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China and cheapo TLDs drag down industry growth — CENTR

Kevin Murphy, November 27, 2017, Domain Registries

The growth of the worldwide domain industry continued to slow in the third quarter, according to data out today from CENTR.

There were 311.1 million registered domains across over 1,500 TLDs at the end of September, according to the report, 0.7% year-over-year growth.

CENTRThe new gTLD segment, which experienced a 7.2% decline to 20.6 million names, was the biggest drag.

But that decline is largely due to just two high-volume, low-price gTLDs — .xyz and .top — which lost millions of names that had been registered for pennies apiece.

Excluding these TLDs, year-over-year growth for the whole industry would have been 2.5%, CENTR said. The report states:

Over the past 2 years, quarterly growth rates have been decreasing since peaks in early 2016. The slowdown is the result of deletes after a period of increased investment from Chinese registrants. Other explanations to the slowdown are specific TLDs, such as .xyz and .top, which have contracted significantly.

The legacy gTLDs inched up by 0.2%, largely driven by almost two million net new names in .com. In fact, only five of the 17 legacy gTLDs experienced any growth at all, CENTR said.

In the world of European ccTLDs, the average (median) growth rate has been flat, but CENTR says it sees signs of a turnaround.

CENTR is the Council of European National Top-Level Domain Registries. Its Q3 report can be downloaded here (pdf).

Domain blogger O’Meara elected to auDA board

Kevin Murphy, November 27, 2017, Domain Registries

Domainer-blogger Ned O’Meara, one of the fiercest critics of auDA, has been elected to the organization’s board of directors.

He was one of four directors elected at the Australian ccTLD registry’s Annual General Meeting today.

auDA splits its board into “demand” and “supply” classes. The former are registrants, the latter registrars and resellers.

O’Meara, a domain investor who blogs at Domainer.com.au, was elected as a demand class director, along with Nicole Murdoch, a trademark lawyer who O’Meara backed when he was prevaricating about his own run.

On the supply side, members elected Canadian-born chair of the Australian Web Industry Association and founder of 1300 Web Pro, James Deck, and Grant Wiltshire.

Wiltshire, who works for the government of the Australian state of Victoria, has been a demand-class director for the last two years. There’s no indication in his candidate statement where in the domain industry he has worked.

The election came a week after auDA named its new chair and a new independent director.

Chris Leptos is the new chair. He replaces Stuart Benjamin, who was forced out earlier this year after a “Grumpy” campaign led by O’Meara.

Leptos is deputy chair of financial advisory firm Flagstaff Partners and sits on the board of PPB Advisory. That’s the company that conducted an audit of auDA following the departure of its former CEO last year.

O’Meara landing on the board means he will of course become privy to all the information he’e been campaigning for auDA to be more transparent about recently. How this will affect his blogging remains to be seen, he has yet to write a post about his election.

New gTLDs blamed as .pl starts to shrink

Kevin Murphy, November 27, 2017, Domain Registries

Polish ccTLD .pl has lost over 125,000 domains in the last year, a change of growth trajectory blamed partly on new gTLDs.

NASK, the registry, released its third-quarter report in English today. It’s overflowing with more statistics than you could possibly need about the TLD’s performance.

The headline is that .pl is on the decline. On NASK’s web site, it reports registrations as of today are down 128,671 on the last 12 months.

PLIt has 2,577,566 active domains in total today, 2,592,014 at the end of September, about three quarters of which are direct second-level registrations.

It’s one of many ccTLDs to have started to feel the pinch over the last few years. Increased competition, spurred by the expansion of the gTLD space, has been fingered as a likely culprit.

In the report’s introduction, NASK director Wojciech Kamieniecki wrote:

Temporary slowdown of the dynamics of the .pl domain market, observed from the beginning of the year — decrease in the number of new registrations — should be perceived in the light of extending the selection of attractive names as well as a growing number of new generic domains and increase in competition in the global domain market.

The renewal rate overall was 62.22%, a slight increase on 2016 but still on the low side for an established TLD. However, if you exclude third-level registrations (under .com.pl and .net.pl for example) the rate was a much more respectable 76.37%.

There were 203,898 new domains registered in the third quarter.

The vast majority — 93.96% — of current .pl domains are registered to Polish registrants, with registrants from Germany, the UK and the US also contributing to the total.

The full Q3 report can be downloaded here (pdf).

Verisign launches name-spinner tool for if you really, really need a .com

Kevin Murphy, November 20, 2017, Domain Registries

Verisign has launched a new name-spinning tool, designed to help new businesses find relevant domain names in Verisign-managed TLDs.

It’s called NameStudio. Verisign said:

NameStudio can deliver relevant .com and .net domain name suggestions based on popular keywords, trending news topics and semantic relevance. Pulling from multiple and diverse data sources, the service can identify the context of a word, break search terms apart into logical combinations and quickly return results. It can also distinguish personal names from other keywords and use machine-learning algorithms that get smarter over time.

