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CentralNic and .CLUB reveal premium sales

Kevin Murphy, November 8, 2017, Domain Services

CentralNic and .CLUB Domains have both revealed sales of premium domain names over the last several days.

CentralNic said yesterday that it has sold “a number” of premiums for $3.4 million.

The names are believed to be from its own portfolio, rather than registry-reserved names in any of the TLDs it manages. The company did not disclose which names, in which TLDs, it had sold.

The sale smooths out potential lumpiness in CentralNic’s revenue, and the company noted that the sales means that recurring revenue from its registrar and registry business will become an increasing proportion of its revenue as its premium portfolio diminishes.

Last week, .CLUB announced that it sold $380,793 of premium .club domains in the third quarter. That was spread over 452 domains.

The big-ticket domains were porn.club and basketball.club, sold by the registry for $85,000 together.

The Q3 headline number was a sharp decline from the Q2 spike of $2.7 million, which was boosted by auctions in China.

The company published a lot more data on its sales on its blog, here.

This is who won the .inc, .llc and .llp gTLD auctions

Kevin Murphy, October 19, 2017, Domain Registries

The winners of the auctions to run the gTLD registries for company identifiers .inc, .llc and .llp have emerged due to ICANN application withdrawals.

All three contested gTLDs had been held up for years by appeals to ICANN by Dot Registry — an applicant with the support of US states attorneys general — but went to private auction in September after the company gave up its protests for reasons its CEO doesn’t so far want to talk about.

The only auction won by Dot Registry was .llp. That stands for Limited Liability Partnership, a legal construct most often used by law firms in the US and probably the least frequently used company identifier of the three.

Google was the applicant with the most cash in all three auctions, but it declined to win any of them.

.inc seems to have been won by a Hong Kong company called GTLD Limited, run by DotAsia CEO Edmon Chong. DotAsia runs .asia, the gTLD granted by ICANN in the 2003 application round.

My understanding is that the winning bid for .inc was over $15 million.

If that’s correct, my guess is that the quickest, easiest way to make that kind of money back would be to build a business model around defensive registrations at high prices, along the lines of .sucks or .feedback.

My feedback would be that that business model would suck, so I hope I’m wrong.

There were 11 original applicants for .inc, but two companies withdrew their applications years ago.

Dot Registry, Uniregisty, Afilias, GMO, MMX, Nu Dot Co, Google and Donuts stuck around for the auction but have all now withdrawn their applications, meaning they all likely shared in the lovely big prize fund.

MMX gained $2.4 million by losing the .inc and .llc auctions, according to a recent disclosure.

.llc, a US company nomenclature with more potential customers of lower net worth, went to Afilias.

Dot Registry, MMX, Donuts, LLC Registry, Top Level Design, myLLC and Google were also in the .llc auction and have since withdrawn their applications.

Millions spent as three more new gTLDs auctioned

Kevin Murphy, September 26, 2017, Domain Registries

Two or three new gTLDs have been sold in a private auction that may well have seen over $20 million spent.

The not-yet-delegated strings .inc, .llc and (I think) .llp hit the block at some point this month.

They are the first new gTLDs to be auctioned since Verisign paid $135 million for .web a little over a year ago.

At this point, nobody wants to talk about which applicant(s) won which of the newly sold strings, but it seems that the proceeds ran into many millions.

MMX, which applied for .inc and .llc, said this morning that it has benefited from a $2.4 million windfall by losing both auctions.

The auctions evidently took place in September, but CEO Toby Hall declined to comment any further, citing non-disclosure agreements.

There were nine remaining applicants for .inc and eight for .llc.

I don’t think it’s possible to work out which sold for how much using just MMX’s disclosure.

But private auctions typically see the winning bid divided equally between the losers.

I believe .llp was probably sold off by auction at the same time.

The reason for this is that .llc, .inc and .llp were contention sets all being held up by one applicant’s dispute with ICANN.

