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Google dumps Nazi domain in hours

Kevin Murphy, August 14, 2017, Domain Registrars

Neo-Nazi blog The Daily Stormer found itself without a registrar for the second time in a day this evening, after Google cancelled its registration.

The company told BBC News:

We are cancelling Daily Stormer’s registration with Google Domains for violating our terms of service.

The cancellation came not many hours after GoDaddy, the controversial site’s original registrar, gave its owners 24 hours to find a new registrar.

That was in response to people on Twitter complaining that the Stormer had published an article attacking a victim of alleged right-wing domestic terrorism, which GoDaddy said broke its terms of service inciting violence.

The current Whois record for dailystormer.com indicates that it is still with Google, but in a clientTransferProhibited status.

That means it should not be possible to transfer the name to a third registrar, unless and until Google changes the status.

The domain still resolves, however, from where I’m sitting.

It might be that the Stormer will now find itself registrar-hopping and/or facing a period of downtime.

GoDaddy kicks out neo-Nazi site after dead protester post

Kevin Murphy, August 14, 2017, Domain Registrars

GoDaddy has given neo-Nazi web site The Daily Stormer a day to GTFO after it posted an article viciously attacking the victim of racially motivated violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

In multiple tweets, the company said this morning that it had given the site’s owners 24 hours to move to a new registrar.

The tweets came in response to those who questioned why GoDaddy continued to host the site in light of an article posted about Heather Heyer, who was killed while protesting white nationalists at a rally on Saturday.

A man has been arrested and charged with her murder, after allegedly driving his car into a crowd, injuring 19 others.

The article in question was a horribly vicious, cartoonishly misogynistic rant, by site founder Andrew Anglin, entitled “Heather Heyer: Woman Killed in Road Rage Incident was a Fat, Childless 32-Year-Old Slut”.

GoDaddy did not specify which terms of service the Stormer had breached, but its terms do include a prohibition against promoting violence.

The Stormer web site has a disclaimer on it stating it is “opposed to violence” and that it will ban any commentators who promote violence.

Within hours of GoDaddy’s tweets, a post appeared on the site claiming to have been written by notorious hacking collective Anonynous, which claimed the site was now under its control.

The post said that the site would be taken down within 24 hours and that quantities of material on the Stormer and Anglin had been obtained.

At this time it is not clear whether the site has really been hacked or is a hoax carried out by the Stormer itself, perhaps designed to make light of upcoming downtime.

The Daily Stormer’s domain has been hosted with GoDaddy since its launch in 2013.

GoDaddy domains business grows 15% in Q2

Kevin Murphy, August 10, 2017, Domain Registrars

GoDaddy saw its revenue from domain name sales increase by almost 15% in the second quarter, the company announced this week.

Its domains revenue was $263.3 million, up 14.6% on the same quarter last year.

That was part of an overall growth trend at the company, which saw revenue for the quarter up 22.3% at $557.8 million.

Revenue growth would have been a point higher but for currency fluctuations. GoDaddy now does about a third of its business outside its native US, helped a deal by its acquisition of Host Europe Group, which closed at the start of the quarter.

Net income for the period was $18.1 million, reversing a loss of $11.1 million a year ago.

Domains account for about 47% of overall revenue at the company.

GoDaddy said it had 17 million customers at the end of the quarter, June 30, adding about a million organically compared to a year earlier and 1.6 million from the HEG acquisition.

At the end of the quarter, the company had $591.2 million in cash and equivalents and debt of $3 billion.

GoDaddy flips hosting business for $456 million

GoDaddy has sold off its recently acquired PlusServer business for €397 million ($456 million).

The buyer is a private equity firm, BC Partners.

The registrar had taken control of the business when it spent $1.79 billion on Host Europe Group earlier this year, but had said from the start that the asset was for sale.

PlusServer sells hosting to larger companies, which have more demanding support needs that small-business-focused GoDaddy is accustomed to dealing with.

The unit was bringing in annual revenue approaching $100 million per year.

GoDaddy said it planned to put the proceeds of the flip towards paying off some loans.

GoDaddy launches security service after Sucuri acquisition

GoDaddy has revealed the first fruits of its March acquisition of web security service provider Sucuri.

It’s GoDaddy Website Security, what appears to be a budget version of the services Sucuri already offers on a standalone basis.

For $6.99 per month ($83.88/year), the service monitors your web site for malware and removes it upon request. It also keeps tabs on major blacklists to make sure you’re not being blocked by Google, Norton or McAfee.

This low-end offering gets you a 12-hour response time for the cleanup component. You can up that to 30 minutes by taking out the $299.99 per year plan.

The more expensive plan also includes DDoS protection, a malware firewall and integration with a content delivery network for performance.

There’s also an intermediate, $19.99-per-month ($239.88/year) plan that includes the extra features but keeps the response time at 12 hours.

An SSL certificate is included in the two more-expensive packages.

The pricing and feature set looks to compare reasonably well with Sucuri’s standalone products, which start at $16.66 a month and offer response times as fast as four hours.

As somebody who has suffered from three major security problems on GoDaddy over the last decade or so, and found GoDaddy’s response abysmal on all three occasions (despite my generally positive views of its customer service), the new service is a somewhat tempting proposition.