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Endurance domain revenue dips

Kevin Murphy, February 7, 2019, Domain Registrars

Endurance International put in a poor show when it came to domains name sales in 2018.

Revenue and average revenue per registrant were both down in the fourth quarter and full-year results, which were announced this morning.

Endurance’s registrar business includes BigRock, Domain.com, FastDomain, PublicDomainRegistry.com and others.

Combined, those four brands account for almost 10 million gTLD domains under management, but that number has also been heading south recently.

The company said today that its fourth-quarter domain revenue was $31.3 million, down from $33 million a year earlier. It had 666,000 domain subscribers at the end of the quarter, down from 683,000.

Average revenue per subscriber for the quarter was also down, from $16.63 to $15.63.

For the full year, revenue was down from $133.6 million to $129.9 million and average revenue per subscriber was down from $16.98 to $16.05.

The shrinkage is reflected in the latest transaction reports filed with ICANN, too.

In October, the most recently reported month, all four of Endurance’s biggest registrar brands shrunk in terms of DUM.

PDR was the biggest loser — actually topping the list of shrinking registrars — shedding over 76,000 gTLD domains, over 10,000 of which was from net transfers.

CentralNic expects flat profit as revenue almost doubles

Kevin Murphy, February 4, 2019, Domain Registries

London-listed domain firm CentralNic today gave investors a sneak preview of its 2018 financial performance.

The company expects its profits at the adjusted EBITDA level to be up only slightly — from £6.6 million ($8.62 million) to £6.7 million ($8.75) — compared to 2017.

But revenue is expected to soar from £24.3 million ($31.7 million) to £42.5 million ($55.5 million), largely due to the impact of its merger with KeyDrive, which completed in August.

KeyDrive was the holding company for brands including the registrars Key-Systems, Moniker and BrandShelter, and the registry providers OpenRegistry and KSRegistry.

The Luxembourgish firm reversed into AIM-listed CentralNic in a deal, described as “transformative” for CentralNic, valued at up to $55 million.

Most of the company’s revenue now comes from the registrar part of the business, though the registry division is the more profitable.

CentralNic said today that “subscription products” are now roughly 90% of total revenue.

The company expects to save £1 million ($1.3 million) this year by migrating its old registrars over to the KeyDrive platform and migrating its new registries onto the CentralNic platform.

It has also appointed KeyDrive’s former CFO as CentralNic CFO, replacing Don Baladasan. Michael Riedl has also joined the board of directors, while Baladasan remains on the board as group managing director.

Full, audited financial results will be announced in May.

MMX sees better profits than expected

Kevin Murphy, January 29, 2019, Domain Registries

Portfolio registry MMX saw 2018 financial results slightly ahead of expectations, the company told investors yesterday.

It now expects revenue to be over $15.5 million for the year, compared to $14.3 million in 2017. Operating EBITDA, its preferred profitability indicator, will be “marginally ahead of market expectations”.

It expects revenue from renewals — which MMX has been trumpeting as a key indicator of stability — to be $9.4 million, compared to $4.8 million in the prior year.

That’s mainly due to the $3.4 million contribution of recently acquired porn TLD specialist ICM Registry. Without ICM, renewal revenue was still up 20% though.

The company’s exposure to the Chinese market has also been reduced. It now contributes 36% of sales, compared to 50% in 2017.

Volatile one-off premium domain sales are also on the decrease in terms of revenue share — 15% in 2018 compared to 38% in 2017.

Its full audited results will be published later in the quarter.

Dark horse NameSilo doubles size in 2018

Kevin Murphy, January 7, 2019, Domain Registrars

Domain name registrar NameSilo says it managed to double its size in terms of cash bookings and domains under management in 2018.

The Vancouver-based company said that in 2018 it added 1.27 net new domains, an increase of 106%.

Bookings were $20.1 million, up from the $11.1 million it reported in 2017, according to the company.

NameSilo now says it has 2.49 million domains under management.

That would be a whopping 500,000 increase on the end of September, judging by the latest gTLD registry transaction reports.

The registrar is now the 17th-largest gTLD registrar by DUM, bigger than old hands such as Register.com and Name.com.

And yet I think it’s fair to say the company is a bit of a dark horse. It’s certainly managed to stay under my radar until now.

You’d be hard pressed from its web site to figure out who runs the company or where to find them, despite what ICANN registrar contracts require.

But press releases show it went public, kinda, when it backed into Canadian investment vehicle Brisio Innovations Inc last year, in a deal worth $9.5 million.

It’s now listed on the Canadian Securities Exchange, an alternative investment market, with the rather catchy ticker “URL”.

Given the rapid DUM growth, one might suspect an over-reliance on bargain-bucket new gTLDs, but that does not appear to be the case. About three quarters of its names in September were in .com.

The company credits word of mouth for its recent growth successes, and there may be some truth in that.

NameSilo performed well each month last year in terms of net transfers, often in the five-figure range. It ranked fifth in those terms in September across all gTLDs, beating the likes of Google, NameCheap and AliBaba, with almost 15% of its 90,000 net new DUM coming from transfers.

Given the much larger number of attempted adds and grace period deletes NameSilo experiences every month compared to its similarly sized peers, I rather suspect a lot of its new business is coming in via drop-catching.

The company offers customers API-only access to its platform for drop-catching deleting domains, among other purposes.

Wagner takes dig at Verisign as GoDaddy reports $310 million domain revenue

Kevin Murphy, November 7, 2018, Domain Registrars

GoDaddy CEO Scott Wagner ducked a question about how the company will react to future .com price increases during its third-quarter earnings call yesterday, but used the opportunity to take a gentle swipe at Verisign.

Asked by an analyst whether the first 7% price increase, almost certainly coming in 2020, would have any effect on GoDaddy’s gross margins (ie, will they shrink as the company swallows increased costs, or swell as it increases its own prices above 7%), Wagner said:

the last time VeriSign took a price increase the industry passed that through to the end registrant.

.com and more importantly the software around bringing somebody’s .com to life is valuable and, modestly, we’re providing the value in that relationship around taking a domain name and actually turning it into something that somebody cares about.

I’m interpreting that as a pop at the idea that Verisign enjoys the fat registration margins while GoDaddy is the one that actually has to market domains, up-sell, innovate, deal with customers, and so on.

The remarks came just a few days after Verisign, in a blog post, branded GoDaddy and other secondary-market players “scalpers”, infuriating domainers.

Wagner was talking to analysts as the market-leading registrar reported revenue for Q3 of $679.5 million, up 16.7% year over year.

Revenue from domains, still the biggest of its three reporting business segments, was $309.5 million, up 14.0% compared to the year-ago quarter. GoDaddy now has 18 million customers and over 77 million domains under management.

Overall net income was down to $13.2 million from $22.4 million, as operating expenses rose over 16% to hit $642 million, after the company invested more in marketing, development and so on. Its operating income was $37.5 million.

Contrast this with Verisign’s performance for the same quarter, reported two weeks ago.

It saw revenue about the same as GoDaddy’s domains revenue — $306 million — but net income of $138 million and operating income of $195 million.

GoDaddy and Verisign could find themselves competing before long. As part of its deal with the US government to allow it to raise .com wholesale prices once more, the government also lifted its objection to Verisign becoming a registrar, just as long as it does not deal in .com names.