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Now Latvia guts Whois to comply with GDPR

Kevin Murphy, March 19, 2018, Domain Registries

Latvia has become the latest country to announce plans to cut back on Whois provision to comply with incoming European Union privacy law.

Its .lv ccTLD is the first I’m aware of to announce that it plans to cut back on the amount of data it actually collects in addition to how much it publishes.

NIC.lv said it will not longer require registrants to submit one postal address, instead of two. It will not longer require a something called a “fax” number, whatever that is, either.

The registry currently does not publish the names or physical addresses of its natural person registrants, but following the introduction of the General Data Protection Regulation in May it will stop publishing telephone numbers and email addresses too.

It will instead present a form that can be used to contact the registrant, a little like ICANN is proposing for gTLDs.

The company also plans to rate-limit Whois queries to mitigate harvesting.

The proposed changes are open for comments until April 12.

.lv has about 120,000 domains under management, according to its web site.

Portugal joins the million-domain club

Kevin Murphy, March 15, 2018, Domain Registries

Portuguese ccTLD .pt passed one million registrations for the first time earlier this month, DNS.pt said this week.

The millionth name was meckos.pt, registered by a local textile machinery company of that name, the registry said.

The ccTLD ended 2017 with 976,370 names under management and as of today stands at 1,001,552 names, according to statistics published on the DNS.pt web site.

The company says it is currently growing fast, taking 10,693 new registrations in January, up 30% compared to the same month last year.

Austria to stop publishing most Whois data

Kevin Murphy, March 15, 2018, Domain Registries

Austrian ccTLD operator nic.at will no longer publish any Whois information for individual registrants, in order to comply with incoming EU privacy law.

“Natural persons’ data will no longer be published from mid-May 2018,” the company said today.

Data concerning legal entities such as companies will continue to be published, it added.

The move is of course an effort to become compliant with the General Data Protection Regulation, which currently has the industry scrambling around in the dark looking for ways avoid avoid millions of euros of potential fines.

nic.at will continue to collect the private data of individual registrants, but it will only publish technical information such as the name of the registrar and name servers in response to public Whois queries.

Companies will have their names and addresses published, but will have the option to have their email address and phone number hidden.

nic.at said it will disclose records to “law enforcement agencies, lawyers or people who contact nic.at following domain disputes and can prove that their rights have been infringed”.

People will be able to opt-in to having their information published

It’s arguably a more Draconian implementation of GDPR than the one proposed by ICANN for gTLDs, but it appears to be in line with plans already announced by Nominet for .uk and DENIC for .de.

CentralNic and KeyDrive in merger talks

Kevin Murphy, March 14, 2018, Domain Registries

CentralNic and KeyDrive, two major European domain firms, are in merger talks, CentralNic confirmed this morning.

CentralNic said that the transaction, should it close, would be a “reverse takeover” of itself by KeyDrive.

That’s where a private company, in this case KeyDrive, reverses into a public one, in this case AIM-listed CentralNic.

Luxembourg-based KeyDrive is the holding company for brands including the registrars Key-Systems, Moniker and BrandShelter and the registries OpenRegistry and KSRegistry.

London-based CentralNic is a registry provider for the likes of .xyz, recent acquirer of Slovakian TLD .sk, and owner of registrars Internet.bs and Instra.

CentralNic said: “CentralNic and KeyDrive Group believe that the combination of the two businesses would have strong strategic logic and economies of scale, and would represent an opportunity to create a group with advanced technology platforms delivering significant recurring revenues for every major customer type within the industry.”

If a deal should be struck, it would happen in the second quarter, the company said.

The announcement was made today after news of the talks leaked.

Trading in CentralNic shares has been temporarily suspended.

After long fight, Donuts adds .charity to its gTLD stable

Kevin Murphy, March 13, 2018, Domain Registries

Snatching victory from the jaws of defeat, Donuts has prevailed in the two-horse race for the .charity gTLD.

The company appears to have privately resolved its contention set, paying off rival bidder Famous Four Media, judging by updates to ICANN’s web site today.

The gTLD had been scheduled for an ICANN “last resort” auction in April, but that’s now off.

Famous Four has also withdrawn its application, leaving Donuts the only remaining applicant.

I believe it will be Donuts’ 239th 240th gTLD.

But for a while it looked like Famous Four had a slam-dunk on its hands.

Back in 2014, the Independent Objector of the new gTLD program had filed an Community Objection against Donuts’ application, saying it was too risky to unleash a .charity domain onto the world without registration eligibility restrictions.

The fear was (and probably still is) that fraudsters could use the domains to lend an air of credibility to their online scams.

The IO prevailed, pretty much gifting Famous Four — which had proposed restrictions — the TLD.

But Donuts embarked upon an arduous set of appeals, including an Independent Review Process case, that culminated, last December, in a ruling (pdf) that reversed the original Community Objection decision.

That cleared the way for Donuts back into the application process and, now, the private auction it seems to have won.

Due to ICANN’s adoption of Governmental Advisory Committee advice on sensitive strings, Donuts will be obliged to put some Public Interest Commitments into its .charity contract, with the aim of reducing abuse.