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NamesCon will be biggest new gTLD show yet

Kevin Murphy, January 8, 2014, Domain Services

The inaugural NamesCon new gTLDs conference, set to run for three days in Las Vegas next week, has attracted roughly 525 registrations, making it the largest such event to date.

Organizers are speculating that the final tally of attendees could pass 600, despite the fact that early bird pricing ended last night and tickets went up $200 to $599.

All of the previous new gTLD conferences I’m aware of — .nxt, gTLD World Congress, newdomains.org and a handful of smaller ones — have struggled to get half that number of delegates.

I suspect that the relatively low cost of tickets, hotel rooms and flights will have something to do with the relatively high participation for an as-yet unproven event.

According to organizers, there are about 100 speakers/panelists and 30 sessions over the two full days of the conference.

With just 45 minutes scheduled for most sessions, and five speakers on many of the panels, moderators will have their work cut out making sure discussions are balanced yet focused.

I will be on two panels, “Meet the industry Press” and “Important Tools of the Industry”, both of which are on Wednesday afternoon.

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New gTLD launches: registrar coverage at less than 40% of the market

Kevin Murphy, January 7, 2014, Domain Registrars

Registrars representing less than 40% of the gTLD market are ready to offer new gTLDs during their launch phases, according to the latest stats from ICANN.

ICANN released yesterday a list (pdf) of the just 21 registrars that have signed the 2013 Registrar Accreditation Agreement and have been certified by IBM to use the Trademark Clearinghouse database.

Signing the 2013 RAA is a requirement for registrars that want to sell new gTLDs. Almost 150 registrars are currently on the new contract.

But being certified for the TMCH is also a requirement to sell names during the first 90 days of each new gTLD’s general availability, when the Trademark Claims service is running.

Together, the 21 registrars that have done both accounted for 59 million registered gTLD domain names (using August’s official numbers), which translated to 39.5% of the gTLD market.

It’s a high percentage due to the presence of Go Daddy, with its 48.2 million gTLD names. The only other top-10 registrar on the list is 1&1.

Twelve of the 21 registrars on the list had fewer than 40,000 names under management. A couple have fewer than 100.

Only one new gTLD, dotShabaka Registry’s شبكة., is currently in its Trademark Claims period.

The second batch, comprising Donuts’ first seven launches, isn’t due to hit until January 27, giving just a few weeks for the certified list to swell.

There’ll be 33 new gTLD in Claims by the end of February.

The rate at which new registrars are being certified by IBM is not especially encouraging either. Only four have been added in the last month.

Some registrars may of course choose to work via other registrars, as a reseller, rather than getting certified and doing the TMCH integration work themselves.

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gTLD market passes 150 million names

Kevin Murphy, January 7, 2014, Domain Registries

There were over 150 million domain names registered in gTLDs at the end of September, according to the latest registry reports.

The exact number, across all 18 gTLDs that file registry reports, was 150,173,219 as of September 30.

As you might expect, .com accounts for the vast majority — just over 113 million — with .net a distant second with 15.5 million.

Five gTLDs were shrinking when compared to August: .info, .pro, .asia, .tel and .museum.

Neustar’s .biz was growing fastest sequentially in percentage terms, its 2.65 million domains up over 7% on August numbers.

Here’s the full table of September’s numbers:

TLDDUMDUM ChangeDUM Change %
com113,008,994475,4250.42%
net15,498,04429,5880.19%
org10,346,43916,9130.16%
info6,158,549-89,319-1.43%
biz2,659,252175,8187.08%
mobi1,164,44420,0901.76%
asia508,491-4,911-0.96%
name214,6292,1591.02%
tel191,544-2,048-1.06%
pro150,913-6,090-3.88%
xxx121,4742640.22%
cat69,0014050.59%
jobs44,356710.16%
travel20,180770.38%
aero8,868660.75%
coop7,596190.25%
museum432-1-0.23%
post1300.00%

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Donuts picks young British firm for Sunrise disputes

Kevin Murphy, January 6, 2014, Domain Services

A newish UK company managed by some old internet policy hands has been appointed by Donuts to handle disputes arising from its Sunrise and Domain Protected Marks List policies.

Oxford-based Synetergy, which says it worked with Interconnect Comunications on new gTLD evaluations, is managed by Emily Taylor (formerly of Nominet) and Tony Holmes (formerly of BT).

The company will handle Donuts’ Sunrise and DPML Dispute Resolution Policy, which ICANN published (pdf) today.

The policy comes into play whenever somebody suspects that a Sunrise registration or DPML block in a Donuts gTLD was made based on a bogus trademark submission.

The price of filing a complaint under the process is £250 for up to five names registered to the same registrant.

Taylor said that IP experts from Sipara will handle the substantive evaluations, with Synetergy administering the process.

United TLD, the Demand Media/Rightside new gTLD applicant subsidiary, is also using Synetergy for its dispute resolution services, Taylor said.

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Latest Go Daddy phishing attack unrelated to 2013 RAA

Kevin Murphy, January 6, 2014, Domain Registrars

Fears that the 2013 Registrar Accreditation Agreement would lead to new phishing attacks appear to be unfounded, at least so far.

The 2013 RAA, which came into force at most of the big registrars on January 1, requires registrars to verify the registrant’s email address or phone number whenever a new name is registered.

It was long predicted that this new provision — demanded by law enforcement — would lead to phishers exploiting registrant confusion, obtaining login credentials, and stealing valuable domain names.

Over the weekend, it looked like this prediction had come true, with posts over at DNForum saying that a new Go Daddy scam was doing the rounds and reports that it was related to the 2013 RAA changes.

I disagree. Shane Cultra posted a screenshot of the latest scam on his blog, alongside a screenshot of Go Daddy’s actual verification email, and the two are completely dissimilar.

The big giveaways are the “Whois Data Reminder” banner and “Reminder to verify the accuracy of Whois data” subject line.

The new attack is not exploiting the new 2013 RAA Whois verification requirements, it’s exploiting the 10-year-old Whois Data Reminder Policy, which requires registrars annually to remind their customers to keep their contact details accurate.

In fact, the language of the new scam has been used in phishing attacks against registrants since at least 2010.

That’s not to say the attack is harmless, of course — the attacker is still going to steal the contents of your Go Daddy account if you fall for it.

We probably will see attacks specifically targeting confusion about the new address verification policy in future, but it seems to me that the confusion we’re seeing with the latest scam may be coincidental.

Go Daddy told DI yesterday that the scam site in question had already been shut down. It’s not clear if anyone fell for it while it was live.

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