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.feedback regs Fox trademark to itself during sunrise

Kevin Murphy, November 12, 2015, Domain Registries

Top Level Spectrum, the new .feedback registry, has painted a second gigantic target on itself by registering to itself a .feedback domain matching one of the world’s largest media brands.

The company has registered and put up a web site soliciting comment on Fox Broadcasting Company.

This has happened whilst .feedback is still in its sunrise period.

The intellectual property community is, I gather, not particularly happy about the move.

The domain points to a web site that uses TLS’ standard feedback platform, enabling visitors to rate and comment on Fox.

The site has a footnote: “Disclaimer: This site is provided to facilitate free speech regarding fox. No direct endorsement or association should be conferred.”

Fox had no involvement with the registration, which Whois records show is registered to Top Level Spectrum itself.

Registry CEO Jay Westerdal said that the domain is one of the 100 “promotional” domains that new gTLD registries are allowed to set aside for their own use under the terms of their ICANN contracts.

Registries usually register names like “buy.example” or “go.example”, along with the names of early adopter anchor tenant registrants, using this mechanism.

I’m not aware of any case where a registry has consciously registered a famous brand, without permission, as part of its promotional allotment.

“The website is hosted automatically by the Feedback platform,” Westerdal said. “Fox Television Network has raised no concerns and has not applied for the domain during sunrise. We are testing out promotion of the TLD with the domain as per our ICANN contract.”

Fox may still be able to buy the domain during sunrise, he said.

“This is a Registry Operation name. During sunrise, If we receive an application from a sunrise-eligible rights holders during sunrise for a Registry Operations name we may release the name for registration,” he said.

Fox’s usual registrar is MarkMonitor. Matt Serlin, VP there, said in an email that the TLS move could be raised with ICANN Compliance:

I find it curious that this branded domain name would have been registered to the registry prior to the sunrise period which is restricted to the 100 registry promotional names. The fact that the domain is actually resolving to a live site soliciting feedback for The Fox Broadcasting Company is even more troubling. MarkMonitor may look to raise this to ICANN Compliance once the registry is able to confirm how this domain was registered seemingly outside of the required process.

The IP community originally fought the introduction of the 100-domain pre-sunrise exception, saying unscrupulous registries would use it to stop trademark owners registering their brands.

While there have been some grumblings about registries reserving dictionary terms that match trademarks, this may be the first case of a registry unambiguously targeting a brand.

Top Level Spectrum courted controversy with the trademark community last week when it told DI that it plans to sell 5,000-brand match domains to a third party company after .feedback goes into general availability in January.

Westerdal told us this is not “cybersquatting”, as the sites contain disclaimers and are there to facilitate free speech.

What do you think about this use of brands as “promotional” domains?

It’s indisputably pushing the envelope of what is acceptable, but is it fair? Should registries be allowed to do this? just gave itself another reason to bid high for .web gTLD

Kevin Murphy, November 9, 2015, Domain Registrars

Registrar group is changing its stock market ticker symbol to WEB tomorrow, in another sign that it really, really wants to be identified with the string.

The switch from WWWW may indicate that the NASDAQ-listed company’s six rivals for the new gTLD .web have a fight — and a possible big payday — on their hands when .web finally goes to auction. is competing with Nu Dot Co, Radix, Google, Donuts, Afilias and Schlund for the gTLD.

The company has already fiercely defended its “right” to .web, filing successful String Confusion Objections against .webs applicant Vistaprint.

Vistaprint subsequently filed an ICANN Independent Review Process complaint to appeal its SCO loss.

Last month, the IRP was won by ICANN, but the panel left the door open for ICANN to reconsider its decision.

The .web auction is not likely to go ahead until the Vistaprint issue is resolved.

If ICANN decides the two strings can be delegated separately, what I think is the last barrier to the .web auction going ahead disappears.

If not, then Vistaprint finds itself as the seventh contender in the auction, which may give it the impetus to carry on challenging the ruling.

ICANN’s board plans to discuss the issue at its next meeting, December 10.

Which way it leans will give an indication of how long it will be before .web goes to auction.

Most US presidential hopefuls use Whois privacy despite begging for cash

Kevin Murphy, November 9, 2015, Domain Policy

More than half of the remaining US presidential candidates could have risked losing their official campaign web sites under proposed Whois privacy rules.

Today I carried out Whois queries on all 18 candidates to discover that 10, or over 55%, use a Whois privacy service.

Of the three remaining Democrat candidates, only Bernie Sanders uses privacy. Martin O’Malley and Hillary Clinton do not.