Dot Registry LLC had applied for all three as “community” gTLDs, which meant it had to go through the Community Evaluation Process.

While it failed the CPE on all three counts, the company subsequently filed an Independent Review Process complaint against ICANN, which it won last August.

You may recall that this was the IRP that found disturbing levels of ICANN meddling in the drafting of the CPE panel’s findings.

Ever since then, ICANN has been conducting an internal review, assisted by outside experts, into how the CPE process worked (or didn’t).

Lawyers for Dot Registry and other affected applications (for .music and .gay) have been haranguing ICANN all year to get a move on and resolve the issue.

And yet, just as the end appeared to be in sight, Dot Registry seems to have decided to give up (or, possibly, cash out) and allow the strings to go to auction.

CEO Shaul Jolles declined to comment on the auctions today.

All I can currently tell you is that at least two of the Dot Registry holdout strings have been sold and that MMX did not win either of them.

The applicants for .inc were: Uniregistry, Dot Registry, Afilias, GMO, GTLD Limited, MMX, Nu Dot Co (now a known Verisign front), Donuts and Google.

The applicants for .llc were: MMX, Dot Registry, Nu Dot Co, Donuts, Afilias, Top Level Design, myLLC and Google.

DropCatch spends millions to buy FIVE HUNDRED more registrars

Kevin Murphy, December 2, 2016, Domain Registrars

Domain drop-catching service DropCatch.com has added five hundred new registrar accreditations to its stable over the last few days.

The additions give the company a total accreditation count of at least 1,252, according to DI data.

That means about 43% of all ICANN-accredited registrars are now controlled by just one company.

DropCatch is owned by TurnCommerce, which is also parent of registrar NameBright and premium sales site HugeDomains.

Because gTLD registries rate-limit attempts to register names, drop-catchers such as DropCatch find a good way to increase their chances of registering expiring names is to own as many registrars as possible.

DropCatch is in an arms race here with Web.com, owner of SnapNames and half-owner of NameJet, which has about 500 registrars.

The new accreditations would have cost DropCatch $1.75 million in ICANN application fees alone. They will add $2 million a year to its running costs in terms of extra fixed fees.

That’s not counting the cost of creating 500 brand new LLC companies — named in the new batch DropCatch.com [number] LLC where the number ranges from 1046 to 1545 — each of which is there purely for the purpose of owning the accreditation.

In total, the company is now paying ICANN fixed annual fees in excess of $5 million, not counting its variable fees and per-transaction fees.

Because the ICANN variable fee is split evenly between all registrars (with some exceptions I don’t think apply to DropCatch), I believe the addition of 500 new registrars means all the other registrars will be paying less in variable fees.

There’s clearly money to be made in expiring names.

ICANN has $400m in the bank

Kevin Murphy, October 27, 2016, Domain Policy

ICANN ended its fiscal 2016 with just shy of $400 million on its balance sheet, according to its just-released financial report.

As of June 30, the organization had assets of $399.6 million, up from $376.5 million a year earlier, the statement (pdf) says.

Its revenue for the year was actually down, at $194.6 million in 2016 compared to $216.8 million in 2015.

That dip was almost entirely due to less money coming in via “last-resort” new gTLD auctions.

The growth of the gTLD business led to $74.5 million coming from registries, up from $59 million in 2015.

Registrar revenue grew from $39.3 million to $48.3 million.

Money from ccTLD registries, whose contributions are entirely voluntary, was down to $1.1 million from $2.1 million.

Expenses were up across the board, from $143 million to $131 million, largely due to $5 million increases in personnel and professional services costs.

The results do not take into account the $135 million Verisign paid for .web, which happened after the end of the fiscal year.

Auction proceeds are earmarked for some yet-unspecified community purpose and sit outside its general working capital pool. Regardless, they’re factored into these audited financial reports.

ICANN has to date taken in almost a quarter of a billion dollars from auctions. Its board recently decided to diversify how the money is invested, so the pot could well grow.