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ICANN pushes IANA under Conrad

Kevin Murphy, February 27, 2019, Domain Policy

ICANN chief technology officer David Conrad is now “overseeing” the IANA part of the organization, ICANN has announced.

It doesn’t appear to be a promotion or change of job titles as much as a reporting structure adjustment made in the wake of a change of management at the Global Domains Division.

Kim Davies is still vice president of IANA, and president of Public Technical Identifiers, as IANA is often referred to nowadays.

Previously, Davies reported to the president of GDD, now he’s reporting to Conrad.

After Akram Atallah left GDD to run Donuts, Conrad and Atallah’s eventual permanent replacement, Cyrus Namazi, split his duties on an interim basis.

It appears that the announcement of Conrad’s new duties merely formalizes that arrangement.

It makes a lot more sense to have the largely technical IANA functions under the jurisdiction of the CTO, rather than the gTLD-centric Global Domains Division, if you ask me.

UN ruling may put .io domains at risk

Kevin Murphy, February 25, 2019, Domain Policy

The future of .io domains may have been cast into doubt, following a ruling from the UN’s highest court.

The International Court of Justice this afternoon ruled (pdf) by a 13-1 majority that “the United Kingdom is under an obligation to bring to an end its administration of the Chagos Archipelago as rapidly as possible”.

The Chagos Archipelago is a cluster of islands that the UK calls the British Indian Ocean Territory.

It was originally part of Mauritius, but was retained by the UK shortly before Mauritius gained independence in 1968, so a strategic US military base could be built on Diego Garcia, one of the islands.

The native Chagossians were all forcibly relocated to Mauritius and the Seychelles over the next several years. Today, most everyone who lives there are British or American military.

But the ICJ ruled today, after decades of Mauritian outrage, that “the process of decolonization of Mauritius was not lawfully completed when that country acceded to independence in 1968, following the separation of the Chagos Archipelago”.

So BIOT, if the UK government follows the ruling, may cease to exist in the not-too-distant future.

BIOT’s ccTLD is .io, which has become popular with tech startups over the last few years and has over 270,000 domains.

It’s run by London-based Internet Computer Bureau Ltd, which Afilias bought for $70 million almost two years ago.

Could it soon become a ccTLD without a territory, leaving it open to retirement and removal from the DNS root?

It’s not impossible, but I’ll freely admit that I’m getting into heavy, early speculation here.

There are a lot of moving parts to consider, and at time of writing the UK government has not even stated how it will respond to the non-binding ICJ ruling.

Should the UK abide by the ruling and wind down BIOT, its IO reservation on the ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 list could then be removed by the International Standards Organisation.

That would mean .io no longer fits the ICANN criteria for being a ccTLD, leaving it subject to forced retirement.

Retired TLDs are removed from the DNS root, meaning all the second-level domains under them stop working, obviously.

It’s not entirely clear how this would happen. ICANN’s Country Code Names Supporting Organization has not finished work on its policy for the retirement of ccTLDs.

TLDs are certainly not retired overnight, without the chance of an orderly winding-down.

Judging by the current state of ccNSO discussions, it appears that ccTLDs could in future be retired with or without the consent of their registry, with a five-to-10-year clock starting from the string’s removal from the ISO 3166-1 list.

Under existing ICANN procedures, I’m aware of at least two ccTLDs that have been retired in recent years.

Timor-Leste was given .tl a few years after it rebranded from Portuguese Timor, and .tp was removed from the DNS a decade later. It took five years for .an to be retired after the Netherlands Antilles’ split into several distinct territories in 2010.

But there are also weird hangers-on, such as the Soviet Union’s .su, which has an “exceptional reservation” on the ISO list and is still active (and inexplicably popular) as a ccTLD.

As I say, I’m in heavy speculative territory when it comes to .io, but it strikes me that not many registrants will consider when buying their names that the territory their TLD represents may one day simple poof out of existence at the stroke of a pen.

Afilias declined to comment for this article.

Updated: More .amazon delay as governments cancel talks

Kevin Murphy, February 25, 2019, Domain Policy

The future of Amazon’s bid for .amazon has been cast into more doubt after South American governments cancelled talks with ICANN.

The new secretary general of the Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization, Alexandra Moreira, wrote to ICANN CEO Göran Marby February 13 to call off a meeting that had been planned to take place in Brasilia, February 19.

She blamed unspecified “unavoidable circumstances” for the cancellation, but insisted it was unrelated to the .amazon issue.

