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Buy a $10k .club, get a free T-shirt

Kevin Murphy, December 13, 2016, Domain Registries

.CLUB Domains will today release 9,200 previously reserved .club names into the channel at premium prices.

Club T-ShirtThe registry is also offering free T-shirts to the first 500 people to purchase a premium name for $59.99 and more, personalized with said name.

While the names will become available at 1500 UTC today, the full list is not expected to be published until midnight UTC at landrush.club

CMO Jeff Sass gave the following list of examples of names to be released: watches.club, vino.club, ocean.club, elite.club, driving.club, comicbook.club, Chinese.club and gambling.club.

A thousand of the names are three-character strings.

The first-year prices are suggest at between $100 and $10,000 at the retail level, Sass said.

All premium names renew at standard-name pricing, he said.

The T-shirt offer requires the user to tweet using promotional hashtags and expires December 31.

After shaky start, .blog launches today

Kevin Murphy, November 21, 2016, Domain Registries

The new gTLD .blog goes into general availability today, after some mild controversy about the way the registry allocated reserved domain names.

Knock Knock Whois There, the registry affiliated with WordPress maker Automattic, last week apologized to some would-be customers for declining to honor some landrush pre-registrations.

Some registrants had complained that domains that were accepted for pre-registration were subsequently added to KKWT’s list of registry-reserved names, making them unavailable for registration.

KKWT said in a blog post Thursday that the confusion was due to it not having finalized its reserved list until just before its landrush period kicked off, November 2.

Registrars, including those accepting pre-registrations, were not given the final lists until the last minute.

Landrush applications cost around $250 but were refundable.

KKWT also revealed the make-up of its founders program domains, the 100-strong list of names it was allowed to allocate pre-sunrise.

The founders program currently seems to be a bit of a friends-and-family affair.

Of the 25 live founder sites currently listed, about 20 appear to be owned by the registry, its employees and close affiliates.

The registry said in its blog post that 25 super-generic domains had been given to WordPress.com. It seems the blog host will offer third-level names in these domains for free to its customers.

.blog had 1,743 domains in its zone file yesterday.

General availability starts about 30 minutes from the time this post was posted, at 1500 UTC. Prices are around the $30 mark.

ICM claws back 68 .porn names it accidentally released

ICM Registry has recovered nine .porn and .adult domain names from their registrants after they were accidentally released into the market.

Domains such as ads.porn, hosting.adult and buy.porn were among those snapped up by registrants, despite the fact that they were supposed to be registry-reserved.

ICM CEO Stuart Lawley told DI that a list of 68 .porn/.adult names (34 strings in each of the two gTLDs) have been brought back into the registry’s portfolio.

Only nine had been registered in the less than 24 hours the names were in the available pool, he said.

Lawley said it was his own personal fault for not sending the reserved list to back-end provider Afilias.

The affected registrants have been offered a domain from ICM’s premium list up to the value of $2,500 for each of the names ICM took back, he said.

Only one registrant has so far declined the offer, Lawley said.

Konstantinos Zournas of OnlineDomain, who broke the news about ads.porn yesterday, identifies this former registrant as “James” and reported that he is taking legal advice.

This is not the first time that a registry has accidentally released reserved names into the pool, where they were subsequently snapped up by domainers.

In January, .CLUB Domains accidentally sold credit.club, a name it had planned to keep on its premium reserved list for $200,000, for $10.99.

In that case, .CLUB honored the purchase after the buyer agreed to develop the site, scoring many brownie points in the domain investor community.

Both .CLUB and ICM have terms in their agreements allowing domains accidentally released to be recovered.

In ICM’s case, the names it accidentally released were not premiums, but rather domains that the registry plans to use as part of its own business — not to be sold at any price.

It used buy.xxx as a cornerstone of its .xxx marketing, for example, and it plans to use buy.porn and buy.adult for the exact same purpose.

AIDS.sucks at $1.5 million and other .sucks premium weirdness

The new .sucks gTLD has some interesting pricing for its reserved premium names. Notably aids.sucks, which currently carries a $1.5 million first-year fee at one registrar.

As far as I can tell, 101domain is the only registrar that is currently publishing its prices for .sucks premium names.

I had a bit of a play around with its web site, to see if I could discover which strings the registry has flagged as premium and which appear to be blocked by the registry.

aids.sucks was the most expensive domain I found, by some margin, at $1.5 million.

The presumably puts it within the pocketbook of, say, a pharmaceuticals company, but probably not a support group.

101domain confirmed that the published price was not an error and is based on the registry’s pricing, but said it was considering lowering it.

That price, and all the other prices cited in this article, are retail prices that would include the registrar’s mark-up.

The next-highest price I could find was $450,000 for sex.sucks.

The string “sex” is usually highly priced on registries’ reserved lists. It’s a slightly different story for .sucks, however, because registry policy states that all pornography is banned. The registrant would have to find a different use.

porn.sucks does not appear to carry a premium fee.

I could not find any other physical diseases carrying premium fees, and it seems that cancer.sucks is not available to register.

However, anxiety.sucks is $4,500, depression.sucks is $12,000, and suicide.sucks is available for $16,500.

It’s worth noting at this point that .sucks is not alone in putting premium prices on domains such as these — suicide.club and aids.club both carry $5,500 fees, for example.

Sports domains baseball.sucks, football.sucks, soccer.sucks, basketball.sucks and hockey.sucks all carry $75,000 fees.

On the vices: poker.sucks is also $75,000, gambling.sucks is $42,000, beer.sucks is $27,000 and alcohol.sucks is $4,500. Other strings, such as casino.sucks, do not appear to be premiums.

This patchy premium coverage goes for entertainment too. While television.sucks ($88,500) and music.sucks ($15,000) are premiums, internet.sucks and radio.sucks are not.

In relationships, gay.sucks is listed at $27,000 (lesbian.sucks does not appear to be premium) and dating.sucks is $15,000.

I tried a few common racial slurs and found them to be unavailable. Vox Pop has a policy against cyber-bullying, which may account for that.

racism.sucks costs $52,500, however.

Religious terms blocked?

Some religious terms are considered premium, while others are not available to register.

.sucks is currently in its sunrise period, so unavailable names have presumably been blocked by the registry for some reason.

I found that christianity.sucks carries a premium price tag of $75,000, while church.sucks is $30,000 and christian.sucks is $34,500.

catholic.sucks is not available, nor are jesus.sucks, christ.sucks and moses.sucks.

But catholicism.sucks, protestant.sucks, methodist.sucks baptist.sucks, can be bought for the regular reg fee.

hindu.sucks, hinduism.sucks, buddhist.sucks and buddhism.sucks are all for sale at the usual price.

judaism.sucks and jews.sucks are available at the regular reg fee, but jew.sucks is not available.

islam.sucks, muslim.sucks and muslims.sucks are not currently available. Nor is muhammed.sucks. But mohammed.sucks and muhammad.sucks are available.

I wonder what we can fairly infer from these apparent discrepancies.

Registry defensives?

As you might expect, the name of the registry is reserved — that happens in pretty much ever gTLD.

It remains to be seen whether Vox Pop will eat its own dog food and allow third-party criticism on its site.

It turns out johnberard.sucks (Vox Populi CEO) is not available. Neither are the names of Rob Hall, CEO of Vox Pop parent Momentous, and Uniregistry CEO Frank Schilling, who is involved in the TLD is some currently undisclosed capacity.

rob.sucks, john.sucks and frank.sucks are all not available to register.

As controls, I checked out other common male first names and the full names of other major registry/registrar CEOs and found them all available.

It will be interesting to see if any of these names are ever developed into criticism web sites by their owners.