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Kevin Murphy, March 31, 2011, Domain Services

Too many ideas, not enough time.

These are some of the stories I would have covered today, if only there were more hours in the day.

Joan Rivers dies after head transplant surgery

UK government banishes cybercrime sites to .au

Transparency review calls for ICANN reality show

UDRP panelist returns Taiwan to China

Bob Parsons shoots BigJumbo CEO

“Pigeon shit” blamed for Playboy plague

Hank Alvarez named ICANN compliance chief

Constantine Roussos says DNS needs “more cowbell”

NATO apologizes for Bit.ly bombing

Blacknight unveils leprechaun mascot

RIAA says .so domains “haven for piracy”

DomainTools merges with DomainJerks

BBC to apply for .cotton

ICANN successfully delays heat death of universe

Parsons apologizes, resurrects elephant

There’s at least 15 stupidly obscure in-jokes there. Probably more. How many did you “get” without Googling?

15 – Congratulations! You’re me. Or a potential future spouse. Call me!

10-14 – You truly are a domain name industry nerd, the depth and breadth of your knowledge covering both domaining and ICANN politicking. You’ve probably been to ICANN meetings and DomainFest. You should be both immensely proud and profoundly ashamed of yourself.

6-10 – I’m proud to have you as a reader. You’re exactly the type of well-balanced individual I’m hoping to attract to this site. Why not try visiting one of my advertisers and purchasing something?

1-5 – Must try harder! Your insight into the industry is sadly lacking. Perhaps consider subscribing to my RSS and Twitter feeds, which can be found at at the top of the left-hand sidebar, in order to bulk up your knowledge base.

0 — You appear to have visited this blog by mistake. Were you searching for “group porn”? I get a lot of hits for that. Nothing to see here, please move along.

VeriSign’s upcoming battle for the Chinese .com

Kevin Murphy, February 16, 2011, Domain Registries

Could VeriSign be about to face off against China for control of the Chinese version of .com? That’s an intriguing possibility that was raised during the .nxt conference last week.

Almost as an aside, auDA chief Chris Disspain mentioned during a session that he believes there are moves afoot in China to apply to ICANN for “company”, “network” and “organization” in Chinese characters. In other words, .com, .net and .org.

I’ve been unable to find an official announcement of any such Chinese application, but I’m reliably informed that Noises Have Been Made.

VeriSign has for several quarters been open about its plans to apply for IDN equivalents of its two flagship TLDs, and PIR’s new CEO Brian Cute recently told me he wants to do the same for .org.

While neither company has specified which scripts they’re looking at, Chinese is a no-brainer. As of this week, the nation is the world’s second-largest economy, and easily its most populous.

Since we’re already speculating, let’s speculate some more: who would win the Chinese .com under ICANN’s application rules, VeriSign or China?

If the two strings were close enough to wind up in a contention set, could VeriSign claim intellectual property rights, on the basis of its .com business? It seems like a stretch.

Could China leapfrog to the end of the process with a community application and a demand for a Community Priority Evaluation?

That also seems like a stretch. It’s not impossible – there’s arguably a “community” of companies registered with the Chinese government – but such a move would likely stink of gaming.

Is there a technical stability argument to be made? Is 公司. (which Google tells me means “company” in Chinese) confusingly similar to .com?

If these TLDs went to auction, one thing is certain: there are few potential applicants with deeper pockets than VeriSign, but China is one of them.

UPDATE: VeriSign’s Pat Kane was good enough to post a lengthy explanation of the company’s IDN strategy in the comments.

Olympics tells ICANN to abandon new TLD launch or get sued

Kevin Murphy, November 29, 2010, Domain Registries

The International Olympic Committee has threatened to sue ICANN unless it gives IOC trademarks special protection in its new top-level domains program.

The IOC’s critique of ICANN’s new Applicant Guidebook is the first to be filed by a major organization in the current public comment period.

The organization has accused ICANN of ignoring it, preferring instead to take its policy cues from the domain name industry, and said it should “abandon its current timeline” for the launch.

ICANN currently plans to start accepting TLD applications May 30, 2011.

Calling the guidebook “inherently flawed”, the IOC’s director general Urs Lacotte wrote:

If these critical issues are not fully resolved and ICANN chooses not to place the Olympic trademarks on the reserved names list, then the IOC and its National Olympic Committees are prepared to employ all available legislative, regulatory, administrative and judicial mechanisms to hold ICANN accountable for damage caused to the Olympic movement.

(That language looks like it could have been cut-n-paste from a separate letter from the financial services industry, which I reported on last week).

The IOC said that it has opposed the new TLD program 11 times – asking for its trademarks to be placed on the AGB’s reserved strings lists, but received no response.

Special pleading? Perhaps, but the IOC’s trademarks are already specifically protected by legislation in numerous countries, including the US, UK, Canada and China.

The IOC also wants stronger trademark protection mechanisms, such as mandatory typosquatting protections in sunrise periods and extending dispute proceedings to registrars.

Expect many more such missives to start showing up on the ICANN web site over the next 11 days before the ICANN board of directors meets to approve the AGB in Cartagena.

This may be the last chance many organizations get to ask for the changes they want in the AGB before the first round of new TLD applications opens, and I expect them to seize it with both hands.

Register.com settles Baidu domain hijacking lawsuit

Kevin Murphy, November 25, 2010, Domain Registrars

Register.com has apologised to Chinese portal company Baidu for allowing its domain, baidu.com, to be hijacked by the Iranian Cyber Army hacker group.

The two companies have announced that the lawsuit, which alleged gross negligence among other things, has now been settled. Terms were not disclosed.

If Baidu’s complaint was to be believed, the hackers took over baidu.com with a trivial social engineering attack that relied upon a Register.com tech support employee being asleep at the wheel.

The company is one of China’s largest internet firms, employing over 6,000 people and turning over well over $600 million a year. But for the period of the hijack, visitors to baidu.com instead just saw the hackers’ defacement message instead.

The registrar had argued in court that its terms and conditions released it from liability, but the judge didn’t buy it.

Register.com, which was acquired by Web.com for $135 million in June, said yesterday:

After an internal investigation, we found that the breach occurred because Register’s security protocols had been compromised. We have worked with United States law enforcement officials and Baidu to address the issue. We sincerely apologize to Baidu for the disruption that occurred to its services as a result of this incident.

Baidu said it accepted the apology. And the check, I imagine.