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Whois privacy will soon be free for most domains

Kevin Murphy, March 5, 2018, Domain Policy

Enormous changes are coming to Whois that could mark the end of Whois privacy services this year.

ICANN has proposed a new Whois model that would anonymize the majority of domain name registrants’ personal data by default, only giving access to the data to certain certified entities such as the police.

The model, published on Friday and now open for comment, could change in some of the finer details but is likely being implemented already at many registries and registrars.

Gone will be the days when a Whois lookup reveals the name, email address, physical address and phone number of the domain’s owner.

After the model is implemented, Whois users will instead merely see the registrant’s state/province and country, organization (if they have one) and an anonymized, forwarding email address or web form for contact purposes.

Essentially, most Whois records will look very much like those currently hiding behind paid-for proxy/privacy services.

Technical data such as the registrar (and their abuse contact), registration and expiry dates, status code, name servers and DNSSEC information would still be displayed.

Registrants would have the right to opt in to having their full record displayed in the public Whois.

Anyone wanting to view the full record would have to be certified in advance and have their credentials stored in a centralized clearinghouse operated by or for ICANN.

The Governmental Advisory Committee would have a big hand in deciding who gets to be certified, but it would at first include law enforcement and other governmental agencies.

This would likely be expanded in future to include the likes of security professionals and intellectual property lawyers (still no word from ICANN how the legitimate interests of the media or domain investors will be addressed) but there could be a window in which these groups are hamstrung by a lack of access to thick records.

The proposed model is ICANN’s attempt to bring Whois policy, which is enforced in its contracts with registries and registrars, into line with GDPR, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation, which kicks in fully in May.

The model would apply to all gTLD domains where there is some connection to the European Economic Area.

If the registrar, registry, registrant or a third party processor such as an escrow agent is based in the EEA, they will have to comply with the new Whois model.

Depending on how registrars implement the model in practice (they have the option to apply it to all domains everywhere) this means that the majority of the world’s 188 million gTLD domains will probably be affected.

While GDPR applies to only personal data about actual people (as opposed to legal persons such as companies), the ICANN model makes no such distinction. Even domains owned by legal entities would have their records anonymized.

The rationale for this lack of nuance is that even domains owned by companies may contain personal information — about employees, presumably — in their Whois records.

Domains in ccTLDs with EEA connections will not be bound to the ICANN model, but will rather have to adopt it voluntarily or come up with their own ways to become GDPR compliant.

The two largest European ccTLDs — .uk and Germany’s .de, which between them account for something like 28 million domains — last week separately outlined their plans.

Nominet said that from May 25 it will no longer publish the name or contact information of .uk registrants in public Whois without their explicit consent. DENIC said something similar too.

Here’s a table of what would be shown in public Whois, should the proposed ICANN model be implemented.

Domain NameDisplay
Registry Domain IDDisplay
Registrar WHOIS ServerDisplay
Registrar URLDisplay
Updated DateDisplay
Creation DateDisplay
Registry Expiry DataDisplay
Registrar Registration Expiration DateDisplay
RegistrarDisplay
Registrar IANA IDDisplay
Registrar Abuse Contact EmailDisplay
Registrar Abuse Contact PhoneDisplay
ResellerDisplay
Domain StatusDisplay
Domain StatusDisplay
Domain StatusDisplay
Registry Registrant IDDo not display
Registrant NameDo not display
Registrant OrganizationDisplay
Registrant StreetDo not display
Registrant CityDo not display
Registrant State/ProvinceDisplay
Registrant Postal CodeDo not display
Registrant CountryDisplay
Registrant PhoneDo not display
Registrant Phone ExtDo not display
Registrant FaxDo not display
Registrant Fax ExtDo not display
Registrant EmailAnonymized email or web form
Registry Admin IDDo not display
Admin NameDo not display
Admin OrganizationDo not display
Admin StreetDo not display
Admin CityDo not display
Admin State/ProvinceDo not display
Admin Postal CodeDo not display
Admin CountryDo not display
Admin PhoneDo not display
Admin Phone ExtDo not display
Admin FaxDo not display
Admin Fax ExtDo not display
Admin EmailAnonymized email or web form
Registry Tech IDDo not display
Tech NameDo not display
Tech OrganizationDo not display
Tech StreetDo not display
Tech CityDo not display
Tech State/ProvinceDo not display
Tech Postal CodeDo not display
Tech CountryDo not display
Tech PhoneDo not display
Tech Phone ExtDo not display
Tech FaxDo not display
Tech Fax ExtDo not display
Tech EmailAnonymized email or web form
Name ServerDisplay
Name ServerDisplay
DNSSECDisplay
DNSSECDisplay
URL of ICANN Whois Inaccuracy Complaint FormDisplay
>>> Last update of WHOIS databaseDisplay

