Latest news of the domain name industry

Recent Posts

ICANN changes Panama meeting dates to avoid Muslim holiday

Kevin Murphy, May 3, 2017, Domain Policy

ICANN has changed the dates of next year’s ICANN 62 public meeting to accommodate the Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr.

Eid is the movable festival marking the end of the fasting month Ramadan, when observant Muslims are allowed to start eating during daylight hours again.

In 2018, it runs from June 14-15, which would have made things difficult for Muslims hoping to attend ICANN’s mid-year meeting, previously slated to begin June 18.

So ICANN has pushed it back a week. ICANN 62 will now begin June 25. As a mid-year Policy Forum, it is the shortest meeting of the year.

The meeting is due to be held in Panama City, Panama.

Its the second change for the Panama meeting. ICANN had originally planned to meet there for ICANN 56 in mid-2016, but relocated the event to Helsinki due to the panic about Zika virus.

Hey, you! Listen to the ICANN board webcast more private sessions

Kevin Murphy, April 26, 2017, Domain Policy

ICANN’s board of directors is to live stream two sessions during an upcoming retreat, and if you’re at all interested in ICANN you really ought to tune in.

The webcasts are part of an ongoing pilot program designed to increase transparency at the very top of ICANN’s policy-making reverse-hierarchy.

The public, listen-only sessions seem to have been cherry-picked from the broader program of a retreat in Geneva over the May 6-7 weekend, and are:

Marketplace Dynamics Session I: Registries and Registrars
Saturday, 6 May, 11:15 – 12:00 UTC

Internet Governance Engagement Strategy with a Focus on the Internet Governance Forums (IGFs): Proposal to the Board
Sunday, 7 May, 09:00 – 10:00 UTC

Neither session sounds earth-shatteringly exciting, but both will be worth a listen in my view.

If nobody listens, ICANN could fairly say that streaming board meetings is a waste of money and stop doing it rather than expanding the program in future. That reduction of transparency would be in nobody’s interests.

The most recent live sessions occurred during ICANN 58 in Copenhagen last month, but until I ranted on Twitter nobody apart from me was listening.

That’s despite the fact that increased board transparency has been something the community has been crying out for for years.

So if you agree with transparency but find the chosen topics boring, perhaps just open the Adobe Connect room, hit mute, and go for brunch or play with your kids or something.

The Adobe links can be found here.

Disclosure: now that I’ve written this post, I think it’s almost inevitable that I will accidentally miss one or both of these sessions. You’re welcome to mock me should that happen (though you’ll only know whether I was there if you tune in yourself).

ICANN attendance shrank in Denmark

Kevin Murphy, April 25, 2017, Domain Policy

Attendance at ICANN’s recent meeting in Copenhagen was down about 8% on the comparable meeting a year earlier in Marrakech, according to ICANN statistics.

There were 2,089 at the Denmark meeting, down from 2,273 reported a year ago in Morocco.

The decline appears to be largely a result of relatively lower local participation. Africa is usually under-represented at ICANN meetings, but there was a surge in Marrakech, with almost 956 attendees hailing from the continent.

About half of Copenhagen participants — 1,012 people, of which 417 were first-timers — were European.

The number of remote participation attendees was much higher in Copenhagen. ICANN counted 4,428 unique users logging into Adobe Connect meeting rooms, compared to 3,458 in Marrakech.

Both Copenhagen and Marrakech, ICANNs 55 and 58, are designated as “community forums”, meaning they follow the traditional ICANN schedule. ICANN 56 was a shorter, policy-focused meeting and ICANN 57 was a longer meeting with a focus on outreach.

The stats for Copenhagen can be downloaded here (pdf).

ICANN loosens Whois privacy rules for registrars

Kevin Murphy, April 20, 2017, Domain Policy

ICANN has made it easier for registries and registrars to opt-out of Whois-related contractual provisions when they clash with local laws.

From this week, accredited domain firms will not have to show that they are being investigated by local privacy or law enforcement authorities before they can request a waiver from ICANN.

Instead, they’ll be also be able to request a waiver preemptively with a statement from said authorities to the effect that the ICANN contracts contradict local privacy laws.

In both cases, the opt-out request will trigger a community consultation — which would include the Governmental Advisory Committee — and a review by ICANN’s general counsel, before coming into effect.

The rules are mainly designed for European companies, as the EU states generally enjoy stricter privacy legislation than their North American counterparts.

European registrars and registries have so far been held to a contract that may force them to break the law, and the only way to comply with the law would be to wait for a law enforcement proceeding.

ICANN already allows registrars to request waivers from the data retention provisions of the 2013 Registrar Accreditation Agreement — which require the registrar to hold customer data for two years after the customer is no longer a customer.

Dozens of European registrars have applied for and obtained this RAA opt-out.

IANA boss quits ICANN

Kevin Murphy, April 19, 2017, Domain Policy

The head of IANA is to leave the organization, ICANN announced this week.

Elise Gerich, currently vice president of IANA Services at ICANN and president of Public Technical Identifiers (PTI), will leave in October, according to a blog post.

She’ll stick around long enough to oversee the DNS root’s first DNSSEC Key-Signing Key rollover, which is due to go ahead October 11.

Gerich has been VP of IANA since May 2010, and took on the job of PTI president last October when the IANA function was restructured to remove the US government from the mix.

ICANN said it will start the hunt for her replacement shortly.