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Amazon offered $5 million of free Kindles for .amazon gTLD

Kevin Murphy, October 23, 2018, Domain Policy

Amazon offered South American governments $5 million worth of free Kindles, content and cloud services in exchange for their endorsement of its .amazon gTLD application, it has emerged.

The proposal, made in February, also included an offer of four years of free hosting up to a value of $1 million.

The sweeteners came during negotiations with the eight governments of the Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization, which object to .amazon because they think it would infringe on their geographical and cultural rights.

Amazon has sought to reassure these governments that it will reserve culturally sensitive strings of their choice in .amazon, and that it will actively support any future applications for gTLDs such as .amazonas, which is the more meaningful geographic string in local languages.

I’ve reported on these offers before, but to my knowledge the offer of free Kindles and AWS credits has not been made public before. (UPDATE: Nope.)

According to a September letter from ACTO, published (pdf) this week, Amazon told it:

as an indication of goodwill and support for the people and governments of the Amazonian Region… [Amazon will] make available to the OTCA governments credits for the use of AWS services, Kindles preloaded with mutually agreed upon content, and similar Amazon.com services and products in an amount not to exceed $5,000,000.

Amazon also offered to set up a .amazon web site “to support the Amazonian people’s cultural heritage” and pay up to $1 million to host it for four years.

These kinds of financial sweeteners would not be without precedent.

The applicant for .bar wound up offering to donate $100,000 to fund a school in Montenegro, after the government noted the string match with the Bar region of the country.

The ACTO countries met in August to consider Amazon’s offer, but chose not to accept it.

However, they’re not closing off talks altogether. Instead, they’ve taken up ICANN on its offer to act as a facilitator of talks between Amazon and ACTO members.

The ICANN board of directors passed a resolution last month instructing CEO Goran Marby to “support the development of a solution” that would involve “sharing the use of those top-level domains with the ACTO member states”.

ACTO secretary general Jacqueline Mendoza has responded positively to this resolution (pdf) and invited Marby to ACTO headquarters in Brasilia to carry on these talks.

38th dot-brand bows out after acquisition

Kevin Murphy, August 15, 2018, Domain Registries

Telecity Group, which used to be a major London-based internet collocation facilities operator, has told ICANN it no longer wishes to run its dot-brand gTLD.

.telecity will become the 38th dot-brand gTLD to terminate its registry agreement.

The company, which had close to £350 million ($445 million) revenue in 2014, was acquired by US-based rival Equinix for £2.35 billion ($3 billion) in early 2016.

Equinix has since started to transition away from the Telecity brand. Its old .com home page now instructs visitors to visit the Equinix site instead.

Like most of the other dead dot-brands, .telecity was never used.

Allstate dumps a dot-brand

Kevin Murphy, August 9, 2018, Domain Registries

American insurance giant Allstate has dumped one of its two dot-brand gTLDs.

The company, which had $38.5 billion revenue in 2017, has told ICANN it no longer wishes to run .goodhands, which is a partial match to its long-time “Are you in good hands?” advertising slogan.

Allstate still owns the contract to run .allstate, where it has a handful of domains that redirect to its primary .com site.

The company had also applied for the gTLDs .carinsurance and .autoinsurance, but withdrew both applications after the “closed generics” controversy in 2013.

.goodhands is the ninth dot-brand to self-terminate this year and the 37th since .doosan became the first back in September 2015.

Hundreds of other dot-brand gTLDs are still live, many of them in active use.

Baidu gets Chinese approval for .baidu

It seems China’s Draconian licensing program for TLD registries is not limited to foreigners.

Chinese internet giant Baidu on Friday became the latest new gTLD registry operator to get the nod to run a TLD by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology.

The approval was for .baidu, which is currently pre-launch with no launch plan on record.

Despite the brand match, it’s not technically a dot-brand gTLD — its ICANN contract has no Specification 13, which contains various carve-outs for single-registrant spaces.

While not particularly well-known in the English-speaking world, Baidu is second only to Google in terms of search engine market share, due to its dominance in China.

The company had 2017 revenue of almost CNY 85 billion ($12.5 billion).

Four more dot-brands call it quits

Four more dot-brand gTLDs are to disappear after their operators decided they don’t want them any more.

These are the latest victims of the voluntary cull:

  • High-priced bling-maker Richemont, an enthusiastic new gTLD early adopter, is dumping .panerai (a watch brand) and .jlc (for Jaeger-LeCoultre, another watch brand), the sixth and seventh of its fourteen originally applied-for gTLDs to be abandoned.
  • Norwegian energy company Equinor, which changed its name from Statoil a few months ago, is getting rid of .statoil for obvious reasons. Will it bother to apply for .equinor next time around? We’ll have to wait (and wait) and see.
  • Online printing outfit Vistaprint no longer wants .vista, one of its two delegated TLDs. It still has .vistaprint, and is in contracting with ICANN for its bitterly-won .webs, which matches its Webs.com brand.

The three companies informed ICANN of their intention to scrap their registry agreements between May 14 and June 14, but ICANN only published their requests on its web site in the last few hours.

Needless to say, none of the four TLDs had any live sites beyond their contractually mandated minimum.

The number of delegated new gTLD registries to voluntarily terminate their contracts now stands at 36, all dot-brands.

Under ICANN procedures, the termination requests and ICANN’s decision not to re-delegate the strings to other registries are now open for public comment.