Here’s a table of the Republican candidates and their chosen privacy services. N/A means their campaigns are using what appears to be genuine contact information.

CandidateDomainPrivacy Service
Ben Carsonbencarson.comN/A
Bobby Jindalbobbyjindal.comN/A
Donald Trumpdonaldjtrump.comN/A
Jim Gilmoregilmoreforamerica.comN/A
Lindsey Grahamlindseygraham.comN/A
Rick Santorumricksantorum.comN/A

The results are interesting because rules under discussion at ICANN earlier this year — which are apparently still on the table in other international fora — would have banned the use of privacy services for commercial web sites that allow financial transactions.

All 18 candidates — even Trump — solicit donations on their campaign sites, and many sell T-shirts, bumper stickers and such.

Back in May, a minority of ICANN’s Privacy & Proxy Services Accreditation Issues Working Group (PPSAI) were in favor of banning privacy for such registrants.

The rationale was that criminals, such as those selling counterfeit drugs, should not be allowed to mask their Whois details.

Judging by a working group report at the ICANN meeting in Dublin last month, the proposed new rules have been killed off by the PPSAI after a deluge of comments — around 22,000 — that were solicited by registrars and civil rights groups.

However, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, at the exact same time as the PPSAI was revealing its change of heart, the US government was pushing for virtually identical policy at a meeting of the OECD, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

The EFF says the proposed OECD Recommendation “would require domain name registration information to be made publicly available for websites that are promoting or engaged in commercial transactions with consumers.”

It’s remarkable that the US government is apparently pushing for rules that are being violated by most of its own hopeful commanders-in-chief as part of the democratic process.

Clearly, fake pharmacies are not the only class of crook to find value in privacy.

ICANN opens blog to comments, immediately trolled

Kevin Murphy, November 9, 2015, Domain Policy

Welcome to my world, ICANN.

The organization on Friday opened its blog to commenters for the first time in years, allowing any registered user of the ICANN site to submit comments on its posts.

The switch appears to be retroactive on all previous posts on the platform.

The post announcing the move was immediately commented on by habitual, single-issue commenter Graham Schreiber, a name familiar to anyone who regularly reads the comments sections of industry blogs.

He’s the guy who unsuccessfully sued ICANN — for some reason — back in 2012 and has continued his tirade against the organization in social media ever since.

Trolling aside, it’s a good move by ICANN, something it should have done a long time ago.

While ICANN obviously accepts comments on pretty much everything it does, the usual format of emailed PDFs perhaps lacks some of the brevity, openness and immediacy of a two-way blog.

European privacy ruling could add to registrars’ costs

Kevin Murphy, November 6, 2015, Domain Registrars

European domain registrars say they are facing increased costs of doing business due to a recent court ruling on privacy protection.

As a result, US data escrow giant Iron Mountain is likely to lose a lot of its ICANN business, as EU registrars defect to local alternatives such as UK-based NCC Group.

The ruling in question deals with the so-called “safe harbor” principles, under which European companies were able to transfer customers’ private data to US companies as long as the recipient promised to abide by EU privacy protection rules.

However, former spy Edward Snowden’s revelations of widespread privacy violations by the US government seemed to show that many US tech giants were complicit in handing over such data to US spooks.

And now the European Court of Justice has ruled the safe habor principles invalid.

This affects registrars because, under their ICANN contracts, they have to escrow registrant data on a weekly basis. That’s to prevent registrants losing their domains when registrars go out of business or turn out to be crooks.

While registrars have a choice of escrow agents, pretty much all of them use Iron Mountain, because ICANN subsidizes the service down to $0.

However, with the ECJ ruling, Euro-registrars have told ICANN that it would now be “illegal” to continue to use Iron Mountain.

In a recent letter (pdf) to ICANN, about 20 EU-based registrars said that non-European registrars would get a competitive advantage unless ICANN does something about it.

They want ICANN to start subsidizing one or more EU-based escrow agents, enabling them to switch without adding to costs.

the service fees of those [alternative] providers are not being supported by ICANN. Thus, the only solution for EU based registrars to comply with their local laws is to support this extra cost.

We are sure, you will agree this clearly constitutes an unfair disadvantage to a given category of a registrars.

This is why we ask ICANN to offer the same terms as it currently does to Iron Mountain to other RDE [Registrar Data Escrow] providers established in the European Economical Area to ensure a level playing field for registrars globally.

According to the registrars, they have until January to switch, so ICANN may have to move quickly to avoid unrest.