Latest news of the domain name industry

Recent Posts

A new gTLD kills itself off for the second time

Kevin Murphy, January 18, 2018, Domain Registries

British pharmacy chain Boots has applied to ICANN to terminate its dot-brand contract for the second time.

The company asked for its .boots Registry Agreement, signed in 2015, to be ended in December and ICANN opened the request for public comment this week.

What’s weird about the request is that Boots had already asked for self-termination last April, but that request was subsequently withdrawn by the company.

Boots seems to have changed its mind, twice, in a year.

As I noted first time around, .boots was the first example of a dot-brand that also matches a generic class of goods to chose the easy way out.

It’s quite likely the two-year freeze on re-applying for the string, should anyone want to, will be over by the time the next new gTLD application window opens.

.boots only had the contractually mandated placeholder domain nic.boots live.

Ramchandani promoted to Radix CEO

Kevin Murphy, January 15, 2018, Domain Registries

New gTLD registry Radix has appointed long-time business head Sandeep Ramchandani as CEO.

He’s replacing Bhavin Turakhia, who is CEO of parent company Directi and executive chairman of Radix.

Ramchandani had a lot of autonomy as business head and VP of the company and, in my view, has been basically CEO in all but name for years. I’ve accidentally called him CEO in the pages of DI more than once.

In a press release, he said: “Just as the first few years of Radix were about demonstrating proof of concept, the next few will be about growing awareness and delivering accelerated growth. We are also actively looking to acquire more TLD assets to reach newer segments of the market while leveraging economies of scale.”

The company has a portfolio of nine gTLDs, including .website, .store and .online, and recently announced that its 2017 revenue topped $12 million.

Bezsonoff replaces Kaine at Neustar

Kevin Murphy, January 10, 2018, Domain Registries

.CO Internet alum Nicolai Bezsonoff has replaced Sean Kaine as head of Neustar’s domain name business.

Neustar today announced that Bezsonoff has been appointed VP and general manager of the Registry Solutions business.

That’s Kaine’s old job. I hear he’s leaving the company of his own volition, but I don’t know where he’s going.

Bezsonoff was in a similar role in the Security Solutions division.

He joined Neustar when it acquired Colombian ccTLD registry .CO, where he was COO and co-founder, for $109 million almost four years ago.

The announcement comes just a few weeks after it was announced that Afilias is to take over the running of Australia’s 3.1 million-name ccTLD .au, one of Neustar’s marquee tenants.

Active new gTLD domains drop below 20 million

Kevin Murphy, January 10, 2018, Domain Registries

The number of domain names recorded in new gTLD zone files has dipped below 20 million for the first time in 18 months.

The total crossed the milestone in the wrong direction January 1, according to DI’s records.

As of today, there are 19.8 million domains in zone files, down from a peak of 26 million in March 2017.

The count has gone down by about half a million names in the last 90 days, largely as a result of declines in .top, .xyz and .kiwi, which have each recorded six-figure losses.

It’s the first time that the zone files have showed the number of domains going below 20 million since the beginning of June 2016, when XYZ.com sold millions of .xyz domains for a penny each. Most of those names did not renew a year later.

Zone files do not record every domain that has been registered, just those with active name servers. Others may be registered but unused or on hold for various reasons.

.web closer to reality as antitrust probe ends

Kevin Murphy, January 10, 2018, Domain Registries

Verisign has been given the all-clear by the US government to go ahead and run the new gTLD .web, despite competition concerns.

The Department of Justice told the company yesterday that the antitrust investigation it launched almost exactly a year ago is now “closed”.

Verisign’s secret proxy in the 2016 auction, the original .web applicant Nu Dot Co, now plans to try to execute its Registry Agreement with ICANN.

That contract would then be assigned to Verisign through the normal ICANN process.

The .com registry operator today filed this statement with the US Securities and Exchange Commission:

As the Company previously disclosed, on January 18, 2017, the Company received a Civil Investigative Demand from the Antitrust Division of the United States Department of Justice (“DOJ”) requesting certain material related to the Company becoming the registry operator for the .web gTLD. On January 9, 2018, the DOJ notified the Company that this investigation was closed. Verisign previously announced on August 1, 2016, that it had provided funds for Nu Dot Co’s successful bid for the .web gTLD and the Company anticipates that Nu Dot Co will now seek to execute the .web Registry Agreement with ICANN and thereafter assign it to Verisign upon consent from ICANN.

This basically means that Justice disagrees with anyone who thinks Verisign plans to operate .web in a way that just props up its .com market dominance, such as by burying it without a trace.

People clamoring to register .web domains may still have some time to wait, however.

Rival applicant Donuts, via subsidiary Ruby Glen, still has a pending lawsuit against ICANN in California.

Donuts had originally sued to prevent the .web auction going ahead in mid-2016, trying to force Nu Dot Co to reveal who was really pulling its strings.

After the auction, in which Verisign committed to pay ICANN a record-setting $125 million, Donuts sued to have the result overturned.

But in November 2016, a judge ruled that the no-suing covenant that all new gTLD applicants had to sign was valid, throwing out Donuts’ case.

Donuts is now appealing that ruling, however, filing its most-recent brief just a few weeks ago.

Whether that will stop ICANN from signing the .web contract and delegating it to Verisign is an open question. It managed to delegate .africa to ZA Central Registry despite the existence of an ongoing lawsuit by a competing applicant.

If history is any guide, we may see a rival applicant apply for a temporary restraining order against .web’s delegation before long.