Three new gTLDs pass Extended Evaluation

Kevin Murphy, November 23, 2013, Domain Registries

ICANN still hasn’t polished off its backlog of new gTLD applications in Initial Evaluation, but three more passed Extended Evaluation this week.

Guangzhou YU Wei Information Technology passed EE on .佛山 (for Foshan, a Chinese city), Taipei City Government passed on its application for .taipei and MIH PayU passed for .payu.

The two Chinese-related applications had been held up by governmental approval. The application for .payu had failed IE due to its lack of financial statements.

Two applications remain in Initial Evaluation, 24 are in Extended Evaluation.

TLDH and others sign first gTLD registry contracts

Kevin Murphy, November 23, 2013, Domain Registries

Top Level Domain Holdings and a few other new gTLD registries signed their first Registry Agreements with ICANN this week.

Its six new RAs were among 15 registry contracts ICANN signed this week. TLDH and its subsidiaries signed for: .horse, .cooking, .nrw (as Minds + Machine GmbH), .casa, .fishing and .budapest.

I’d heard some concerns at ICANN 48 this week about TLDH’s lack of signed contracts to date, but the concerns seem to have been misplaced.

Monolith Registry, partly owned by Afilias, has also signed RAs for .voto and .vote, the latter of which was won at auction.

Small Chinese portfolio applicant Zodiac Holdings got its second and third gTLD contracts: .商城 (“.mall”) and .八卦 (“.gossip”).

German registry I-Registry got .rich and Russian registry The Foundation for Network Initiatives got .дети (“.kids/children”).

Previously contracted parties Donuts and Uniregistry added .tools and .expert (Donuts) and .christmas (Uniregistry) to their portfolios on Friday.

The total number of new gTLDs with RAs is now about 130.

GAC gives ICANN a way out on IGO acronyms

Kevin Murphy, November 22, 2013, Domain Policy

The ICANN Governmental Advisory Committee has reiterated its call for the protection of intergovernmental organization acronyms in the new gTLD program, but seems to have given ICANN a way to avoid a nasty confrontation.

In its official Communique from the just-concluded meeting in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the GAC provided the following advice concerning IGOs:

The GAC, together with IGOs, remains committed to continuing the dialogue with NGPC [ICANN's New gTLD Program Committee] on finalising the modalities for permanent protection of IGO acronyms at the second level, by putting in place a mechanism which would:

1. provide for a permanent system of notifications to both the potential registrant and the relevant IGO as to a possible conflict if a potential registrant seeks to register a domain name matching the acronym of that IGO;

2. allow the IGO a timely opportunity to effectively prevent potential misuse and confusion;

3. allow for a final and binding determination by an independent third party in order to resolve any disagreement between an IGO and a potential registrant; and

4. be at no cost or of a nominal cost only to the IGO.

This seems to be a departure from the GAC’s its Durban Communique, in which it had demanded “preventative” measures be put in place to stop third parties registering IGO acronyms.

As we reported earlier this week, the GNSO Council unanimously approved a resolution telling ICANN to remove IGO acronyms from existing block-lists, something the GAC had been demanding.

Now, it seems that ICANN has been given a relatively simple and less confrontational way of accepting the GAC’s watered-down advice.

The Trademark Claims alerts service and Uniform Rapid Suspension dispute resolution process combined would, by my reading, tick all four of the GAC’s boxes.

IGO acronyms do not currently qualify for either, because they’re not trademarks, but if ICANN can figure out a way to allow these strings into the Trademark Clearinghouse, it can probably give the GAC what it wants.

In my view, such a move wouldn’t trample on anyone else’s rights, it would not represent the kind of overkill the GAC originally wanted, nor would it be in conflict with the GNSO’s consensus resolution (which seems to envisage a future in which these acronyms get TMCH protection).

ICANN may have avoided the sticky situation I pondered earlier this week.

