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Buy a $10k .club, get a free T-shirt

Kevin Murphy, December 13, 2016, Domain Registries

.CLUB Domains will today release 9,200 previously reserved .club names into the channel at premium prices.

Club T-ShirtThe registry is also offering free T-shirts to the first 500 people to purchase a premium name for $59.99 and more, personalized with said name.

While the names will become available at 1500 UTC today, the full list is not expected to be published until midnight UTC at landrush.club

CMO Jeff Sass gave the following list of examples of names to be released: watches.club, vino.club, ocean.club, elite.club, driving.club, comicbook.club, Chinese.club and gambling.club.

A thousand of the names are three-character strings.

The first-year prices are suggest at between $100 and $10,000 at the retail level, Sass said.

All premium names renew at standard-name pricing, he said.

The T-shirt offer requires the user to tweet using promotional hashtags and expires December 31.

Domains “worth $3 million” put up for first industry hackathon

Kevin Murphy, April 12, 2016, Domain Services

The domain name industry is about to get a new type of conference.

Domain broker Ryan Colby of Outcome Brokerage is to host what is believed to be the first domain “hackathon”, and says he already has domains he estimates as being worth $3 million submitted for the event.

Codemology, as the conference will be called, will be held over two days in Charlotte, North Carolina, in October.

The idea is to bring the owners of premium domain names together with angel investors and young, skilled developers, with the hope that some workable business ideas might emerge.

“We are trying to utilize the ‘excess capacity’ of premium domains in the marketplace, which are just sitting there doing nothing, oozing with potential, waiting for the next killer idea,” Colby told DI today.

Over the weekend of the event, the goal will be to create a bunch of “minimal viable products” for each selected domain that could be developed further.

It’s a free event, but attendees need to go through an application process before being given tickets. Colby said he’s marketing the event at university students and those who regularly attend hackathons.

The list of domains that will be used has not been finalized yet, but Colby’s clients have already submitted at least four pretty terrific one-word dictionary .coms.

Domains in new gTLDs will also make an appearance.

“If you’re a domain owner, why not submit it to the kid from MIT who might have a winning idea? There’s no risk, and huge upside if something comes about,” Colby said.

The developers keep the IP rights to whatever they code during the event, he said.

“It’s up to the domain owner to choose to collaborate, buy their IP or walk away,” he said.

Colby said he’s working on an app that will allow people to vote on domains that have been submitted, with the most popular ones being used at Codemology.

He said he’s hopeful of running similar events in other cities after the Charlotte conference.

Rightside offers $10 renewals on premium names

Rightside is to run a promotion that will discount renewals on premium names down to .com prices.

From May 16 to June 30, if you buy any of the domains that Rightside has marked as premium — except the super-premium “Platinum” names — the wholesale renewal fee will be just $10.

Registrars will mark this up according to their own pricing models.

Normally, the price you pay at the checkout is the price you pay every year after that.

The deal is overtly targeted at domainers.

Rightside said: “At these reduced prices, you’ll have more time to find the right buyer for any domains you register, and incur lower fees to transfer to them once you do. If you’re looking to add high-quality domains to your portfolio, this will be the time to do it.”

The reduced renewals only apply to names registered during the six-week window, but they do pass on to subsequent registrants if the domain is sold.

Rightside is calling it a “first-of-its-kind” promo, but in reality it’s just a temporary regression to the once-standard industry model.

Remember, prior to the 2012-round gTLDs, only exceptions like .tv charged premium rates for renewals.

Premium renewals are now very commonplace, but are by no means the rule, in the new gTLD industry.

For Rightside, the offer means the company may experience a brief cash windfall as domainers, who generally hate premium renewals, take a chance on the registry’s names.

There’s also a potential marketing benefit to be gained from having more domainers on board as unpaid salespeople.

But it does rather suggest the premiums are not flying off the shelves at the rate Rightside wants.

The company recently disclosed that in the first few months of the year it made revenue of $674,610 selling 1,820 premium names, leading to an average price of $372. Twelve five-figure names had been sold.

Over its portfolio of 39 gTLDs, Rightside has flagged over 964,000 as premium, or about 25,000 per TLD.

Dot London auctioning 50 registry-owned premium names

Kevin Murphy, July 13, 2015, Domain Sales

Dot London is to auction off 50 premium .london domains over the next two weeks.

The names are all currently registry-owned, and include the likes of dentist.london, flats.london and coffee.london. The full list can be viewed here.

The auctions are scheduled to end on July 30 and all have £100 ($155) starting bids.

According to the registry, it has sold over 3,000 names from its premium list since its launch last year. Some live examples include golf.london and catering.london.

The .london gTLD has a tad over 63,000 names in its zone file today.

ICM claws back 68 .porn names it accidentally released

ICM Registry has recovered nine .porn and .adult domain names from their registrants after they were accidentally released into the market.

Domains such as ads.porn, hosting.adult and buy.porn were among those snapped up by registrants, despite the fact that they were supposed to be registry-reserved.

ICM CEO Stuart Lawley told DI that a list of 68 .porn/.adult names (34 strings in each of the two gTLDs) have been brought back into the registry’s portfolio.

Only nine had been registered in the less than 24 hours the names were in the available pool, he said.

Lawley said it was his own personal fault for not sending the reserved list to back-end provider Afilias.

The affected registrants have been offered a domain from ICM’s premium list up to the value of $2,500 for each of the names ICM took back, he said.

Only one registrant has so far declined the offer, Lawley said.

Konstantinos Zournas of OnlineDomain, who broke the news about ads.porn yesterday, identifies this former registrant as “James” and reported that he is taking legal advice.

This is not the first time that a registry has accidentally released reserved names into the pool, where they were subsequently snapped up by domainers.

In January, .CLUB Domains accidentally sold credit.club, a name it had planned to keep on its premium reserved list for $200,000, for $10.99.

In that case, .CLUB honored the purchase after the buyer agreed to develop the site, scoring many brownie points in the domain investor community.

Both .CLUB and ICM have terms in their agreements allowing domains accidentally released to be recovered.

In ICM’s case, the names it accidentally released were not premiums, but rather domains that the registry plans to use as part of its own business — not to be sold at any price.

It used buy.xxx as a cornerstone of its .xxx marketing, for example, and it plans to use buy.porn and buy.adult for the exact same purpose.