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PIR chief: registries should stop stressing about volume

Kevin Murphy, September 11, 2018, Domain Registries

Public Interest Registry has announced some sweeping changes to how it markets .org and its other TLDs, with interim CEO Jay Daley telling DI that there’s too much focus on volumes in the industry today.

PIR is scrapping is volume discount programs after the current batch of incentives expires at the end of the year.

These are the programs that offer rebates to registrars if they hit certain performance targets, all based around newly created domains.

“They particularly favor large registrars, and we don’t think that’s appropriate going forward,” Daley told DI yesterday.

He said that when PIR removed some developed markets from its geographically-targeted discount programs, it saw creates go down but revenue improve.

He suggested that some registries have too much focus on volumes as a benchmark of success, failing to take account of important factors such as renews and abuse rates.

Part of the problem is that success is often measured (by folk including yours truly) by domains under management, rather than TLD health or revenue-per-domain.

“How many people are simply trying to get their numbers up without worrying about the underlying revenue, or taking a very low underlying revenue in order to get their numbers up?” Daley said.

“We’re not in any way somebody who is trying to get our numbers up at all costs, certainly not,” he said.

Another marketing program getting a makeover is pay-per-placement, where PIR would pay for prominent positions in the TLD drop-down menu of registrars storefronts.

These relationships have been based purely on new creates, Daley said, with appropriate “clawback” provisions when registrations turn out to be predominantly abusive.

In future, PIR intends to take a “longer-term, hygiene oriented view” of how its marketing money is used, making better use of data, he said.

“We need to be looking more at the quality of the registrations we get, the level of technical abuse generated by those registrations, looking at the renewal rates that come from those registrations,” he said.

PIR has a new four-strong channel services team that will be leading these changes.

“We are a public interest organization and need to take a public interest view on everything we do,” Daley said. “We need to be looking at our promotions for more than just commercial reasons, we need to be looking at public interest reasons as well.”

Daley, who ran New Zealand’s .nz registry from 2009 until this January, said that the big changes he is overseeing do not reflect an attempt to put his stamp on PIR and take over the CEO office on a permanent basis.

He does not want to run a registry and does not want to relocate to PIR’s headquarters in Virginia, he said.

“I’ve been a registry CEO for nine years,” he said. “I’ve done this and it’s time for me to look at other things.”

He also sits on PIR’s board of directors.

Neustar swaps out CEO, PIR looking for new CEO

There are to be changes at the top at two of the industry’s stalwarts.

Neustar has announced that eight-year CEO Lisa Hook has stepped aside to be replaced by Charles Gottdiener, who comes from the world of private equity.

He was most recently COO and MD at Providence Equity Partners.

Hook, who became CEO in 2010, will remain on the Neustar board of directors.

Neustar, which manages .biz, .co and many dot-brand gTLDs, is now owned by private equity group Golden Gate Capital, with a minority ownership by Singapore-based investor GIC, following a $2.9 billion deal last year.

Meanwhile, Public Interest Registry has started advertising for a new CEO of its own, following the mysterious resignation of Brian Cute in May. PIR runs .org and related gTLDs.

PIR said its new boss will need “excellent organizational, strategic planning, financial management and diplomatic skills”.

If it sounds like you, you have a few days to get your application in.

Cute abruptly quits PIR

Brian Cute unexpectedly resigned as CEO of Public Interest Registry late last week. No reason was given for his departure.

In a May 10 press release, the .org registry said that he’d left May 7.

He’s been replaced temporarily by board member Jay Daley until a permanent replacement can be found.

I asked a PIR spokesperson the reasons for the resignation and was told yesterday: “Brian has chosen to move on to pursue new challenges.”

Hmm.

Cute, a Verisign and Afilias alum, had been with PIR for seven years.

PIR promotes two senior execs

Public Interest Registry has promoted two people in its senior finance team.

Marc Saitta, previously chief financial officer, is now chief operating officer, a position that appears to have been empty for a few years.

Saitta joined PIR as CFO in 2014.

Kathy King, who was senior director of finance and accounting, is now vice president of finance, the company said.

PIR, which runs .org and other non-profit gTLDs, said the promotions “represent our commitment to integrate and unify our operational teams to deliver more effective business and financial strategies on behalf of Public Interest Registry and its stakeholders.”

Both Saitta and King originally came from outside the domain industry, both having stints at the American Association for Motor Vehicle Administrators and Smithsonian Business Ventures.

Donuts took down 11 domains for Hollywood last year

Kevin Murphy, February 28, 2017, Domain Policy

Donuts caused 11 domain names in its new gTLD portfolio to be taken down in the first 12 months of its deal with the US movie industry.

The company disclosed yesterday that the Motion Picture Association of America requested the suspension of 12 domains under their bilateral “Trusted Notifier” agreement, which came into effect last February.

The news follows the decisions by Public Interest Registry and the Domain Name Association not to pursue a “Copyright ADRP” process that would have made such Trusted Notifier systems unnecessary.

Of the 12 alleged piracy domains, seven were suspended by the sponsoring registrar, one was addressed by the hosting provider, and Donuts terminated three at the registry level.

For the remaining domain, “questions arose about the nexus between the site’s operators and the content that warranted further investigation”, Donuts said.

“In the end, after consultation with the registrar and the registrant, we elected against further action,” it said.

Trusted Notifier is supposed to address only clear-cut cases of copyright infringement, where domains are being using solely to commit mass piracy. Donuts said:

Of the eleven on which action was taken, each represented a clear violation of law—the key tenet of a referral. In some cases, sites simply were mirrors of other sites that were subject to US legal action. All were clearly and solely dedicated to pervasive illegal streaming of television and movie content. In a reflection of the further damage these types of sites can impart on Internet users, malware was detected on one of the sites.

Donuts also dismissed claims that Trusted Notifier mechanisms represent a slippery slope that will ultimately grant censorship powers to Big Content.

The company said “a mere handful of names have been impacted, and only those that clearly were devoted to illegal activity. And to Donuts’ knowledge, in no case did the registrant contest the suspension or seek reinstatement of the domain.”

It is of course impossible to verify these statements, because Donuts does not publish the names of the domains affected by the program.

Trusted Notifier, which is also in place at competing portfolio registry Radix, was this week criticized in an academic paper from professor Annemarie Bridy of the University of Idaho College of Law and Stanford University.

The paper, “Notice and Takedown in the Domain Name System: ICANN’s Ambivalent Drift into Online Content Regulation”, she argues that while Trusted Notifier may not by an ICANN policy, the organization has nevertheless “abetted the development and implementation of a potentially large-scale program of privately ordered online content regulation”.