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ICANN enters talks to kill off Whois for good

Kevin Murphy, October 23, 2019, Domain Tech

Whois’ days are numbered.

ICANN is to soon enter talks with accredited registrars and contracted gTLD registries with the aim of naming a date to finally “sunset” the aging protocol.

It wants to negotiate amendments to the Registrar Accreditation Agreement and Registry Agreement with a view to replacing obligations to publish Whois with obligations to publish Registration Data Access Protocol data.

In letters to the chairs of its registrar and registry constituencies this week, ICANN CEO Göran Marby wrote:

The primary focus of the amendment is to incorporate contractual requirements for the Registration Data Access Protocol (RDAP) into the Registration Data Directory Services. This should include definition of the plan and provisions to sunset the obligations related to the WHOIS protocol as we transition Registration Data Services to RDAP.

For avoidance of doubt, people will still be able to look up the contact information for domain name owners after the change, but the data they see (very likely redacted for privacy reasons nowadays) will be delivered over a different protocol.

The contract amendment processes involve both registry and registrar constituencies to nominate a few people to engage in talks with ICANN negotiators, which is expected to conclude within 90 days.

When they come up with mutually acceptable language, the amendments will be open for both public comment and a vote of registries and registrars, before going to the ICANN board of directors for final approval.

The voting process is complex, designed to avoid capture by the largest registrars, and based on a balance of the number of voting registrars and the number of domains they collectively manage.

The contractual changes will come as no surprise to contracted parties, which have been on-notice for years that Whois is on its way out in favor of RDAP.

Most registrars already operate an RDAP server in parallel to their old Whois service, following an ICANN deadline in August.

We could be looking at the death of Whois within a year.

Whois killer deadline has passed. Did most registrars miss it?

Kevin Murphy, August 28, 2019, Domain Registrars

The deadline for registrars to implement the new Whois-killer RDAP protocol passed yesterday, but it’s possible most registrars did not hit the target.

ICANN told registrars in February (pdf) that they had six months to start making RDAP (Registration Data Access Protocol) services available.

RDAP is the replacement for the age-old Whois protocol, and provides virtually the same experience for the end user, enabling them to query domain ownership records.

It’s a bit more structured and flexible, however, enabling future services such as tiered, authenticated access.

Despite the August 26 deadline coming and going, ICANN records suggest that as many as three quarter of accredited registrars have not yet implemented RDAP.

The IANA department started publishing the base URLs for registrar RDAP servers recent.

According to this list, there are 2,454 currently accredited registrars, of which only 615 (about 25%) have an RDAP server.

But I’m not convinced this number is particularly useful.

First, just because a registrar’s RDAP server is not listed, does not mean it does not have one.

For example, the two largest registrars, Tucows and GoDaddy, do not have servers on the list, but both are known to have been working on RDAP services for a long time through public pilots or live services. Similarly, some CentralNic registrars have servers listed while others do not.

Second, of the 1,839 accreditations without servers, at least 1,200 are DropCatch.com shells, which tips the scales towards non-compliance considerably.

Still, it seems likely that some registrars did in fact miss their deadline. How stringently ICANN chooses to enforce this remains to be seen.

ICANN itself replaced its “Whois” service with a “Lookup” service last month.

According to Michele Neylon of the registrar Blacknight, contracted parties can also discover RDAP URLs via ICANN’s closed RADAR registrar information portal.

RDAP and Whois will run concurrently for a while before Whois takes its final bow and disappears forever.

ICANN dumps the “Whois” in new Whois tool

Kevin Murphy, July 31, 2019, Domain Tech

Of all the jargon regularly deployed in the domain name industry and ICANN community, “Whois” is probably the one requiring the least explanation.

It’s self-explanatory, historically doing exactly what it says on the tin. But it’s on its way out, to be replaced by the far less user-friendly “RDAP”.

The latest piece of evidence of this transition: ICANN has pushed its old Whois query tool aside in favor of a new, primarily RDAP-based service that no longer uses the word “Whois”.

RDAP is the Registration Data Access Protocol, the IETF’s standardized Whois replacement to which gTLD registries and registrars are contractually obliged to migrate their registrant data.

Thankfully, ICANN isn’t branding the service on this rather opaque acronym. Rather, it’s using the word “Lookup” instead.

The longstanding whois.icann.org web site has been deprecated, replaced with lookup.icann.org. Visitors to the old page will be bounced to the new one.

