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Direct .au regs closer to reality

Kevin Murphy, August 20, 2015, Domain Registries

Australians could soon get the ability to register domain names directly under .au for the first time.

Following in the footsteps of the UK and New Zealand, a panel of .au policy body auDA has recommended that the second level should be opened up for registrations, pending further consultation.

In a consultation paper (pdf), the panel wrote:

direct registrations would create names which are shorter, more appealing and more memorable. They would make the domain name system simpler and easier to use. Moreover, the proposed change would open a wide range of new choices for registrants, and would provide a better option, especially for some groups; in particular, the Panel thinks that the biggest benefit will be for individuals, who would be able to obtain an Australian domain name in a simple and straightforward way.

Trademark owners need to pay attention, because the panel has recommended that the release does not include a sunrise period, due to .au’s “no hierarchy of rights” principle.

But the panel is recommending that existing .au registrants should get first dibs on matching second-level names.

Unlike the UK, where registrants had preference over registrants in other SLDs, the auDA panel says owners would not be treated any differently to, for example, owners.

The panel has also raised the idea of implementing ICANN’s Uniform Rapid Suspension policy.

Registry providers might want to take note that the panel says that .au back-end AusRegistry, now part of Neustar, will not automatically get the contract to run the direct .au registry; an RFP may be in auDA’s future.

The recommendations are now open for comment until September 30.

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ZACR hits a million .za names

Kevin Murphy, August 20, 2015, Domain Registries

South Africa’s .za ccTLD has crossed the one million domain mark, according to the registry.

ZA Central Registry is currently reporting on its web site that 1,000,666 names have been registered.

The millionth name was reportedly, registered to a consulting firm and inexplicably redirecting to the typo

CEO Lucky Masilela reportedly said: “ZACR has now joined a small group of registry operators worldwide who administer a six-figure domain space.”

So perhaps the numbers the company are reporting are not entirely reliable. [/snark]

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Registrants guilty until proven innocent, say UK cops

Kevin Murphy, August 19, 2015, Domain Registrars

UK police have stated an eyebrow-raising “guilty until proven innocent” point of view when it comes to domain name registrations, in comments filed recently with ICANN.

In a Governmental Advisory Committee submission (pdf) to a review of the Whois accuracy rules in the Registrar Accreditation Agreement, unspecified “UK law enforcement” wrote:

Internet governance efforts by Industry, most notably the ICANN 2013 RAA agreement have seen a paradigm shift in Industry in the way a domain name is viewed as “suspicious” before being validated as “good” within the 15 day period of review.

UK law enforcement’s view is that a 45 day period would revert Industry back to a culture of viewing domains “good” until they are proven “bad” therefore allowing crime to propagate and increase harm online.

The GAC submission was made August 13 to a public comment period that closed July 3.

The Whois Accuracy Program Specification Review had proposed a number of measures to bring more clarity to registrars under the 2013 RAA.

One such measure, proposed by the registrars, was to change the rules so that registrars have an extra 30 days — 45 instead of 15 — to validate registrants’ contact information before suspending the domain.

That’s what the UK cops — and the GAC as a whole — don’t like.

They have a point, of course. Criminals often register domains with bogus contact information with the expectation that the domains will not have a long shelf life. Fifteen days is actually quite generous if you want to stop phishing attacks, say.

The Anti-Phishing Working Group says phishing attacks have an average up-time of 29 hours.

Clearly, ICANN’s Whois accuracy program is doing little to prevent phishing as it is; a switch to 45 days would presumably have little impact.

But the number of domains suspended for lack of accuracy at any given time is estimated to be in the hundreds of thousands, and registrars say it’s mostly innocent registrants who are affected.

Verisign said this March that .com domains “on hold” grew from roughly 394,000 names at the end of 2013 to about 870,000 at the end of 2014.

In June 2014, registrars claimed that over 800,000 domains had been suspended for want of Whois accuracy in the first six months the policy was in place.

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Kevin Murphy, August 19, 2015, Domain Registrars

The credit card details of 93,000 customers have been stolen by hackers.

The name, address and credit card number of the affected customers were accessed. The verification numbers (from the back of the cards) were not stolen. said the attack was discovered August 13 and has been reported to the proper authorities.

Network Solutions and, its leading registrar businesses, were not affected, the company said.

It has 3.3 million customers. Those whose details were stolen have been emailed and will receive a letter in the mail.

The company said it will provide affected customers with a year of free credit monitoring.

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Radix targets 25,000 names for .online’s first day

Kevin Murphy, August 18, 2015, Domain Registries

Radix Registry reckons .online will move at least 15,000 domains in its first day of general availability, but it’s aiming higher.

“We are confident .online will be amongst the biggest new gTLDs that have launched,” Radix business head Sandeep Ramchandani said in a press release today.

“The same sentiment across several Registrar Partners has reinforced our beliefs. We expect to start off with at least 15,000 registrations at launch and would love to break .club’s launch record,” he said.

When .CLUB Domains launched .club in 2014, its zone file showed over 25,000 domains after the first 10 hours.

Radix is basing its projections not only on its registrar conversations, but also on .online’s sunrise period, which ended yesterday with 775 sales.

That number is of course low by pre-2012 standards, but it’s in the top tier of sunrise periods for non-controversial new gTLDs.

The only strings to top 1,000 names to date have been ICM Registry’s .porn and .adult and Vox Populi’s .sucks.

.CLUB’s sunrise weighed in at 454 domains.

Radix had better hope .online is successful — the gTLD sold for seven or eight figures at private auction.

The gTLD will go to its Early Access Period tomorrow before settling down to regular pricing August 26.

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