“It is necessary to clarify that the above mentioned circumstances have no connection whatsoever with neither the substance nor the agenda of the postponed meeting,” she wrote.

I believe the cancellation is related to the ongoing political instability in ACTO member Venezuela, which has recently spilled onto its borders with fellow members Brazil and Colombia.

Moreira reiterated that ACTO remains committed to talks to get the .amazon impasse resolved.

The cancellation of the February 19 meeting causes timing issues for ICANN’s board of directors, which has promised to vote on the .amazon applications at its meetings in Kobe, Japan, at ICANN 64, which kicks off in less than two weeks.

Brazilian Governmental Advisory Committee representative Achilles Zaluar has meanwhile reached out to Marby to request a delay of this decision until ICANN 65, which takes place in June.

Eight-nation ACTO is unhappy with Amazon’s encroachment onto what it sees as its geographic name rights, even though the Amazon region is typically known as Amazonia locally.

Amazon has offered to protect culturally sensitive terms at the second level and to support future efforts to secure a .amazonia TLD.

But its latest offers have still not been formally presented to and discussed with ACTO.

This post was updated an hour after publication to provide additional context to the cancellation.

Expect more Whois accuracy emails under new ICANN policy

Kevin Murphy, February 25, 2019, Domain Policy

Registrars will be obliged to send out even more Whois accuracy emails, under a set of recommendations being considered in ICANN.

Assuming recent recommendations out of the Whois policy working group are accepted, every registrant of a gTLD domain with something listed in the “Organization” field will receive a one-off mail from their registrar asking them to confirm its accuracy.

It’s Recommendation 12 of the EPDP Team Final Report, which was published last week (pdf) by ICANN’s first Expedited Policy Development Process working group.

In general, the Organization field would be redacted in the public Whois under the proposed policy, but registrants will be proactively asked if they want to opt in to having it published.

While registrars can pick their own methods to conduct this outreach, email seem like the most likely medium in the vast majority of cases.

These mails would be sent out the registrants of the over 192 million gTLD domains (if they have something in their Org field) at some point between May 2019, when ICANN is likely to formally adopt the policy, and February 29, 2020, which is EPDP group’s recommended implementation deadline.

In theory, the Org field is perhaps the main indicator of whether a domain is registered to a natural person (and therefore subject to the General Data Protection Regulation) or a legal person (and therefore not).

But it’s not uncommon for registrants or registrars to simply populate the field with the name of the natural-person registrant, even when there’s no actual organization involved.

That’s a GDPR problem, as it means personally identifiable information could leak into the public Whois.

Under the EPDP’s recommendation, registrars would be obliged to reach out to their customers to confirm whether the contents of their Org field are correct, and to ask whether they want that information to be made public.

Opting in would mean the registrar would begin to publish Org data in the public Whois. Ignoring the email or actively refusing publication would mean your registrar would redact or delete this field.

After this mass outreach has finished, registrars would stop redacting the Org field, unless the registrant has not consented to its publication.

For new registrations, registrars would have to show you a prominent warning that the Org data will be published and get your consent for it to do so.

The recommendation is among 29 that were arrived at following over six months of intensive discussions in the EPDP group.

Others we’ve previously reported on include the total elimination of the Admin Contact, making the Technical Contact both smaller and completely optional, and the mandatory introduction of an anonymous means for Whois users to contact registrants.

The recommendations have been submitted to the GNSO Council, which will vote on them March 4.

The EPDP report will then be opened for 30 days of public comment, before being sent to the ICANN board of directors for a full, final vote.

The policy will replace the current Temporary Specification governing Whois, which the board rushed through on an emergency basis last May in order to make the DNS ecosystem as GDPR-compliant as possible when the EU law came into effect.

The EPDP group is expected to shortly enter “phase two” of its work, which will look at whether there should be a unified access mechanism for security and intellectual property interests to snoop on otherwise private Whois data.

Namazi named new GDD boss

Kevin Murphy, February 22, 2019, Domain Policy

Cyrus Namazi has been appointed as the new head of ICANN’s Global Domains Division.

He’s been in the role on an interim basis since November, when former GDD president Akram Atallah left to lead Donuts.

Namazi won’t be “president” though, his new job title is senior vice president. He was previously VP of DNS industry engagement, having joined ICANN in 2013.

He’ll be on the executive team and report to CEO Göran Marby, ICANN said.

Namazi and Atallah worked together in their pre-ICANN days at technology firm Conexant Systems.

The GDD basically overseas everything related to ICANN’s gTLD contracted parties.