Latest news of the domain name industry

Recent Posts

Is Go Daddy’s size a competition concern?

Kevin Murphy, March 17, 2010, Domain Registrars

Go Daddy is undoubtedly the runaway success story of the domain name industry.

It may not be as big as VeriSign, but unlike VeriSign it was not simply handed a multi-billion dollar resource to manage. It was essentially scratch-built. It didn’t even have first-mover advantage – Register.com and Network Solutions had that, and Go Daddy’s been eating their lunches for years.

The company has got where it is today through, in my opinion, a combination of cheap prices, decent customer service and populist marketing. Mainly the cheap prices, but I doubt that putting a great big pair of boobs on TV during the Super Bowl can have hurt sales.

But how big is the company? And with the introduction of new gTLDs, is its size now a cause for concern? (continue reading)

Big claims from small registrar

Kevin Murphy, March 16, 2010, Domain Registrars

You’ve got to admire the cojones on Domainmonster, an upstart registrar from the UK.

In a delightfully hyperbolic press release out today, the company reveals it is “the world’s largest new domain name supplier” and compares itself to Go Daddy.

Because I think it’s funny, I’ll post the meat of the press release before de-constructing it. (continue reading)

Go Daddy busts through 40 million mark

Kevin Murphy, March 10, 2010, Domain Registrars

Go Daddy has registered its 40 millionth domain, and it’s closing in on a 50% market share.

The company said that it is now three times the size of its nearest competitor, eNom, and is registering, renewing or transferring one domain per second on average.

Adding domains at a rate of one million per month, Go Daddy could feasibly break through 50 million by the end of the year, but seasonal ups and downs may make early 2011 a more likely timeframe. Go Daddy tends to see a spike in sales after its notorious Super Bowl commercials.

The registrant of the company’s 40 millionth domain does not want his or her identity revealed.