These are the top 50 name collisions

Kevin Murphy, November 19, 2013, Domain Tech

Having spent the last 36 hours crunching ICANN’s lists of almost 10 million new gTLD name collisions, the DI PRO collisions database is back online, and we can start reporting some interesting facts.

First, while we reported yesterday that 1,318 new gTLD applicants will be asked to block a total of 9.8 million unique domain names, the number of distinct second-level strings involved is somewhat smaller.

It’s 6,806,050, according to our calculations, still a bewilderingly high number.

The most commonly blocked string, as expected, is “www”. It’s on the block-lists for 1,195 gTLDs, over 90% of the total.

Second is “2010″. I currently have no explanation for this, but I’m wondering if it’s an artifact of the years of Day In The Life data upon which ICANN based its lists.

Protocol-related strings such as “wpad” and “isatap” also rank highly, as do strings matching popular TLDs such as “com”, “org”, “uk” and “de”. Single-character strings are also very popular.

The brand with the most blocks (free trademark protection?) is unsurprisingly Google.

The string “google” appears as an exact match on 930 gTLDs’ lists. It appears as a substring of 1,235 additional blocked strings, such as “google-toolbar” and “googlemaps”.

Facebook, Yahoo, Gmail, YouTube and Hotmail also feature in the top 100 blocked brands.

DI PRO subscribers can search for strings that interest them, discovering how many and which gTLDs they’re blocked in, using the database.

Here’s a table of the top 50 blocked strings.

StringgTLD Count
www1195
20101187
com1124
wpad1048
net1032
isatap1030
org1008
mail964
google930
ww911
uk908
info905
http901
de900
us897
co881
local872
edu865
cn839
a839
e837
ru836
m833
ca831
c826
it821
tv817
server817
in814
gov814
wwww810
f804
facebook803
br803
fr799
ftp796
au796
yahoo794
1784
w780
biz778
g776
forum776
my764
cc762
jp761
s758
images754
webmail753
p749

GACmail? Belgium denies .spa gTLD shakedown

Kevin Murphy, November 19, 2013, Domain Registries

The Belgian government has denied claims that the city of Spa tried to shake down new gTLD applicants for money in exchange for not objecting to their .spa applications.

The Belgian Governmental Advisory Committee representative said this afternoon that Belgium was “extremely unhappy” that the “disrespectful allusions” got an airing during a meeting with the ICANN board.

He was responding directly to a question asked during a Sunday session by ICANN director Chris Disspain, who, to be fair, didn’t name either the government or the gTLD. He had said:

I understand there is at least one application, possibly more, where a government or part a government is negotiating with the applicant in respect to receive a financial benefit from the applicant. I’m concerned about that and I wondered if the GAC had a view as to whether such matters were appropriate.

While nobody would talk on the record, asking around the ICANN 48 meeting here in Buenos Aires it became clear that Disspain was referring to Belgium and .spa.

It was not clear whether he was referring to Donuts or to Asia Spa and Wellness Promotion Council, which have both applied for the string.

The string “spa” was not protected by ICANN’s rules on geographic names, but the GAC in April advised ICANN not to approve the applications until governments had more time to reach a decision.

My inference from Disspain’s question was that Belgium was planning to press for a GAC objection to .spa unless its city got paid, which could be perceived as an abuse of power.

Nobody from the GAC answered the question on Sunday, but Belgium today denied that anything inappropriate was going on, saying Disspain’s assertion was “factually incorrect”.

There is a contract between Spa and an applicant, he confirmed, but he said that “no money will flow to the city of Spa”.

“A very small part of the profits of the registry will go to the community served by .spa,” he said.

This side-deal does not appear to be a public document, but the Belgian rep said that it has been circulated to GAC members for transparency purposes.

There are several applicants whose strings appeared on ICANN’s protected geo names list that have been required to get letters of non-objection from various countries.

Tata Group, for example, needed permission from Morocco for .tata, while TUI had to go to Burkina Faso for .tui. Both are the names of provinces in those countries.

It’s not publicly known how these letters of non-objection were obtained, and whether any financial benefit accrued to the government as a result.