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Donuts blames “license” problems for Chinese gTLD delays

Kevin Murphy, December 8, 2014, Domain Registries

Donuts says that problems obtaining “licenses” from the Chinese government are to blame for the fact that it is yet to launch any of its Chinese-script new gTLDs.

Currently, four of the company’s portfolio of 156 gTLDs are in Chinese. Three have been delegated to the DNS root but none of them have been launched.

The first, .游戏 (for “games”) has been in the root since October 2013, but does not yet have a firm date for Sunrise. Another, .商店 (“shop”), was delegated just last week, almost a year after Donuts signed its Registry Agreement with ICANN.

Donuts explained the .游戏 delay with the following statement:

The Chinese government division which handles this area is MIIT [Ministry of Industry and Information Technology] and in conjunction with [.cn registry] CNNIC they are still to advise of the licensing application process. We hope to make these TLDs available during the first half of 2015.

No additional details were available and it’s not clear what licenses Donuts — which is based in the United States — thinks it needs to obtain before launching.

I’ve heard rumors that China may introduce a licensing system in future, but other new gTLD registries with Chinese-script strings in their stable have managed to launch their gTLDs just fine without a Chinese government license.

TLD Registry — legally based in Dublin, Ireland, founded by Finns — launched .中文网 and .在线 earlier this year and has tens of thousands of names under management.

Thousands of those domains, which match Chinese geographic names, were allocated to Chinese government, however.

“No licenses are currently possible, because the new law is MIA,” TLD Registry chief marketing officer Simon Cousins told us.

Donuts wins five more new gTLD auctions

Kevin Murphy, December 3, 2014, Domain Registries

Donuts added five new gTLDs to its ever-growing portfolio this week, as the results of five private auctions were revealed.

The company won the following strings:

.news — went to Donuts after withdrawals from Merchant Law Group, Amazon, Radix, Uniregistry, Famous Four Media and Primer Nivel. As somebody with a vested interest in the news media, I’m glad this one went to a registry with an open registration policy.

.golf — Donuts beat Famous Four, Dot Golf and Fegistry.

.casino — Donuts won after withdrawals from Famous Four, Afilias and dotBeauty.

.school — Donuts beat Fegistry, Uniregistry and Minds + Machines.

.football — Donuts beat Famous Four.

The registry currently has 156 delegated TLDs, more than half of those it originally applied for. It has another 99 active applications in various stages of pre-delegation.

M+M raises $4.4m losing latest gTLD auctions

Kevin Murphy, December 3, 2014, Domain Registries

Minds + Machines made $4.4 million losing three recent new gTLD auctions, according to a company press release.

It’s withdrawn bids for .latino, .school and a third string it said it could not disclose due to the rules of the private auction.

M+M now says it has $45 million cash on hand.

So far, the company has withdrawn 31 new gTLD applications, almost half of its original 70. Not all of those were lost at auction.

It has 17 contested applications left and expects those contention sets to be resolved one way or the other by the end of June 2015.

Richemont pulls two dot-brand bids

Kevin Murphy, December 2, 2014, Domain Registries

Luxury goods company Richemont has withdrawn two of its original 14 new gTLD applications.

The company, which has been a vocal supporter of dot-brand gTLDs, pulled its bids for .netaporter and .mrporter this week.

Mr Porter and Net A Porter are fashion retail web sites for men and women respectively.

It’s not clear why these two bids have been withdrawn — the company isn’t commenting — but it’s certainly not a signal that Richemont is abandoning the new gTLD program completely.

The company has already entered into ICANN contracts for six dot-brands including .cartier, .montblanc and .chloe.

It has another five applications — four generics and one brand — that are still active: .手表 (“.watches”), .珠宝 (.jewelry), .watches, .jewelry and .jlc.

It has previously withdrawn an application for .love.

Where to find new gTLD dropping domain lists

Kevin Murphy, November 20, 2014, Domain Registries

With hundreds of thousands of currently blocked new gTLD domain names about to hit the market, many without premium pricing, some domain investors have been wondering where they can get hold of the lists of soon-to-be available names.

Fortunately, ICANN freely publishes several lists that could prove useful.

As we’ve been reporting this week, names that were previously reserved by new gTLD registries due to name collisions have started to become unblocked, as mandatory 90-day “controlled interruption” phases start to expire.

By definition, a name collision domain has received traffic in the past.

A CSV file containing a list of all domain names currently subject to CI can be downloaded from ICANN here.

Be warned, it’s a 68MB file with millions and millions of lines — your spreadsheet software may not be able to open it. It also changes regularly, so it could get bigger as more new gTLDs begin their CI programs.

The file shows the TLD, the second-level string, the date it went into CI and the number of days it has remained in that status. When the last number hits 90, the block is due to be lifted.

A second CSV file contains all the domains that have completed CI. Find it here. It’s currently almost 7MB, but it’s going to get a lot bigger rather quickly as domains move from one list to the other.

That file shows the TLD, the SLD, the date CI started and the day it ended.

Every domain name in that list is no longer subject to a mandatory ICANN block, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that the registry has unblocked it in practice. Some registries are planning to keep hold of the newly available domains and release them in batches at a later date.

Some gTLDs have chosen to wildcard their zones rather than implement a CI response on each individual name collision. In those cases, individual domain names will not show up in the current collisions file. Instead, you’ll see an asterisk.

In those cases, you can find a list of all of each gTLD’s name collisions in separate CSV files accompanying each TLD’s ICANN contract. The contracts can be found here. Click through to the TLD you’re interested in and download the “List of SLDs to Block” file.

Note that there’s a lot of absolute garbage domains in these files. The name collisions program ain’t pretty.