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.shop among four gTLDs heading to auction

Kevin Murphy, October 30, 2015, Domain Registries

The new gTLDs .shop, .shopping, .cam and .phone are all set to go to auction after their various delays and objections were cleared up.

It seems that .shop and .shopping contention sets remain merged, so only one string from one applicant will emerge victorious.

That’s due to a completely mad String Confusion Objection decision that ruled the two words are too confusingly similar to coexist in the DNS.

That SCO ruling was made by the same guy who held up both sets of applications when he ruled that .shop and .通販 (“.onlineshopping”) were also too confusingly similar.

The two rulings combined linked the contention sets for all three strings.

.通販 applicant Amazon appealed its SCO loss using a special process that ICANN created especially for the occasion, and won.

But .shop and .shopping applicants were not given the same right to appeal, meaning the auction will take place between nine .shop applicants and .shopping applicants Uniregistry and Donuts.

Donuts is an applicant for .shop and .shopping, meaning it will have to make its mind up which string it prefers, if it intends to win the auction.

If it’s a private auction, Donuts would presumably qualify for a share of its own winning bid. Weird.

(UPDATE: That was incorrect).

The other contention set held up by an inconsistent SCO decision was .cam, which was originally ruled too similar to .com.

Rightside won its appeal too, meaning it will be fought at auction between Famous Four, Rightside and AC Webconnecting.

.phone had been held up for different reasons.

It’s a two-way fight between Donuts and Dish DBS, a TV company that wanted to run .phone as a closed generic. Like almost all closed generic applicants, Dish has since changed its plans.

Viking victor in .cruise gTLD auction

Kevin Murphy, October 2, 2015, Domain Registries

Viking River Cruises has emerged as the winner of the .cruise new gTLD contention set.

It seems to have beaten Cruise Lines International Association, which has withdrawn the only competing application, in an auction.

Both applicants originally proposed a single-registrant model, in which only the registry could own domains, but changed their plans after ICANN adopted Governmental Advisory Committee advice against so-called “closed generic” gTLDs.

There was controversy in July when CLIA claimed Viking had waited too long to change its proposed registration policies.

The group accused Viking of deliberately delaying the contention set.

ICANN, however, rejected its argument, saying applicants can submit change requests at any time.

Viking’s updated application seems to envisage something along the lines of .travel, where registration is limited to credentialed industry members, defined as:

Applicant and its Affiliates, agents, network providers and others involved in the delivery of cruise-related services, including without limitation: companies that hold a license from a governmental or regulatory body to offer cruise services, companies that provide services or equipment to cruise providers, as well as consultants, resellers, engineers, etc., working with the cruise industry.

Viking is already the registry for its dot-brand, .viking.

Live gTLD .reise sold at auction

Kevin Murphy, March 3, 2015, Domain Sales

The first auction of a live new gTLD resulted in a sale, I can reveal.

Dotreise’s .reise, which is German for “.travel”, changed hands in an auction managed by Applicant Auction last Friday.

Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to identify the winning bidder or the winning bid, but the winner’s identity will inevitably be revealed sooner or later.

Applicant Auction had said there was to be a $400,000 starting bid on the gTLD.

.reise has been general availability since August but has only about 1,300 names in its zone file. It retails for up to $180 a year.

If the TLD’s new owner is not Donuts, the company will find itself competing with Donuts’ much cheaper and more popular .reisen.

Tucows and Namecheap exit $14m .online deal

Tucows and Namecheap have both pulled out of their joint venture with Radix to run the .online registry.

Tucows revealed the move, which will see Radix run .online solo, in a press release yesterday.

Both Tucows and Namecheap are registrars, whereas Radix is pretty much focused on being a registry nowadays.

While financial terms have not been disclosed, Tucows CEO Elliot Noss had previously said that each of the three companies had funded the new venture to the tune of $4 million to $5 million.

I estimate that this puts the total investment in the deal — which includes the price of winning .online at auction — at $13 million to $14 million.

Noss has also hinted that the gTLD sold for much more than the $6.8 million paid for .tech.

.online has not yet been delegated.

Google buys .app for over $25 million

Kevin Murphy, February 26, 2015, Domain Registries

The fiercely competed new gTLD .app has sold to Google for a record-breaking $25 million.

The company’s Charleston Road Registry subsidiary beat out 12 other applicants for the string, including Donuts, Amazon, Famous Four Media, Radix and Afilias.

The auction lasted two days and fetched a winning bid of $25,001,000, more than any other new gTLD to date.

The previous high is believed to be .blog, which I estimate sold for less than $20 million.

Because it was an ICANN-run “last resort” auction, all of the money goes into ICANN’s special auction proceeds fund, which previously stood at just shy of $35 million.

Previous ICANN auctions have fetched prices between $600,000 and $6,760,000.

Google originally proposed .app as a closed registry in which only Google and its partners could register names.

However, after the Governmental Advisory Committee pressured ICANN to disallow “closed generics”, Google changed its application to enable anyone to register.