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ICANN closes GoDaddy Whois probe

Kevin Murphy, August 9, 2018, Domain Registrars

ICANN has closed its investigation into GoDaddy’s Whois practices with no action taken.

Senior VP of compliance Jamie Hedlund yesterday wrote to David Redl, head of the US National Telecommunications and Information Administration, to provide an update on the probe, news of which first emerged in April.

The NTIA and members of the intellectual property community had complained that GoDaddy was throttling Whois access over port 43 and that it was masking certain fields in the output.

That was when GoDaddy and the rest of the ICANN-regulated industry was working under the old rules, before the new temporary Whois policy had been introduced to comply with the EU General Data Protection Regulation.

Hedlund told Redl in a letter (pdf):

Based on our review and testing (including outside of ICANN’s network), GoDaddy is not currently masking WHOIS data or otherwise limiting access to its WHOIS services. Consequently, the complaints related to GoDaddy’s masking of certain WHOIS fields, rate limiting, and whitelisting of IP addresses have been addressed and closed.

GoDaddy had said earlier this year that it was throttling access over port 43 in an attempt to reduce the availability of Whois data to the spammers that have been increasingly plaguing its customers with offers of web site development and search engine optimization services.

Blacknight calls for Ireland to slash domain prices

Kevin Murphy, August 3, 2018, Domain Registrars

Irish registrar Blacknight Solutions has called for its local ccTLD registry to cut the price of .ie domains in order to drive growth.

In a press release, CEO Michele Neylon said that .ie names — typically renewing at over €20 — can cost twice as much as other European ccTLDs.

He said that a recently liberalization of registration rules set out by registry IEDR led to a burst of 29,000 new registrations in the first half of the year.

This relaxation has presumably led to cost savings that could be passed on to consumers, he said.

According to Blacknight, there are 46 .ie domains registered per 1,000 head of population, which ranks Ireland 16th out of 22 European countries.

Wix.com obtains ICANN accreditation — bad news for Web.com?

Web site building tools provider Wix.com has got itself an ICANN accreditation, potentially bad news for current partner Web.com.

The Nasdaq-listed, Israel-based company popped up on the official registrar list in the last day or so with the IANA ID 3817.

That means it could before long start selling gTLD domains directly from the registries rather than going through its current business partner.

According to its domain services agreement and other online sources, Wix currently acts as a reseller for Network Solutions, a Web.com company.

Its retail prices are therefore, as you might expect, rather above the market average, pretty much in line with NetSol’s.

If it does choose to go solo, it could potentially pass on savings to its customers, or just pocket higher margins on domain sales.

While Wix says it has 110 million users, obviously it has sold nowhere near that number of domains.

Its relationship with NetSol is not lucrative enough for Web.com to count the relationship as a risk factor in its Securities and Exchange Commission filings, though Wix is listed as one of just a small handful of competitors.

If Web.com should lose Wix as a reseller, we won’t get to find out what impact that had on revenue; Web.com’s going private in a $2 billion deal.

Disclosure: I’ve had to listen to or skip through repetitive Wix ads on YouTube a dozen times a day for what seems like years, so I’m not naturally predisposed to like this company. Same goes for Grammarly. Grrrr!

KeyDrive reverses into CentralNic in $55 million deal

CentralNic this morning confirmed that it has signed a deal to merge with KeyDrive to dramatically grow its market share in the registrar and registry markets.

The deal, technically a reverse takeover, is worth up to $55 million, $10.5 million of which is performance-related.

KeyDrive is the holding company for brands including the registrars Key-Systems, Moniker and BrandShelter and the registries OpenRegistry and KSRegistry.

It is by far the bigger player in the registrar space. The combined company will have 7.1 million domains under management, 5.8 million of which will come from the Luxembourg-based firm.

“The acquisition of KeyDrive is transformative for CentralNic, significantly increasing the Company’s scale and giving it significant extra firepower in the domain name industry to rival the traditional major players,” CentralNic CEO Ben Crawford said in a statement.

CentralNic says the deal will make it the 11th-largest registrar in terms of gTLD domains under management and the fifth-largest registry back-end in terms of TLDs managed (which will hit 118).

KeyDrive had 2017 revenue of $58.26 million and adjusted EBITDA of $5.87 million. Operating profit was $4.3 million.

CentralNic had 2017 revenue of £24.3 million ($32.2 million), adjusted EBITDA of £6.6 million ($8.7 million) and operating profit of £1.8 million ($2.4 million). These numbers do not include the £3.2 million-a-year SKNIC business, which CentralNic acquired right at the end of last year.

KeyDrive CEO Alexander Siffrin will become COO of CentralNic and one of its largest shareholders, owning 16.4% of the combined company’s shares.

The acquisition itself is fairly complex.

CentralNic will raise $16.5 million cash in a share placement and it will issue $19.3 million of shares to a holding company majority-owned by Siffrin. The remaining $10.5 million is performance related and may be paid in a combination of cash and shares, mostly shares.

It’s all subject to shareholder approval at an August 1 general meeting.

Assuming the deal closes, CentralNic says its plan is to become the “GoDaddy of Emerging Markets”, though what this means in practice is not immediately clear.

It does seem that there will be some job losses as the company rationalizes staffing across its various locations.

As far as technical integration goes, CentralNic’s registrars will migrate to KeyDrive’s platform and KeyDrive’s registries will migrate to CentralNic’s registry platform.

The potential for a deal was first revealed in March, after a leak. Trading in its shares was halted as a result, but resumed this morning.

GoDaddy signs up for basically unrestricted .travel gTLD

Donuts has started to market the now practically prehistoric and newly liberalized gTLD .travel, and it’s signed up GoDaddy to offer domains there.

The registry, which acquired .travel from former owner Tralliance in February, announced a soft relaunch on its blog last week, highlighting that GoDaddy, Name.com and Encirca are now among its registrars.

GoDaddy appears to be only new signing there — Encirca and Name.com have been carrying .travel from long before Donuts got involved and are in fact its two largest registrars.

The big daddy of the registrar space appears to have become interested after Donuts “simplified” the process of registering .travel domains. Donuts said:

Since the acquisition, Donuts has simplified the registration process, enabling registrants to stay on the registrar’s website for the entirety of the registration/checkout process. Donuts believes that this streamlined registration process will increase registrations, as compared to the previous process, which was disjointed and complex for registrants.

What this seems to translate to is: .travel is essentially an unrestricted TLD, despite being applied for in 2003’s round of “sponsored” gTLDs.

If you attempt to register a .travel domain at GoDaddy today, the only additional friction en route to the purchase button is a simple, prominent check-box asking you to confirm you are a member of the travel community.

That’s apparently enough for Donuts to say it has fulfilled the part of its ICANN contract that says it has to carry out a “review of Eligibility prior to completion of all registrations.”

Under its previous ownership, .travel required registrars to bounce their customers to the registry web site to obtain an authentication code during the registration process.

.travel names are still pretty pricey — GoDaddy was going to hit me with a bill of over $110 before I abandoned my cart, and that was just a year-one promotional price.

The gTLD peaked at 215,000 domains 10 years ago but now sits at under 18,000, having seen slight declines every month for the past five years.