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Architelos goes flat-rate with NameSentry pricing

Architelos has introduced flat-rate pricing for its flagship NameSentry abuse detection and mitigation service.

Now, TLD registries will be able to pay $389 a month for the Basic service and $689 for the Enterprise version, regardless of the size of their zones.

Previously, pricing ranged from $249 to $3,999 per month, depending on zone size.

NameSentry scans and collates various malware, spam and phishing URL lists in order to alert registries when domains in their TLDs are being used for different types of online abuse.

The primary difference between the Basic and Enterprise versions is the ability to automate remediation workflow.

NameSentry customers include Donuts and Rightside. Architelos reckons it has 44% of the new gTLD market using the service.

Glitch takes out ICANN’s zone file service

Kevin Murphy, April 30, 2014, Domain Services

A bug which gave elevated privileges to new gTLD registries has taken out ICANN’s Centralized Zone Data Service for the best part of a day.

CZDS is the central clearinghouse for zone file data access requests. All new gTLD registries must participate. DI uses the data provided via the service to calculate registration numbers.

The service was turned off yesterday after registries noticed that they were able to view and approve pending requests made to rival registries and informed ICANN.

The site has been “currently undergoing maintenance” since at least 0200 UTC today. The bug was present from at least 2100 on Monday night, which was when I first heard about it.

ICANN tells me the move to take down the site yesterday was made out of “an abundance of caution” and that its techies are looking at the issue right now.

Talking to a few registries, it seems they were given super-user privileges.

They were able to review requests for zone file access made by users like DI to any new gTLD registry. They would have been able to approve such requests, registries tell me.

The contact information of the requesting party was also visible, they tell me.

I think in most cases this isn’t a big deal. I assume most CZDS users just blanket-request every file from every gTLD registry, but there could hypothetically be edge cases where a sensitive request was exposed.

For the avoidance of confusion, the bug would not have given anyone the ability to edit any zone files. CZDS is just a publishing clearinghouse, it has no functional role in the DNS.

Two other ICANN sites, the Global Domains Division portal and parts of MyICANN, both of which run on the Force.com platform, also currently appear to be down for maintenance, but it’s not currently clear if these issues are related.

Rook Media acquires DomainSponsor

Kevin Murphy, April 22, 2014, Domain Services

Oversee.net surprised many in the domainer community yesterday when it announced the sale of its flagship parking service, DomainSponsor, to upstart rival Rook Media.

The deal, for an undisclosed sum, means Oversee, once the parent to brands such as Moniker and SnapNames, now barely has a presence in the domain name industry at all.

Switzerland-based Rook Media, describing itself as “Europe’s largest domain monetization platform”, was formed three years ago by former NameDrive and Sedo executives.

US-based DomainSponsor, on the other hand, has been around since 2002.

Rook CEO Ash Rahimi told Domain Name Wire yesterday that both platforms will operate independently for the foreseeable future.

Oversee said in a press release that it will “now focus on more aggressively developing its growth businesses” which comprise web sites in travel, consumer finance and retail.

The company sold off Moniker and SnapNames to KeyDrive in 2012. KeyDrive has since sold on SnapNames to Web.com.

Oversee still has the DomainFest conference listed as one of its brands on its web site. Other than that, there seems to be little left of its presence in the domain industry.

Over half a million Trademark Claims notices served

Kevin Murphy, March 25, 2014, Domain Services

The Trademark Clearinghouse has delivered over 500,000 Trademark Claims notices and prevented over 475,000 trademarked names from being registered, according to the TMCH.

The 500,000 number announced in a press release today seems to refer to pre-registration warnings that the name about to be registered matches a trademark in the TMCH database.

Three weeks ago the TMCH said it had served 17,500 post-registration notices to trademark owners in just one month. I’m inferring that this number is now up to over 25,000.

Half a million appears to be an awfully big number, especially when compared to the number of active domain names in new gTLDs, which today stands at just over 347,000.

The TMCH said today that 95% of these notices led to the name not being registered, which it said shows the success of the Claims system.

It could also mean that it’s having the “chilling effect” predicted by opponents of the process, with legitimate registrants being scared away from non-infringing uses of registered marks.

There are plenty of dictionary words in the Clearinghouse — some that match legitimate brands, some which are simply attempts to game sunrise periods and obtain potentially valuable names.

There are currently over 28,000 marks in the TMCH database.

Van Gelder rebrands to Milathan

Kevin Murphy, March 5, 2014, Domain Services

Domain name consultant Stephane Van Gelder has changed the name of his company from Stephane Van Gelder Consulting to Milathan.

The name, Van Gelder tells us, is a “derivative of words in Hindi that mean ‘union’ or ‘meeting’ in the sense of bringing people together”.

Milathan’s tagline will be “Internet Intelligence – Strategic Advice”.

Van Gelder is co-founder of the French registrar Indom but left in 2012 after the sale of the company to Group NBT in 2010.