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Identify.com terminated

Kevin Murphy, March 24, 2015, Domain Registrars

ICANN has terminated the accreditation of defunct registrar Identify.com.

The company received its final compliance notice (pdf) last week and will lose its contractual ability to sell gTLD domains April 17.

Not that many will notice or care.

According to the notice, ICANN has been informed that the company is no longer in business.

Identify.com does not currently resolve to a web page, at least for me. According to registry reports, it had just six domain names under management in November.

Back in 2011, its DUM was measured in the low hundreds. Most transferred out or deleted in the meantime.

According to the notice, the registrar failed to provide information about its dealings with the owner of a specific domain name, patschool.com.

According to DomainTools, that domain has never been registered with Identify.com.

It’s ICANN’s third registrar termination in 2015.

.tk registrar gets ICANN breach notice

Kevin Murphy, March 19, 2015, Domain Registrars

OpenTLD, the registrar owned by .tk registry Freenon, has received an odd contract-breach notice from ICANN.

The company apparently forgot to send ICANN a Compliance Certificate for 2014, despite repeated pestering by ICANN staff.

It’s the first time I’ve seen ICANN issue a breach notice (pdf) for this reason.

A Compliance Certificate, judging by the 2013 Registrar Accreditation Agreement, seems to be a simple form letter that the CEO must fill in, sign and submit once a year.

Coming back into compliance would be, one imagines, five minutes’ work.

As well as being an ICANN-accredited registrar, OpenTLD is part of Freenom. That’s the registry that repurposes under-used ccTLDs with a “freemium” model that allows free registrations.

Its flagship, .tk, is the biggest ccTLD in world, with over 30 million active names.

Two legit registrars held to account for lack of abuse tracking

Kevin Murphy, January 26, 2015, Domain Registrars

ICANN Compliance’s campaign against registrars that fail to respond to abuse reports continued last week, with two registrars hit with breach notices.

The registrars in question are Above.com and Astutium, neither of which one would instinctively bundle in to the “rogue registrar” category.

Both companies have been told they’ve breached section 3.18.1 of their Registrar Accreditation Agreement, which says: “Registrar shall take reasonable and prompt steps to investigate and respond appropriately to any reports of abuse.”

Specifics were not given, but it seems that people filed abuse reports with the registrars then complained to ICANN when they did not get the response they wanted. ICANN then was unable to get the registrars to show evidence that they had responded.

Both companies have until February 12 to come back into compliance or risk losing their accreditations.

Domain investor-focused Above.com had over 150,000 gTLD domains on its books at the last official count. UK-based Astutium has fewer than 5,000 (though it says the current number, presumably including ccTLD names, is 53,350).

It’s becoming increasingly clear that registrars under the 2013 RAA are going to be held to account by ICANN to the somewhat vague requirements of 3.18.1, and that logging communications with abuse reports is now a must.

ICANN audit claims two more registrar scalps

Kevin Murphy, January 20, 2015, Domain Registrars

Two tiny registrars — WebZero and Black Ice Domains — have had their registrar accreditations terminated for a failure to respond to a routine ICANN audit.

Israel-based Black Ice had just a couple thousands gTLD domains under management; US-based WebZero had fewer than 100.

Both registrars stood accused of not providing documents to ICANN in response to an audit, per their Registrar Accreditation Agreements.

ICANN will now look for a registrar or registrars to take over these registrars’ domains.

A quarter of registrar’s names are “illicit pharmacies”

Kevin Murphy, January 16, 2015, Domain Services

One in four of the domain names registered with the registrar NetLynx are linked to current, past or potential future rogue drug sites, according to online pharmacy monitor LegitScript.

The Mumbai-based registrar was hit with a breach notice by ICANN Compliance last week, over an alleged failure to investigate an abuse complaint about a single customer domain, tnawsol24h.com.

NetLynx did not adequately respond to ICANN’s calls from November 26 to January 5, according to the notice (pdf).

While ICANN did not identify the source or nature of the complaint, according to LegitScript it was filed by the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency and it claimed that the domain was being used as a “rogue internet pharmacy”.

LegitScript did some research into NetLynx’s domains under management and now claims that it is not an isolated case.

Company president John Horton blogged:

at least a quarter of the registrar’s business is dependent on rogue Internet pharmacy registrations, with roughly 3,000 of the 12,000 domain names under the registrar’s portfolio taggable as current, past or “holding sites” for illicit online pharmacies.

Horton clarified for DI that the 3,000 number is extrapolated from the fact that LegitScript managed to categorize 1,820 out of the 7,000 NetLynx domains it could find as problematic.

Of those, 820 were “online and active” rogue pharmacies, he said. He gave canadian-drug-pharmacy.com, pills-delivery.net and pillsforlife.net as examples.

Another 780 were hosting rogue pharmacies in the past but have since been shut down, he said.

Finally, LegitScript categorized 220 as “meeting known patterns” for “holding sites” where illicit pharmacies may be launched in future. Horton said:

many of the spam pharma organizations use “holding domain names” (not all are online at any one time), so if the website was NOT currently online, we looked to a variety of data — known domain name patterns, screenshots, known rogue name servers, known rogue IP addresses, etc. — to determine the likelihood that a domain name is likely to be a rogue Internet pharmacy, and gave NetLynx the benefit of the doubt if there was any lack of certainty

LegitScript classifies online pharmacies as “rogue” if they offer to ship medicines without a prescription to people in jurisdictions where prescriptions are required.

Horton is now calling for ICANN to look into terminating NetLynx’s accreditation.