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Is The Hunger Games’ new .movie domain illegal?

Donuts may have launched its best new gTLD anchor tenant in violation of ICANN rules.

The company revealed earlier this week that The Hunger Games movies are using thehungergames.movie to promote the fourth and final installment of the wildly successful “trilogy”.

The domain name even features in the trailer for the film, which currently has over 1.7 million YouTube views.

But it has been claimed that Donuts activated the domain in the DNS two weeks before it was allowed to under its ICANN registry contract.

It boils down to “controlled interruption”, the controversial mechanism by which registries mitigate the risk of potentially harmful name collisions in the DNS.

Under ICANN’s rules for CI, for 90 days registries have to implement a wildcard in their zone file that redirects all domains other than nic.[tld] to 127.0.53.53 and your-dns-needs-immediate-attention.[tld].

“The Registry Operator must not activate any other names under the TLD until after the 90-day controlled interruption period has been completed,” the rules say, in bold text.

Donuts’ .movie was delegated on or around March 26, which means when thehungergames.movie was activated there were still about two weeks left on the .movie CI clock.

As far as I can tell from reading ICANN documentation on CI, there are no carve-outs for anchor tenants.

The .movie zone file has five other domains related to The Hunger Games in it — the only names other than nic.movie — but they don’t seem to resolve.

There’s no actual security or stability risk here, of course.

If .movie had used the old method of blocking a predefined list of identified name collisions, thehungergames.movie would not have even been affected — it’s not on .movie’s list of collisions.

However, if ICANN decides rules have been broken and Donuts is forced to deactivate the domain, it would be a painfully embarrassing moment for the new gTLD industry.

It can perhaps be hoped that ICANN’s process of investigating such things takes about two weeks to carry out.

I’ve contacted Donuts for comment and will provide an update if and when I receive any additional information.

NameVault terminated by ICANN

NameVault, a registrar that once had over 75,000 domains under management, has been terminated by ICANN over multiple alleged contract breaches.

ICANN told (pdf) the Canadian company this week that its right to sell gTLD domain names will come to an end June 17.

The breaches primarily relate to its failure to provide records relating to the domain stronglikebull.com and its failure to provide ICANN with a working phone number.

NameVault belonged to domain investor Adam Matuzich, but I hear he may have sold it off to an Indian outfit several months ago (that may have been a surprise to ICANN too).

Back in 2011, it had over 75,000 names on its books. Today, it has fewer than 1,000.

The decline seems to be largely due to the departure of fellow domain investor Mike Berkens, who started taking his portfolio to Hexonet a few years ago.

ICANN will now ask other registrars if they want to take over NameVault’s domains.

It’s the fourth registrar to lose its accreditation this year.

Three registrars suspended by ICANN

ICANN has enforced the 2013 Registrar Accreditation Agreement against three more registrars, suspending their ability to sell gTLD domain names.

Canadian registrar Namevault, along with Signdomains and Times Internet of India, cannot sell domains or accept inbound transfers from April 21 to July 20, according to ICANN compliance notices.

Namevault’s suspension came after it got its third compliance strike in a year, this time relating to its failure to provide records about domain stronglikebull.com, which was at Namevault from 2008 but is now at Go Daddy.

Times Internet has failed to implement a Whois service, despite being first warned about its failings last September, ICANN says.

Signdomains was originally issued a breach notice due to its failure to pay over $3,000 in accreditation fees. It also does not display pricing information on its web site, according to ICANN. Neither breach has been rectified.

The three registrars have not many more than 10,000 names under management between them, according to latest registry reports.

They’re the first three registrars to have their RAAs suspended in 2015. Three other registrars have been terminated since the beginning of the year.

Identify.com terminated

Kevin Murphy, March 24, 2015, Domain Registrars

ICANN has terminated the accreditation of defunct registrar Identify.com.

The company received its final compliance notice (pdf) last week and will lose its contractual ability to sell gTLD domains April 17.

Not that many will notice or care.

According to the notice, ICANN has been informed that the company is no longer in business.

Identify.com does not currently resolve to a web page, at least for me. According to registry reports, it had just six domain names under management in November.

Back in 2011, its DUM was measured in the low hundreds. Most transferred out or deleted in the meantime.

According to the notice, the registrar failed to provide information about its dealings with the owner of a specific domain name, patschool.com.

According to DomainTools, that domain has never been registered with Identify.com.

It’s ICANN’s third registrar termination in 2015.

.tk registrar gets ICANN breach notice

Kevin Murphy, March 19, 2015, Domain Registrars

OpenTLD, the registrar owned by .tk registry Freenon, has received an odd contract-breach notice from ICANN.

The company apparently forgot to send ICANN a Compliance Certificate for 2014, despite repeated pestering by ICANN staff.

It’s the first time I’ve seen ICANN issue a breach notice (pdf) for this reason.

A Compliance Certificate, judging by the 2013 Registrar Accreditation Agreement, seems to be a simple form letter that the CEO must fill in, sign and submit once a year.

Coming back into compliance would be, one imagines, five minutes’ work.

As well as being an ICANN-accredited registrar, OpenTLD is part of Freenom. That’s the registry that repurposes under-used ccTLDs with a “freemium” model that allows free registrations.

Its flagship, .tk, is the biggest ccTLD in world, with over 30 million active names.