Latest news of the domain name industry

Recent Posts

UK tells .eu registrants to lawyer up as no-deal Brexit looms

Kevin Murphy, January 3, 2019, Domain Policy

British .eu registrants have been urged to consider another top-level domain or seek legal advice due to the risk of losing their names if a no-deal Brexit happens.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport issued guidance shortly before Christmas, encouraging UK individuals and businesses to talk to their registrars about their .eu eligibility after March 29, currently the date we’re scheduled to leave the EU.

“[Y]ou may wish to discuss transferring your registration to another top level domain,” the guidance states. “Examples of other top level domains include .com, .co.uk, .net or .org.”

I’m sure Nominet will be delighted to see the UK government apparently prefers .com to .uk.

The guidance points to the European Commission’s own notice of March 2018, which informs Brits that they won’t be eligible to register or renew .eu domains after Brexit, and that the registry will be able to turn off those names at will.

That’s assuming a no-deal Brexit, it seems. The new UK guidance suggests that a Brexit with a transition plan is likely to give registrants a bit more breathing space, and possible future rights to retain their names.

Even though .eu is not a TLD you’ll typically see on a billboard or TV commercial in the UK — I’m fairly confident I’ve never seen one in the wild here — it seems that Brits are responsible for a big chunk of the namespace.

There were 273,000 .eu domains registered in the UK at the end of the third quarter 2018, according to EURid (pdf), down 10% on the same period 2017, a decline squarely attributed to Brexit.

There were 3.75 million .eu domains in total, with the UK being the fourth-largest source of registrations.

If you haven’t been following the Brexit saga recently, lucky you! I’ll quickly explain what’s going on.

The British parliament is currently on the verge of deciding whether to leave the EU with a negotiated deal that nobody likes — the equivalent of sawing off a perfectly healthy testicle with a rusty blade for no reason — or to leave the EU with no deal — the equivalent of sawing off both perfectly healthy testicles with a rusty blade for no reason.

The option of keeping both testicles intact and attached is unlikely to be put to the British people because two years ago we were all assured that amateur backstreet castration was fricking awesome and we’re now being warned that the almost 52% of the population who believed the horseshit, and are almost certainly too stupid to have changed their minds in the meantime, will riot in the streets rather than recast their votes.

That’s it in a nutshell.

Come April 1, don’t be surprised if DI is being brought to you from a country with fewer idiots. I’m open to suggestions. Somewhere warm, preferably.

.eu domains to be sold to non-residents

Kevin Murphy, December 10, 2018, Domain Registries

In a few years, you’ll no longer have to live in the European Union in order to buy a .eu domain name.

Residency requirements are to be dropped under new regulations approved by the European Parliament, Council and European Commission last week.

When the new rules come into effect — not expected until April 2023 — EU citizens based anywhere in the world will be able register .eu domains.

It’s not entirely clear how EURid, the current registry, will determine eligibility at point of sale, but I guess they have plenty of time to think about it.

Notably, the proposed new Regulation will shift oversight of .eu from one based on EU regulations to one based on a contract between the Commission and the registry operator.

It is hoped that this will give EURid the flexibility to more rapidly change its business model in future, merely having to agree upon a contract change rather than waiting for the EU institutions to chug through their lengthy legislative processes.

All Cyrillic .eu domains to be deleted

Eurid has announced that Cyrillic domain names in .eu will be deleted a year from now.

The registry said that it’s doing so to comply with the “no script mixing” recommendations for internationalized domain names, which are designed to limit the risk of homograph phishing attacks.

The deletions will kick in May 31, 2019, and only apply to names that have Cyrillic before the dot and Latin .eu after.

Cyrillic names in Eurid’s Cyrillic ccTLD .ею will not be affected.

The plan has been in place since Eurid adopted the IDNA2008 standard three years ago, but evidently not all registrants have dropped their affected names yet.

Bulgaria is the only EU member state to use Cyrillic in its national language.

.eu names to be sold outside the EU

Kevin Murphy, December 4, 2013, Domain Registries

EURid is to expand sales of .eu domains to three countries outside the European Union from January 8.

Companies and individuals from Iceland, Lichtenstein and Norway will get to register .eu names, due to a rule change at the registry.

The three countries are members of the European Economic Area, which enjoys many of the trade benefits of the Union but without full EU membership.

EURid said that the 2002 European Parliament regulation that created .eu always envisaged the eventual expansion of the ccTLD to the EEA.

The change expands the registry’s addressable market by fewer than 5.4 million people, five million of whom are Norwegian.

.eu registry contract up for grabs

The European Commission has opened up the .eu registry contract to competitive bidding.

The sort-of ccTLD has been managed by EurID since it launched 2004 but its contract, which has already been extended to its maximum term, is due to expire in October next year.

Would-be usurpers must be not-for-profit organizations based in the European Union, according to a Commission RFP, which should narrow the field quite a lot.

The .eu space has 3.7 million registered domain names, growing at 5.4% a year. Considering that the TLD is open to all in the EU, the numbers fare poorly compared to many European ccTLDs.

The deadline for submissions is June 20.

  • Page 1 of 2
  • 1
  • 2
  • >