What the UN’s latest demands mean for new gTLD applicants

Kevin Murphy
July 23, 2012
Analysis

The United Nations has stepped up its campaign to have the names and acronyms of hundreds of Intergovernmental Organizations (IGOs) granted special protections under ICANN’s new gTLD program, putting several first-round applications at direct risk of rejection.

According to DI PRO’s analysis, if the UN’s proposals – which are supported by 38 IGOs – are adopted by ICANN precisely as demanded, at least four current new gTLD applications would be rejected outright, dozens more could be at risk of failing string similarity reviews, and dictionary words could be banned from future rounds.

Disturbingly for many applicants, noises from the Governmental Advisory Committee lately suggest that this scenario may not be as unlikely as it first appeared when the IGO demands surfaced late last year.

This article explains the current proposals to reserve more strings in the new gTLD program, examines the current state of policy-making, and provides three spreadsheets of strings and gTLD applications potentially affected by the debate.

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20 new gTLD applications that think they’re not geographic, but are

Kevin Murphy
July 2, 2012
Analysis

At least 20 new gTLD applications that have not self-designated their strings as “geographic” risk being categorized and evaluated as such anyway, according to DI PRO’s analysis.

Four of these applications will likely fail evaluation completely — or will preemptively be withdrawn for a refund — and 16 more stand at risk being asked to provide letters of non-objection from governments around the world.

The affected strings include dot-brands and generic terms that do not, to an English speaker, appear geographic at first glance. They do, however, appear on the lists of geographic strings protected by the Applicant Guidebook.

The following analysis looks only at the 20 applications that are not currently designated geographic (not the 49 applications that are) but which in our determination are likely to fail the Geographic Names Review.

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Five thousand strings that could get your gTLD application rejected

Kevin Murphy
January 8, 2012
Analysis, Resources

If an applied-for gTLD string is rejected by ICANN for any reason, the entire application fails. There are no opportunities to rectify the problem. This article analyzes a wide variety of scenarios in which strings can be rejected and provides a downloadable spreadsheet of over 5,000 specific banned strings — including brands, abbreviations and generic terms — that could cause an application to fall at the first hurdle.

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