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Three-letter .net leads as NamesCon charity auction raises €4,150 for Kenyan school

Kevin Murphy, June 8, 2018, Domain Sales

A domain auction at NamesCon Europe raised €4,150 for charity today.

A total of 22 domains were sold, each of which had been donated by a conference attendee.

The top sale was bbe.net, which went for €650, followed by xvs.net, which fetched €500.

The three-letter jjh.org went for €150, which some said was a bargain.

Also selling were smartphone.global and caring.global for €450 and €400 respectively.

The auction was organized by Shaun Wilkinson, COO of domain broker Nidoma, who wants to raise a total of €6,500 during NamesCon for the Hope Children’s Centre, which is trying to finish building a secondary school in Kenya.

Anyone wishing to help the charity reach its target can donate online here.

CentralNic spends $3.3 million on .com portfolios

Kevin Murphy, January 9, 2018, Domain Sales

CentralNic has splashed out £2.5 million ($3.3 million) to bolster its portfolio of domain names for the secondary market.

The company said in a brief statement today that it acquired an unspecified number of domains across “a number of portfolios”. The sellers were not disclosed.

The names were all in .com.

CEO Ben Crawford said the names were acquired “at an attractive discount to current market rates”.

The deals mean London-listed CentralNic might be able to continue to prop up its recurring revenue (registry/registrar) numbers through the sale of premium names, something it still needs to do if it wants to show investors a pleasing growth curve.

That’s assuming it can sell the names at a profit, of course.

Some call this the premium domain “hamster wheel”.

Kickstarter launches Patreon rival on .RIP domain hack

Kevin Murphy, November 15, 2017, Domain Sales

They’re deadly serious.

Crowdfunding service Kickstarter has relaunched its Drip subscriptions service on a .rip domain.

It’s a domain hack using a single-character domain: d.rip.

It’s actually a case of a migration away from a .com domain, which is not something you see every day from a major online brand.

Drip was acquired by Kickstarter from record company Ghostly International in 2012 and has had a relatively low-key presence at drip.kickstarter.com.

Rather than enabling creators to fund a project entirely in advance, with an “all-or-nothing” approach, it allows them to collect subscription fees from fans.

It’s aimed at musicians, podcasters, comedians, YouTubers and the like — people who need a way to support their work now that advertisers are increasingly wary of edgy online content.

The .rip gTLD was originally a Rightside domain. It’s now in the Donuts stable.

It was intended to stand for Rest In Peace, giving registrants a memorable name with which to memorialize the dead.

In reality, with under 3,000 names in its zone, it’s used for a wide variety of other purposes too. Some sites use it to represent “rip” as a verb, others use it to evoke a sense of horror.

As a single-character registry premium name, d.rip would not have been cheap. However, it would have been certainly a lot cheaper than Drip.com, which is in use by an email marketing company.

Uniregistry: sales prices down for “first time ever”

Kevin Murphy, September 19, 2017, Domain Sales

Uniregistry today said that it sold $29 million of domain names through its Uniregistry Market platform so far this year.

But the company said that average sales prices dipped for the “first time ever” over the period.

The 3,617 names it sold in the first eight months of the year went for on average $8,017 per domain, compared to $9,110 in the same 2016 period.

Average prices had been steadily rising since 2011, Uniregistry said in a press release. It blamed the reversal on “expansion into exploratory, nontraditional markets” — the mix leaning more towards new gTLDs and ccTLDs, in other words.

On the bright side, the total dollar value of sales were up to $29 million from the $25 million in the comparable period. Transactions were up 24%, the company said.

Eight months is an unusual period to report results for, making me wonder whether today’s statement is in response to some recent bad press, but as a private company I guess Uniregistry can report figures for whatever period it wishes.

The numbers, to reiterate, refer to its Uniregistry Market secondary sales platform, not its own cache of registry-reserved new gTLD domains.

Gay.com, “worth $7 million”, donated to gay blog

Kevin Murphy, August 7, 2017, Domain Sales

The domain name gay.com has reportedly been donated for free to a gay rights group despite claims it is worth $6.9 million.

The Los Angeles LGBT Center said late last week that it is to take ownership of the domain, which will direct visitors to a recently launched blog.

The Center says it is the world’s largest provider of services to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people.

The donation comes from VS Media, which acquired the domain last year and seems to run it as a community hub slash dating site. It runs an adult webcam site called Flirt4Free.

Gay.com apparently gets 200,000 visits per month.

According to the Center, gay.com will shortly begin pointing to a blog currently published at VanguardNow.org.

Chief marketing officer Jim Key said in a press release:

We’ve only just begun to think about future possibilities for the domain. But for now, the traffic from Gay.com to our new blog will help even more people learn how we’re building a world where LGBT people thrive as healthy, equal, and complete members of society.

The company decided to give the domain away to a worthy cause and invited five major gay charities to make proposals, the Center said.

The $6.9 million valuation comes from a VS Media appraisal, but does not seem to me like a hugely implausible number.

Whois records do not show a change of ownership recently, but the domain has been using a privacy service for some time so changes may not be obvious.