The old site looked like this:

Whois

The new site looks like this:

Whois

It’s pretty much useless for most domains, if you want to find out who actually owns them.

If you query a .com or .net domain, you’ll only receive Verisign’s “thin” output. This does not included any registrant information.

That’s unlike most commercial Whois services, which also ping the relevant registrar for the full thick record.

For non-Verisign gTLDs, ICANN will return the registry’s thick record, but it will be very likely be mostly redacted, as required under ICANN’s post-GDPR privacy policy.

While contracted parties are still transitioning away from Whois to RDAP, the ICANN tool will fail over to the old Whois output if it receives no RDAP data.

Under current ICANN Whois policy, registries and registrars have until August 26 to deploy RDAP services to run alongside their existing Whois services.

Registrars given six months to deploy Whois killer

Kevin Murphy, March 1, 2019, Domain Policy

ICANN has started the clock ticking on the mandatory industry-wide deployment of RDAP.

gTLD registries and registrars have until August 26 this year to roll out RDAP services, which will one day replace the age-old Whois spec, ICANN said this week.

Registration Data Access Protocol fulfills the same function as Whois, but it’s got better support for internationalization and, importantly given imminent work on Whois privacy, tiered access to data.

ICANN’s RDAP profile was created in conjunction with contracted parties and public comments. The registries and registrars knew it was coming and told ICANN this week that they’re happy for the 180-day implementation deadline to come into effect.

The profile basically specs out what registrars and registries have to show in their responses to Whois (or RDAP, if you’re being pedantic) queries.

It’s based on the current Temporary Specification for Whois, and will presumably have to be updated around May this year, when it is expected that the Temp Spec will be replaced by the spec created by the Whois EPDP.

Exclusive gang of 10 to work on making ICANN the Whois gatekeeper

Kevin Murphy, December 14, 2018, Domain Services

Ten people have been picked to work on a system that would see ICANN act as the gatekeeper for private Whois data.

The organization today announced the composition of what it’s calling the Technical Study Group on Access to Non-Public Registration Data, or TSG-RD.

As the name suggests, the group is tasked with designing a system that would see ICANN act as a centralized access point for Whois data that, in the GDPR era, is otherwise redacted from public view.

ICANN said such a system:

would place ICANN in the position of determining whether a third-party’s query for non-public registration data ought to be approved to proceed. If approved, ICANN would ask the appropriate registry or registrar to provide the requested data to ICANN, which in turn would provide it to the third party. If ICANN does not approve the request, the query would be denied. 

There’s no current ICANN policy saying that the organization should take on this role, but it’s one possible output of the current Expedited Policy Development Process on Whois, which is focusing on how to bring ICANN policy into compliance with GDPR.

The new group is not going to make the rules governing who can access private Whois data, it’s just to create the technical framework, using RDAP, that could be used to implement such rules.

The idea has been discussed for several months now, with varying degrees of support from contracted parties and the intellectual property community.

Registries and registrars have cautiously welcomed the notion of a central ICANN gateway for Whois data, because they think it might make ICANN the sole “data controller” under GDPR, reducing their own legal liability.

IP interests of course leap to support any idea that they think will give them access to data GDPR has denied them.

The new group, which is not a formal policy-making body in the usual ICANN framework, was hand-picked by Afilias CTO Ram Mohan, at the request of ICANN CEO Goran Marby.

As it’s a technical group, the IP crowd and other stakeholders don’t get a look-in. It’s geeks all the way down. Eight of the 10 are based in North America, the other two in the UK. All are male. A non-zero quantity of them have beards.

  • Benedict Addis, Registrar Of Last Resort.
  • Gavin Brown, CentralNic.
  • Jorge Cano, NIC Mexico.
  • Steve Crocker, former ICANN chair.
  • Scott Hollenbeck, Verisign.
  • Jody Kolker, GoDaddy.
  • Murray Kucherawy, Facebook.
  • Andy Newton, ARIN.
  • Tomofumi Okubo, DigiCert.

While the group is not open to all-comers, it’s not going to be secretive either. Its mailing list is available for public perusal here, and its archived teleconferences, which are due to happen for an hour every Tuesday, can be found here. The first meeting happened this week.

Unlike regular ICANN work, the new group hopes to get its work wrapped up fairly quickly, perhaps even producing an initial spec at the ICANN 64 meeting in Kobe, Japan, next March.

For ICANN, that’s Ludicrous Speed.