker, Shinkuro; David Dagon, Georgia Tech; Dan Kaminsky, DKH; Danny McPherson, Verisign and Paul Vixie of the Internet Systems Consortium.

These are some of the brightest guys in the DNS business. Three sit on ICANN’s Security and Stability Advisory Committee and Crocker is vice-chairman of ICANN’s board of directors.

One of their major concerns is that PROTECT IP’s filtering would be “fundamentally incompatible” with DNSSEC, the new security protocol that has been strongly embraced by the US government.

The authors note that any attempts to redirect domains at the DNS level would be interpreted as precisely the kind of man-in-the-middle attack that DNSSEC was designed to prevent.

They also point out that working around these filters would be easy – changing user DNS server settings to an overseas provider would be a trivial matter.

PROTECT IP’s DNS filtering will be evaded through trivial and often automated changes through easily accessible and installed software plugins. Given this strong potential for evasion, the long-term benefits of using mandated DNS filtering to combat infringement seem modest at best.

If bootleggers start using dodgy DNS servers in order to find file-sharing sites, they put themselves at risk of other types of criminal activity, the paper warns.

If piracy sites start running their own DNS boxes and end users start subscribing to them, what’s to stop them pharming users by capturing their bank or Paypal traffic, for example?

The paper also expresses concern that a US move to legitimize filtering could cause other nations to follow suit, fragmenting the mostly universal internet.

If the Internet moves towards a world in which every country is picking and choosing which domains to resolve and which to filter, the ability of American technology innovators to offer products and services around the world will decrease.

This, incidentally, is pretty much the same argument used to push for the rejection of the .xxx top-level domain (which Crocker voted for).

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Comments (6)

  1. John B says:

    “Will somebody just think of the children”.

    This is how it starts, a butt-ignorant legislative body uses child safety, terrorists, criminals, sex offenders or pick your cause/enemy dujour to be a dodge in a crushingly obvious power grab.

    This, like all other sweeping self-empowerments, will have little or nothing to do with being used as stated, and everything to do with invasion of privacy, tax collection, and the collection of data.

    To those that use the “if you don’t like it you have something to hide” arguement, please quickly hop up from your terminals right now and go drown yourselves in the nearest toilet and spare us your incessant waving of flags.

  2. Dylan says:

    These laws that are meant to protect end up doing more harm. Patriot Act-exposes us to body scanner radiation, loss of privacy. All while we increase the threat of terrorism by bombing poor middle eastern folks.(pissing off a new generation of them)
    Food Safety Act–Allows the FDA to attack small farmers while protecting the profits of large corporate farms.
    Now this Protect IP Act. Will only cause more damage than help. This is similar to Internet Safety Act. Will that make us safe? No just more government control.
    Fact: Gov approved cigarettes kill way more people in one year than all the illegal drugs combined. I’m just saying government really messes things up when they want to regulate.
    So if all this internet control happens we wont find all these wonderful facts that expose the ineptness of our gov.
    So Vote NO! on the PROTECT IP Act.
    🙂

  3. […] published a white paper explaining their concerns in May, which I wrote about here, and today ramped up the campaign by talking to reporters in Washington, […]

  4. […] published a white paper explaining their concerns in May, which I wrote about here, and today ramped up the campaign by talking to reporters in Washington, […]

  5. […] May, DNS experts including Paul Vixie, Dan Kaminsky and now-ICANN chair Steve Crocker said that the Protect-IP Act in the US would persuade many users to switch to offshore DNS […]

  6. […] May, DNS experts including Paul Vixie, Dan Kaminsky and now-ICANN chair Steve Crocker said that the Protect-IP Act in the US would persuade many users to switch to offshore DNS […]

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