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NABP discloses premium .pharmacy pricing

Kevin Murphy, November 18, 2014, Domain Registries

The National Association of Boards of Pharmacy has revealed its premium pricing structure for the new gTLD .pharmacy, in launch policy documents filed with ICANN.

The registry, which stood unopposed for .pharmacy, plans to have three standard tiers of pricing for its premiums — $750, $2,500 and $10,000. A fourth “Gold” tier will have prices set by the market, presumably via negotiation or auction.

Following the lead of many other new gTLD registries, the annual renewal fee will match the price paid for the initial registration.

The organization, which sets standards for pharmacies in the US, Canada and Australia, is planning no fewer than nine launch phases, running from today, when NABP members grab their names, to June 2 next year, when general availability starts.

The gTLD is to be restricted to pharmacies and related industries, so the Sunrise period will be restricted to trademarks listed in the Trademark Clearinghouse whose owners fit the criteria.

Users of the NABP’s various accreditation programs will get a crack at names following Sunrise. Then, dispensing pharmacies that are not accredited get a shot.

The gTLD was originally applied for partially defensively — to keep the string out of the hands of others — and the launch policies reflect that level of caution about making sure only organizations the NABP wants to get names get names.

Amusingly, the NABP has chosen a .net domain for its own official web site — dotpharmacy.net.

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IP Mirror rapped for failing to deal with abuse

Kevin Murphy, November 17, 2014, Domain Registrars

Here’s something you don’t see every day: a corporate brand management registrar getting smacked by an ICANN breach notice.

Singapore-based registrar IP Mirror has been sent a warning by ICANN Compliance about a failure to respond to abuse complaints filed by law enforcement, which appears to be another first.

Under the 2013 Registrar Accreditation Agreement, registrars are obliged to have a 24/7 abuse hotline to field complaints from “law enforcement, consumer protection, quasi-governmental or other similar authorities” designated by the governments of places where they have a physical office.

According to its web site, IP Mirror has offices in Singapore, Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, Taiwan and the UK, but ICANN’s breach notice does not specify which authority filed the complaint or which domains were allegedly abusive.

Registrars have to respond to such complaints within 24 hours, the RAA says.

The ICANN notice (pdf) takes the company to task for alleged breaches of other related parts of the RAA, such as failure to retain records about complaints and to publish an abuse contact on its web site.

The company has been given until December 5 to come back into compliance or risk losing its accreditation.

IP Mirror isn’t massive in terms of gTLD names. According to the latest registry reports it has somewhere in the region of 30,000 gTLD domains under management.

But it is almost 15 years old and establishment enough that it has been known to sponsor the occasional ICANN meeting. It’s not your typical Compliance target.

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Millions of new gTLD domains to be released as collision blocks end

Kevin Murphy, November 17, 2014, Domain Registries

Millions of new gTLD domain names are set to start being released, as ICANN-mandated name collision blocks start getting lifted.

Starting yesterday, domains that have been blocked from registration due to name collisions can now be released by the registries.

About 95,000 names in gTLDs such as .nyc, .tattoo, .webcam and .wang have already ended their mandatory “controlled interruption” period and hundreds of thousands more are expected to be unblocked on a weekly basis over the coming months (and years).

Want to register sex.nyc, poker.bid or garage.capetown? That may soon be possible. Those names, along with hundreds of other non-gibberish domains, are no longer subject to mandatory blocks.

Roughly 45 new gTLDs have ended their CI periods over the last two days. Here are the Latin-script ones:

.bid, .buzz, .cancerresearch, .capetown, .caravan, .cologne, .cymru, .durban, .gent, .jetzt, .joburg, .koeln, .krd, .kred, .lacaixa, .nrw, .nyc, .praxi, .qpon, .quebec, .ren, .ruhr, .saarland, .wang, .webcam, .whoswho, .wtc, .citic, .juegos, .luxury, .menu, .monash, .physio, .reise, .tattoo, .tirol, .versicherung, .vlaanderen and .voting

Another half dozen or so non-Latin script gTLDs have also finished with CI.

There are over 17,500 newly unblocked names in .nyc alone. Over the whole new gTLD program, over 9.8 million name collisions are to be temporarily blocked.

Name collisions are domains in new gTLDs that were already receiving DNS root traffic well before the gTLD was delegated, suggesting that they may be in use on internal networks.

To avoid possible harm from collisions, ICANN forced registries to make these names unavailable for registration and to resolve to the deliberately non-functional and odd-looking IP address 127.0.53.53.

Each affected name had to be treated in this way for 90 days. The first TLDs started implementing CI on August 18, so the first batch of registries ended their programs yesterday.

So, will every domain that was on a registry’s collision list be available to buy right away?

No.

ICANN hasn’t told registries that they must release names as soon as their CI period is over, so it appears to be at the registries’ discretion when the names are released. I gather some intend to do so as soon as today.

Also, any name that was blocked due to a collision and also appears in the Trademark Clearinghouse will have to remain blocked until it has been subject to a Sunrise period.

Some registries, such as Donuts, have already made their collision names available (but not activated in the DNS) under their original Sunrise periods so will be able to release unclaimed names at the same time as all the rest.

Other registries will have to talk to ICANN about a secondary sunrise period, to give trademark holders their first chance to grab the previously blocked names.

Furthermore, domains that the registry planned to reserved as “premiums” will continue to be reserved as premiums.

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“Second most marketable athlete in the world” to use a .club domain

Kevin Murphy, November 17, 2014, Domain Registries

Virat Kohli, a famous Indian cricketer, is .CLUB Domains’ latest star anchor tenant.

He’s launching his first ever official web site, at viratkohli.club, today.

No, I’ve never heard of him either, but he’s been called the “second most marketable athlete in the world” after Lewis Hamilton by SportsPro, a UK sports marketing business-to-business magazine.

The 26-year-old has captained the Indian national side and holds various records in the world of cricket.

Just yesterday, he became “the first batsman to score 1000 ODI runs in a calendar year for four years in a row”, which is probably very impressive if you know what it means.

He has almost 4.5 million Twitter followers and over 18 million Facebook “likes”, which means his links to his new site, should he choose to post any, will reach a wide audience in nations where cricket is popular.

His adoption of .club, which seems to be a result of a deal with .CLUB, follows the launch of 50 Cent’s 50inda.club. Singer Demi Lovato also has a .club for her official site, apparently purchased of her own volition.

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$10 million to move to a dot-brand? Quebec says “non”

Kevin Murphy, November 17, 2014, Domain Registries

One of the biggest hypothetical barriers to the adoption of dot-brand gTLDs has always been the likely cost of migration, but until now nobody’s really thrown around any figures.

The Government of Quebec has decided against rebranding to the forthcoming .quebec gTLD, saying the migration would cost it CAD 12 million ($10.6 million), according to local reports.

The Canadian Press press reported over the weekend that Quebec will still to its existing gouv.qc.ca addresses and therefore save itself a bundle of cash at a time when austerity measures are in place.

The timing of the revelation is unfortunate for PointQuebec, the .quebec registry, which is due to go to general availability tomorrow.

The application for .quebec, a protected geographic string under ICANN rules, was made with the support of the Canadian province.

The decision by the government is not a death sentence for the gTLD, but it is the loss of a significant anchor tenant at the worst possible moment.

It also highlights what we all already knew — for a large organization, changing your domain name is complicated and expensive.

Not only do myriad IT systems need to be migrated to the new domain, you also need to think about things as trivial as letter heads and signage.

The cost of such a switch is a key reason we’re unlikely to see many dot-brand owners making a full-scale switch to their new gTLD in the short term.

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