The machine-learning component may come in handy, based on my non-scientific, purely subjective messing around at the weekend.

I searched for “london pubs”, a subject close to my heart. Naturally enough, londonpubs.com is not available, but the suggestions were not what you’d call helpful.

NameStudio

As you can see, the closest match to London it could find was “Falkirk”, a town 400 miles away in Scotland. The column is filled with the names of British towns and cities, so the tool clearly knows what London is, even if its suggestions are not particularly useful for a London-oriented web site.

The closest match to “pubs” was “cichlids”, which Google reliably informs me is a type of fish. “ComicCon” (a famous trademark), “barbarians” and a bunch of sports, dog breeds and so on feature highly on its list of suggestions.

NameStudio obviously does not know what a “pub” is, but it’s not a particularly common word in most of Verisign’s native USA, so I tried “london bars” instead. The results there were a little more encouraging.

Again, Falkirk topped the list of London alternatives, a list that this time also prominently included the names of Australian cities.

On the “bars” column, suggestions such as “parties”, “stags” and “nights” suggests that NameStudio has a notion what I’m looking for, but the top suggestion is still “birthdays”.

I should note that the service also suggests prefixes such as “my” and “free” and suffixes such as “online” or “inc”, so if you have your heart set on a .com domain you’ll probably be able to find something containing your chosen keywords.

The domains alllondonpubs.com and alllondonbars.com were probably the best available alternatives I could find. For my hypothetical London-based pub directory/blog web site, they’re not terrible choices.

I also searched NameStudio for “domain blog”, another subject close to my heart.

The top three suggestions in the “domain” column were “pagerank”, “websites” and “query”. Potentially relevant. Certainly some are in the right ball-park. Let’s ignore that “pagerank” is a Google trademark that nobody really talks about much any more.

The top suggestions to replace “blog” were “infographic”, “snippets” and “rumor”. Again, right ball-park, but my best bet still appears to be adding a prefix or suffix to my original keywords.

I tried a few more super-premium one-word keywords too.

The best suggestion for “vodka” was “dogvodka.com”. For “attorney”, it was “funattorney.com”. For “insurance”, there were literally no available suggestions.

Currently — and to be fair the tool just launched last week — you’re probably better off looking at other name suggestion tools.

NameStudio does not appear to currently suggest domains that are listed for sale on the aftermarket. I expect that’s a feature addition that could come in future.

But possibly the main problem with the tool appears to be that it currently only looks for available names in .com, .net, .tv or .cc.

Repeating my “london pubs” search with GoDaddy and DomainsBot, which each support hundreds more TLDs, produced arguably superior results.

NameStudio

They’re only superior, of course, if you consider your chosen keywords, and the brevity of your domain, more important than your choice of TLD. For some people, a .com at the end of the domain will always be the primary consideration, and perhaps those people are Verisign’s target market.

Cops tell Nominet to yank 16,000 domains, Nominet complies

Kevin Murphy, November 15, 2017, Domain Registries

Nominet suspended over 16,000 .uk domain names at the request of law enforcement agencies in the last year.

The registry yanked 16,632 domains in the 12 months to October 31, more than double the 8,049 it suspended in the year-earlier period.

The 2016 number was in turn more than double the 2015 number. The 2017 total is more than 16 times the number of suspended domains in 2014, the first year in which Nominet established this cozy relationship with the police.

The large majority of names — 13,616 — were suspended at the request of the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit. Another 2,781 were taken down on the instruction of National Fraud Intelligence Bureau.

Nominet has over 12 million .uk domains under management, so 16,000 names is barely a blip on the radar overall.

But the fact that police can have domains taken down in .uk with barely any friction does not appear to be acting as a deterrent to bad actors when they choose their TLD.

The registry said that just 15 suspensions were reversed — which requires the consent of the reporting law enforcement agency — during the period. That’s basically flat on 2016.

“A suspension is reversed if the offending behavior has stopped and the enforcing agency has since confirmed that the suspension can be lifted,” the company said.

The company does not publish data on how many registrants requested a reversal and didn’t get one, nor does it publish any of the affected domains, so we have no way of knowing whether there’s any ambiguity or overreach in the types of domains the police more or less unilaterally have taken down.

It seems that the only reasons suspension requests do not result in suspensions are when domains have already been suspended or have already been transferred to an IP rights holder by court order. There were 32 of those in the last 12 months, half 2016 levels.

The separate, ludicrously onerous preemptive ban on domains that appear to encourage sexual violence resulted in just two suspensions in the last year, bringing the total new domains suspended under the rule since 2014 to just six.

Some poor bugger at Nominet had to trawl through 3,410 new registrations containing strings such as “rape” in 2017 to achieve that result, up from 2,407 last year.