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ICANN director Burr leaving Neustar

Kevin Murphy, February 11, 2019, Domain Registries

Neustar is losing its chief privacy officer, Becky Burr, who also sits on ICANN’s board of directors.

Burr, a lawyer, said last week that she’s decided to return to private practice after almost seven years at the registry.

Her last day will be March 1, but she’ll continue to advise the company as outside counsel on issues such as privacy and .us policy.

Lips are sealed on her exact destination, but it’s apparently small, Washington, DC-based, and focused on data protection.

Prior to Neustar, Burr worked for the law firm Wilmer Hale. Prior to that, she was in the US National Telecommunications and Information Administration, where she helped create ICANN 20 years ago.

Despite no longer being directly employed by a registry or registrar, Burr said she’s hoping to be reelected to the ICANN board, where she represents the Contracted Parties House, when her current term expires at the end of the year.

In addition to .us, Neustar runs .co, .biz and acts as back-end for dozens of other TLDs.

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Right of the colon? IDN getting killed over dot confusion

Kevin Murphy, February 11, 2019, Domain Registries

An internationalized domain name ccTLD is reportedly getting buried because of a confusion about how many dots should appear.

Armenia’s .հայ (.xn--y9a3aq) today has fewer than 300 registered domains, well under 1% of the volume enjoyed by the Latin-script .am, apparently due to a unique quirk of the Armenian language.

According to a report in the local tech press, sourcing a registry VP, .հայ domains are not working because of how the Armenian script uses punctuation.

In Armenian, a full-stop or period is represented by two vertically aligned dots called a verjaket that looks pretty much identical to a colon in English and other Latin-based languages.

A single dot, looking and positioned exactly like a Latin period, is called a mijaket and is used in the same way English and other languages use a colon.

It’s not entirely clear whether the problem lies with the user, the keyboards, the browsers, or elsewhere, but it’s plain to see how confusion could arise when you have Armenian-script characters on both sides of a Latin-script dot.

The registry, ISOC Armenia, is today reporting just 298 .հայ domains, compared to 34,354 .am domains.

The Latin-script ccTLD has benefited in the past from its association elsewhere with AM radio. It’s also sometimes used as a domain hack, including by Instagram’s URL shortener.

It’s probably worth noting that while Armenia seems to have a unique problem, it’s far from unusual for an IDN ccTLD to perform poorly against its Latin stablemate.

.հայ, which transliterates to “.hay”, is an abbreviation of the Armenian name for Armenia, Հայաստան or “Hayastan”. It was delegated by ICANN in 2015 as part of its IDN ccTLD fast-track program.

Armenian has fewer than seven million speakers worldwide. Armenia has roughly three million inhabitants.

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Despite Afilias lawsuit, Neustar names date for Indian takeaway

Kevin Murphy, February 7, 2019, Domain Registries

Neustar has named the date for the transition of the .in registry away from incumbent Afilias..

It’s due to happen February 28, according to a new web site the company has set up to publicize the handover.

The registry will be down for up to 48 hours, starting from 1830 UTC, February 17, as a result.

There will be no new adds, and registrants won’t be able to update their domains, during the downtime. DNS will not be affected, so domains should still resolve.

Neustar won the back-end contract from .in manager NIXI last year, out from under Afilias, after reportedly undercutting Afilias’ $1.10 per-domain-per-year bid with a $0.70 bid of its own.

Given the 2.2 million domains in .in, that makes the contract worth about $7.7 million over its five-year duration.

The transition appears to be going ahead despite a lawsuit filed by Afilias against the Indian government last August, which sought to block the deal.

According to Neustar, the contract was awarded, regardless, last September.

But the lawsuit seems to be still active, judging by the latest filings published on the Delhi High Court web site, which show no judgement has yet been filed.

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Endurance domain revenue dips

Kevin Murphy, February 7, 2019, Domain Registrars

Endurance International put in a poor show when it came to domains name sales in 2018.

Revenue and average revenue per registrant were both down in the fourth quarter and full-year results, which were announced this morning.

Endurance’s registrar business includes BigRock, Domain.com, FastDomain, PublicDomainRegistry.com and others.

Combined, those four brands account for almost 10 million gTLD domains under management, but that number has also been heading south recently.

The company said today that its fourth-quarter domain revenue was $31.3 million, down from $33 million a year earlier. It had 666,000 domain subscribers at the end of the quarter, down from 683,000.

Average revenue per subscriber for the quarter was also down, from $16.63 to $15.63.

For the full year, revenue was down from $133.6 million to $129.9 million and average revenue per subscriber was down from $16.98 to $16.05.

The shrinkage is reflected in the latest transaction reports filed with ICANN, too.

In October, the most recently reported month, all four of Endurance’s biggest registrar brands shrunk in terms of DUM.

PDR was the biggest loser — actually topping the list of shrinking registrars — shedding over 76,000 gTLD domains, over 10,000 of which was from net transfers.

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After ICANN knockback, Amazon countries agree to .amazon talks

Kevin Murphy, February 4, 2019, Domain Policy

Talks that could lead to Amazon finally getting its long-sought .amazon gTLD are back on, after a dispute between ICANN and eight South American governments.

The Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization last week invited ICANN CEO Goran Marby to meet ACTO members in Brasilia, any day next week.

It’s not clear whether Amazon representatives have also been invited.

The outreach came despite, or possibly because of, ICANN’s recent rejection of an ACTO demand that the .amazon gTLD applications be returned to their old “Will Not Proceed” status.

In rejecting ACTO’s Request for Reconsideration, ICANN’s board of directors had stressed that putting .amazon back in the evaluation stream was necessary in order to negotiate contractual concessions that would benefit ACTO.

Amazon is said to have agreed to some Public Interest Commitments that ACTO would be able to enforce via ICANN’s PIC Dispute Resolution Process.

The e-commerce giant is also known to have offered ACTO cultural safeguards and financial sweeteners.

ACTO’s decision to return to the negotiating table may have been made politically less uncomfortable due to a recent change in its leadership.

Secretary-general Jacqueline Mendoza, who had held the pen on a series of hard-line letters to Marby, was in January replaced by Bolivian politician Alexandra Moreira after her three-year term naturally came to an end.

ICANN’s board has said it will look at .amazon again at its meetings in Kobe, Japan, in March.

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