New gTLDs pass 200,000 registrations

The number of domain names in new gTLDs passed 200,000 last night, according to zone files.

The exact number, according to the DI PRO database, is 201,184.

It’s based on incremental organic growth over the last week since the last batch of new gTLDs went into general availability, rather than any big launch events or surges.

Here are the top 10 zones, all of which belong to Donuts.

guru41,161
photography25,308
today12,157
tips11,444
technology9,066
clothing8,270
bike8,232
directory8,194
land7,569
gallery7,383

What the 200,000 count does not reflect is the first day of general availability for Google’s first-to-launch gTLD, .みんな (Japanese for “everyone”), which I’m expecting to start showing numbers tomorrow.

In related news, the DI PRO new gTLD zone file league table service (here) was upgraded today to make it a bit more useful during periods of patchy data availability.

The service will now show all delegated new gTLDs that have started publishing zone files, along with the most-recent domain counts, on days when the file was for whatever reason not available.

Track new gTLD growth on DI PRO

Kevin Murphy, February 6, 2014, Domain Services

DI PRO subscribers from today can track daily changes in new gTLD registration volumes.

The New gTLD Zone File Report is a simple, sortable table showing how each new gTLD has performed over the last 24 hours.

It’s the database I’ve been using for DI’s analysis of Donuts’ landrush numbers over the last week, but I’ve received a few requests to make the data available in a more structured way.

DI PRO

The data is also being incorporated into the next TLD Health Check update too, enabling longer-term views and interactive charts. More on that in due course.

DI PRO subscribers also receive access to the New gTLD Application Tracker, a calendar of crucial new gTLD launch dates, the New gTLD Collisions Database and many more useful services.

These are the top 50 name collisions

Kevin Murphy, November 19, 2013, Domain Tech

Having spent the last 36 hours crunching ICANN’s lists of almost 10 million new gTLD name collisions, the DI PRO collisions database is back online, and we can start reporting some interesting facts.

First, while we reported yesterday that 1,318 new gTLD applicants will be asked to block a total of 9.8 million unique domain names, the number of distinct second-level strings involved is somewhat smaller.

It’s 6,806,050, according to our calculations, still a bewilderingly high number.

The most commonly blocked string, as expected, is “www”. It’s on the block-lists for 1,195 gTLDs, over 90% of the total.

Second is “2010″. I currently have no explanation for this, but I’m wondering if it’s an artifact of the years of Day In The Life data upon which ICANN based its lists.

Protocol-related strings such as “wpad” and “isatap” also rank highly, as do strings matching popular TLDs such as “com”, “org”, “uk” and “de”. Single-character strings are also very popular.

The brand with the most blocks (free trademark protection?) is unsurprisingly Google.

The string “google” appears as an exact match on 930 gTLDs’ lists. It appears as a substring of 1,235 additional blocked strings, such as “google-toolbar” and “googlemaps”.

Facebook, Yahoo, Gmail, YouTube and Hotmail also feature in the top 100 blocked brands.

DI PRO subscribers can search for strings that interest them, discovering how many and which gTLDs they’re blocked in, using the database.

Here’s a table of the top 50 blocked strings.

StringgTLD Count
www1195
20101187
com1124
wpad1048
net1032
isatap1030
org1008
mail964
google930
ww911
uk908
info905
http901
de900
us897
co881
local872
edu865
cn839
a839
e837
ru836
m833
ca831
c826
it821
tv817
server817
in814
gov814
wwww810
f804
facebook803
br803
fr799
ftp796
au796
yahoo794
1784
w780
biz778
g776
forum776
my764
cc762
jp761
s758
images754
webmail753
p749

Search all new gTLD collision block lists

Kevin Murphy, October 31, 2013, Domain Services

DI PRO subscribers can now see which strings appear most often in new gTLD registries’ block-lists and search for strings — such as trademarks or premium strings — that interest them.

We’ve just launched the New gTLD Collisions Database.

Currently, it indexes all 14,493 unique strings that ICANN has told the first 13 new gTLD registries to block — due to the risk of collisions with internal networks — when they launch.

By default the strings are ranked by how many gTLDs have been told to block them.

You’ll see immediately that “www” is currently blocked in all 13 registries, suggesting that it’s likely to be blocked in the vast majority of new gTLDs.

Users can also search for a string in order to see how many, and which, new gTLDs are going to have to block it.

We’re hoping that the service will prove useful to trademark owners that want to see which “freebie” blocked strings they stand to benefit from, and in which gTLDs.

For example, we can already see that 10 meaningful strings containing “nike” are to be blocked. For “facebook”, it’s four registries. For “google”, it’s currently three strings across six gTLDs.

The service will also hopefully be useful to registries that want to predict which strings ICANN may tell them to block. We’re seeing a lot of gambling terms showing up in non-gambling TLDs, for example.

Here’s a screenshot of sample output for the search “cars”.

DI PRO

As ICANN publishes lists for more gTLDs, the database will grow and become more useful and time-saving.

Comments, suggestions and bug reports as always to kevin@domainincite.com

New gTLD Application Tracker 3.0 launched

Kevin Murphy, August 12, 2013, Domain Services

While we’ve added several smaller requested features to the DI PRO New gTLD Application Tracker over the last few months, the time has come for the second big update to the service.

Subscribers have asked for a number of changes and upgrades to make it easier to quickly get at the data they need, and we’re happy to oblige.

The Application Tracker, has been updated in three areas.

New “Current Status” Tab

Talking to subscribers over the last few weeks, it became clear that different people are using the Application Tracker in different ways for different reasons.

Some want to be able to find out if, for example, an application has ever been objected to or received GAC advice, while others only want to know whether those objections and advice are still active.

From today, both use cases are made easier with the introduction of a new Current Status tab.

Searches conducted under this tab automatically filter out all withdrawn and rejected applications. If a contention set has been won, the winner will not display as contested in results.

Similarly, if an application managed to fight its way through objections or GAC advice, it will show as unopposed and unencumbered in search results pages.

DI PRO

Subscribers who want to carry on using the service to access historical information about applications can continue to use the previous version of the Application Tracker under the new “Original Status” tab.

Full IE Results

The existing IE Results database has been folded into the Application Tracker under a new tab, and there’s also a new option to see the full scores for each application that has passed through Initial Evaluation.

The new IE Results (Detailed) tab shows the scores each application received for each of the 27 Applicant Guidebook questions for which scores are made available

The Basic tab shows the financial and technical evaluation subtotals along with other information about the applicant and back-end provider.

New Search Options

With ICANN’s publication of Interilse Consulting’s report into the potential security risks of new gTLDs last week, each string was assigned a risk profile: Low, High or Uncalculated.

The database was updated with this information the same day it was published, but now you can search on it too, choosing to limit your search to, or omit, any of the three classes.

You can now also search for, or exclude, applications that have been rejected by ICANN. There are only three such applications right now, but I’m sure this option will become more useful in future.

Past and Future Updates

For details of all the original features of the Application Tracker, see this April blog post. For DI PRO subscription information, click here.

Subscribers can send suggestions for future updates to kevin@domainincite.com, as always.