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Richemont kills off two more dot-brands

Luxury goods maker Richemont has decided to ditch two more of its dot-brand gTLDs.

The company has asked ICANN to terminate its registry contracts for .chloe and .montblanc, according to documents published by ICANN late last week.

Chloe is a fashion brand; Mont Blanc sells pens, jewelery and such.

No reason was given for either termination. Registries are allowed to self-terminate their Registry Agreements for any reason, given 180 days notice.

In both cases, ICANN has already agreed not to transfer the gTLD to a new operator. That’s a special privilege dot-brands get in their RAs.

Neither gTLD ever progressed beyond a single nic.brand placeholder page

Four additional Richemont dot-brands — .piaget, .iwc, .cartier, .panerai — have also been live for two years or more but are in identical states of disuse.

Richemont also runs .watches, .手表 and .珠宝 (Chinese for “watches” and “jewelry” respectively) which have been in the DNS for over 18 months but do not yet have any published launch plans.

The company was a somewhat enthusiastic early adopter of the new gTLD concept, providing speakers to industry events well before the application window opened back in 2012.

It applied for 14 strings in total, 10 of which eventually went live. It dumped two of its dot-brands before contract-signing and lost two auctions for generic strings.

Both .chloe and .montblanc are expected to be removed from the DNS in October.

There are now 22 new gTLDs that have voluntarily terminated their RAs.

Key-Systems buys reseller EDC

Key-Systems has acquired one of its resellers, European Domain Centre.

The acquiring registrar did not disclose the terms of the deal, but said EDC will help boost its own BrandShelter corporate registrar business.

EDC says it has clients including AirBnB, Campari, Lycamobile, iStockPhoto and BusinessWire.

The company was founded in 2003 by Nikolaj Borge and Christopher Hofman Laursen and is based in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Its selling point has been its willingness to offer offer its customers the broadest range of gTLD and ccTLD options.

It’s been a customer of RRPproxy, Key-Systems’ reseller network, since 2008.

As it’s been using the Key-Systems IANA number all this time, it’s not possible to get an accurate figure for its domains under management from ICANN reports.

Neustar’s .au deal in peril as Aussies look in-house

Australian ccTLD registry auDA is looking at bringing its back-end infrastructure in house, to the possible detriment of Neustar.

In a surprise move, auDA said late last month that several months of talks with AusRegistry, aimed at possibly extending its current back-end contract beyond 2018, had failed.

AusRegistry has operated .au for auDA since 2002, during which time the ccTLD has grown to 3.1 million domains.

The company was acquired by Neustar in 2015 as part of its $87 million acquisition of Bombora Technologies, parent to AusRegistry and ARI.

auDA said it has now launched an invitation-only “restricted tender exercise” to find advisers to help it build its own registry back-end.

AusRegistry will be among those invited to participate, auDA confirmed.

This week, the registry also announced that it has hired Bruce Tonkin, formerly of Melbourne IT and the ICANN board of directors, to be its “Registry Transformation Project Lead”.

It will also form an “Industry-led Advisory Panel” to give .au registrars a say in how the new registry is designed and built.

XYZ acquires .storage, its 10th gTLD

XYZ.com said today that it has acquired the half-launched new gTLD .storage from its original owner.

The terms of the deal were not disclosed, but CEO Daniel Negari said in a blog post that it has been funded using some of the “excess of cash flow” from sales of .xyz domains.

The original .storage registry was Extra Space Storage, which rents out physical storage units in the US.

It started its protracted launch period a little over a year ago but had not planned to go to general availability until July this year.

Having apparently passed through its sunrise period and a special landrush for the storage industry, which ended in January, it has fewer than 800 domains in its zone file.

It looks like XYZ will be essentially relaunching the gTLD from scratch, with a new sunrise period penciled in for November and an early access period and GA slated for December.

Pre-launch pricing is around the $80 mark at the few registrars I checked today, and it looks like that will remain under the new management.

That’s despite XYZ talking today about .storage as a “premium” vertically-focused TLD along the lines of its $3,000 .cars or $750 .theatre.

The company said that it will not hold back reserved names at higher, premium pricing. Even nice-looking domains such as cloud.storage will be available at the base fee, it said.

The new acquisition becomes the 10th that XYZ has a hand in running, if you count the three car-related gTLDs it manages in a joint venture with Uniregistry. The others are .security, .rent, .protection, .theatre, and .college.

More change at the top at Donuts as Tindal steps down

Donuts has lost co-founder and COO Richard Tindal, who has announced his retirement.

Tindal was one of the four domain industry executives who founded Donuts in order to take advantage of ICANN’s new gTLD program about seven years ago.

No reason was given for his departure, which was announced in a blog post, beyond “retirement”.

Co-founders Paul Stahura, Jon Nevett and Dan Schindler are all still with the company, but founding CEO Stahura recently stepped into the chairman’s role to give venture capitalist Bruce Jaffe the corner office.

Tindal had previously worked in senior roles for Verisign, Neustar and Demand Media (now Rightside).