Latest news of the domain name industry

Recent Posts

Afilias buys the other half of .global

Afilias has acquired one of its new gTLD back-end customers, Dot Global Domain Registry Limited, the registry for .global.

It immediately makes .global Afilias’ best-performing 2012-round new gTLD.

The price of the deal, between two private companies, was undisclosed.

As DI reported last November, Afilias already owned 45% of the company, which had 2017 revenue of $1.9 million and a $320,000 loss.

.global is a relatively good new gTLD business, as new gTLDs go.

We’re looking at a business with probably still low-seven-digit annual revenue, with annual adds and renewals trending upwards.

It had over 48,000 domain under management at the last count, with about about 22,500 annual renews.

The names renew at $100 at GoDaddy, which with 30% of .global regs is the largest .global registrar.

NameCheap, the second-largest registrar (with 11%), renews at about $65.

Anecdotally, it’s a new gTLD that I regularly come across in the wild, which is still relatively noteworthy. It’s often used by multinational companies for global gateway sites.

Afilias said that because .global already runs on its back-end, there won’t be any burdensome migration work for registrars, just some “paperwork will need to be updated”.

In terms of domains under management, .global immediately becomes Afilias’ highest-volume new gTLD (excluding pre-2012 .info, .pro and .mobi).

Its biggest 2012-round TLD, from the about 20 it owns, was .red, with around 34,000 DUM.

auDA reveals cut-off date for 2LD priority

Australian ccTLD manager auDA has revealed how old your .com.au domain has to be to qualify for priority registration of the matching second-level .au domain.

If you registered your current domain before February 4, 2018, you will get “category 1” priority. Names registered after that are considered “category 2”.

The categories will come into play when auDA makes direct 2LDs registrations available at some point in the fourth quarter this year.

Category 1 domain owners will have until April 20 next year to catch their match, then category 2 owners get until August 1.

It’s a much speedier process than the five-year grandfathering period Nominet offered in .uk domains.

After the priority periods are over, all unclaimed .au domains will be released to the available pool.

Brand owners, domain investors, and actually basically anyone who owns a .com.au or .org.au domain has a little over 13 months to make their mind up whether they want to run the risk of confusion with a third-party owner of a very similar domain.

Pricing is the same as third-level domains, so opting in to the 2LD basically doubles the price of participating in .au ownership.

auDA’s draft rules for the process can be read here (pdf).

Nic.br wins dot-brand from Afilias

Brazilian registry Nic.br has won its sixth gTLD client.

It’s taking on the dot-brand back-end business of Natura, a cosmetics company based in its home town of Sao Paulo.

The .natura gTLD was previously managed by Afilias.

I can’t imagine it’s a hugely valuable deal.

Natura has only a few domains in its zone. It’s using global.natura as a portal to its various national ccTLD sites and app.natura as a gateway to app stores where its mobile app can be obtained.

It’s the latest gTLD to change back-ends in the current wave of new gTLD rejiggering to come about as contracts negotiated during the 2012 application round start to expire.

Nic.br also runs the dot-brands .uol and .globo, the small city TLD .rio, the unlaunched generics .bom (means “good” in Portuguese) and .final, and of course its original ccTLD, .br.

.CLUB lowers premium prices to sell through registrars

.CLUB Domains has lowered the price of many of its reserved “premium” domain names in order to make them more easily available via the registrar channel, the company announced today.

Dozens of names previously priced above $20,000, and therefore only available via brokers, have been reduced to between $10,000 and $19,000, according to chief marketing officer Jeff Sass.

The company’s EPP system has tiered pricing and the top tier is $20,000, so registrars are not able to directly sell higher-priced names.

Sass said some of the repriced names include nyc.club, travellers.club, delivery.club, biking.club, fun.club, growth.club and home.club.

auDA chair racks off after just 18 months

Australian ccTLD manager auDA has lost its chair, again.

Chris Leptos quit abruptly, for undisclosed reasons, earlier this week.

He’d been in the job since November 2017, when he replaced Stuart Benjamin, who had resigned shortly before facing a no-confidence vote from members.

Leptos himself survived a similar attempted ousting last July, despite losing the “popular vote” of members.

auDA’s brief statement does not say why he’s resigned, but notably absent from the release is the usual set of boilerplate quotes talking up the successes of the departed’s tenure, which are pretty standard when a resignation is amicable.

Aussie domain blogger David Goldstein is reporting that Leptos had a disagreement about “governance issues” with CEO Cameron Boardman at a board meeting this week, which led to Leptos filing his resignation letter.

auDA has come under almost-daily criticism for the duration of Leptos’ spell in the chair. Many members are not happy with initiatives such as the registry back-end handover, the imminent release of second-level domains, and myriad general governance and transparency issues.

Leptos has been nothing if not confrontational in return.

During his tenure, a story alleging lavish spending by former directors (including one of auDA’s chief critics) was placed in the national media, and Leptos’ board referred an unspecified number to the Victoria Police.

Leptos has been replaced on an interim basis by Suzanne Ewart, an independent director, while his permanent replacement is sought.