The proposal is open for comment, with ICANN CEO Goran Marby requesting emailed input before the ICANN 61 public meeting kicks off in Puerto Rico this weekend.

With just a couple of months left before the law, with its huge fines, kicks in, expect GDPR to be THE hot topic at this meeting.

Expect “minor inconveniences” in post-hurricane Puerto Rico

Kevin Murphy, December 12, 2017, Domain Policy

ICANN 61 is going ahead in Puerto Rico despite the continuing fallout of a devastating hurricane season, the organization has confirmed.

The March 10-15 meeting will take place at the convention center in San Juan, and participants can only expect “minor inconveniences”

ICANN said in a statement:

We recognize that Puerto Rico is still in the recovery phase, and while we can expect some minor inconveniences, the convention center and supporting hotels are fully operational and eager to host our event in March.

ICANN has not yet listed its official supporting hotels, where it usually negotiates bulk discounts, on the official ICANN 61 page.

In the event you, like me, always find ICANN’s approved hotels a tad on the pricey side, you’ll probably need to do your own research.

ICANN added that it has been working with the island’s governor and that: “We have been assured that our presence in San Juan will support economic recovery on the island.”

Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico on September 20, killing at least 48 people and causing billions of dollars in property damage.

The convention center venue for ICANN 61 escaped relatively unscathed and was actually used as a command and control center during the immediate aftermath of the disaster.

After Zika threat passes, ICANN confirms return to Puerto Rico

Kevin Murphy, December 16, 2016, Domain Policy

ICANN will hold its first public meeting of 2018 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, which was originally supposed to the venue for this October’s meeting.

ICANN moved ICANN 57 from San Juan to Hyderabad, India in May, at the height of the scare about the Zika virus.

Zika is spread by mosquitoes and sex and can cause horrible birth defects. An epidemic, beginning in 2015, saw thousands affected in the Americas and South-East Asia.

Puerto Rico was one of the affected regions. At the time of the ICANN postponement, numerous government travel warnings were in effect.

The World Health Organization announced last month that the epidemic is over.

It was always understood that Puerto Rico had been merely postponed rather than permanently canceled, and ICANN’s board of directors this week resolved to hold the March 2018 meeting — ICANN 61 — there.

ICANN diverts from Puerto Rico to India to avoid Zika

Kevin Murphy, May 17, 2016, Domain Policy

ICANN has confirmed that its 57th public meeting will not be held, as originally planned, in Puerto Rico.

Instead, it is asking community members to instead head to Hyderabad, India, this November.

Those Las Vegas rumors turned out not to be true. However, on the up-side, those Las Vegas rumors turned out not to be true!

The decision was to relocate made to the a “state of emergency” being declared in Puerto Rico due to the Zika virus.

Zika is spread by mosquitoes and male sexual partners and can cause devastating birth defects in kids.

Latest figures from the US Center for Disease Control put infections in US territories at 701, three of whom were travelers.

ICANN said in a blog post this evening:

This decision was based on available research and information and the fact that Puerto Rico has declared a state of emergency due to the ongoing Zika virus outbreak. We believe that the Zika virus poses a significant enough threat that we need to postpone going to Puerto Rico for the health and safety of our community and our ICANN team, just as we had to postpone ICANN52 and relocate from Marrakech to Singapore due to the Ebola virus outbreak in 2014.

It’s the second of this year’s meetings to be relocated due to Zika. June’s Panama meeting has been moved to Helsinki.

ICANN said that the new venue for ICANN 57, which takes place from November 3 to 9 this year, is the Hyderabad International Convention Centre.

It’s said that ICANN will take a seven-figure hit to its bank balance in order to cancel the PR meeting.

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