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MarkMonitor to change hands in $3.55 billion deal

MarkMonitor owner Thomson Reuters is to sell of its IP division, which includes the brand-protection registrar, to private equity in a $3.55 billion all-cash deal.

The company said it will sell its Intellectual Property & Science business Onex Corporation and Baring Private Equity Asia.

MarkMonitor is of course a small part of that division. It also includes its Web of Science, Thomson CompuMark, Thomson Innovation, MarkMonitor, Thomson Reuters Cortellis and Thomson IP Manager services.

The unit reportedly has 4,000 employees and $1 billion in annual revenue.

Thomson Reuters said it will use $1 billion of the sale price to buy back shares and the rest to pay off debts.

The company revealed plans to get rid of the unit last November. Analysts said it was not core to its growth strategy.

Thomson Reuters acquired then privately held MarkMonitor for an undisclosed sum in 2012.

GoDaddy gets its dot-brand

GoDaddy has become a new gTLD registry with the delegation yesterday of .godaddy.

It’s a dot-brand, so domain name registrations will not be made available to the general public.

In one of the shortest mission statements found in new gTLD applications, the company describes .godaddy like this:

The mission or purpose of the .GODADDY gTLD is strictly for branding protection and internal use. The gTLD .GODADDY will give visitors to any .GODADDY site the assurance that they are truly dealing with Go Daddy and not an imposter or cybersquatter.

GoDaddy has not yet gone live with its nic.godaddy site.

It’s not the first domain name firm to get its own dot-brand. Notably, Neustar and Verisign own .neustar and .verisign.

It’s not the only registrar with a dot-brand, either. France’s OVH got there first with .ovh.

GoDaddy originally applied for two other gTLDs — .home and .casa — but withdrew their applications almost immediately after a shift of company strategy.

Google offers reseller widget, signs first partners

Google’s registrar, Google Domains, has started offering a widget to make it easier to become a reseller.

The Google Domains widget has already been deployed by five web site builders — Big Cartel, Duda, Selz, Square and Webflow — the company said.

These companies have evidently embedded the software — a chunk of Javascript — into their web sites.

Google said it handles payment and DNS configuration — pointing the newly registered domains to the appropriate service — on behalf of its partners.

More details are here and here. For some reason Google is using domains.withgoogle.com for this program, even though it has a perfectly serviceable dot-brand in the root.

Facebook, under Chinese court threat, transfers Instagram.com to its new registrar

Kevin Murphy, April 19, 2016, Domain Registrars

It’s not quite cyberflight, but Facebook has transferred threatened domain name instagram.com to its newly acquired in-house registrar.

Whois records show that the domain, used for the popular photo-sharing social network, was moved from MarkMonitor to RegistrarSEC yesterday.

It emerged on Friday that Facebook had recently acquired RegistrarSEC.

So why the transfer?

It does not appear that the move is part of a wholesale transfer of domains — facebook.com, whatsapp.com, fb.com and all the other Facebook domains I checked are still with MarkMonitor.

Instead, I would speculate that it’s related to the lawsuit in China in which the family of a deceased cybersquatter are fighting for the return of the domain to their ownership.

Instagram acquired the name for $100,000 from the Guangdong-based Zhou family in January 2011, just a couple of months after Zhou Weiming, the now deceased patriarch, bought it from an American domainer.

According to a lawsuit (pdf) filed against the family in California by Instagram this January, Zhou’s widow and two daughters are suing the third daughter in a Chinese court for selling the domain without the proper authority.

They want the domain returned to them.

By transferring instagram.com to a registrar completely controlled by Facebook, the company has removed one huge risk factor from the Chinese lawsuit.

If MarkMonitor were to be served with a Chinese court order ordering the transfer of the domain to the Zhous, and it were to comply, the Instagram service used by millions could be held hostage by a group of known cybersquatters.

Now that the domain is at RegistrarSEC, Facebook gets the ability to refuse to comply with any such order.

This all begs the question of whether the deep-pocketed social network would go to the trouble of acquiring a registrar (with only 11 names to its accreditation) purely to provide a layer of insurance.

A fresh ICANN accreditation would be cheaper, but would take longer, and transferring to a different third-party registrar wouldn’t really solve the problem.

Instagram is predicted by one analyst to provide Facebook with $5.8 billion in annual revenue by the end of the decade.

Google registrar dumps .com for dot-brand

Kevin Murphy, March 30, 2016, Domain Registrars

Google has started using its primary dot-brand gTLD for its registrar business.

The URL domains.google.com now bounces users to domains.google. The site sells domains from $12 a year with free Whois privacy.

Is this move a big deal for improving new gTLD awareness? I don’t think so.

Anyone visiting any major registrar’s storefront is likely to become aware that new gTLDs exist really rather quickly, regardless of the registrar’s own choice of domain.

A registrar using its dot-brand is not going to work wonders for new gTLD awareness in the general populace.

If Google were to start using .google for any of its non-domain projects, such as search.google, that would be different.

The company was already using registry.google for its registry business’s web site.