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DI launches new gTLD application tracker with built-in string similarity checker

Kevin Murphy, June 15, 2012, Domain Tech

I’m excited to announce the launch of a comprehensive new gTLD application tracking service, featuring a unique built-in string similarity checker, right here on DI.

The service will provide the foundation for all of DI’s new gTLD program analysis over the coming months and years, and is designed to bring together all the best information about each application under one roof.

DI PRO subscribers can start playing with it now here.

All 1,930 applications can currently be searched and sorted by applicant, string, back-end registry provider, and status.

New gTLD application database

Users can also cross-reference applications in contention sets and read salient extracts from each application.

The gTLD application database will shortly be linked to the existing PROfile service, meaning DI PRO subscribers will have access to a database of over 3,000 domain name industry companies.

More features and bid-by-bid analysis will be added as the program progresses, but the feature I’m most excited about today is the string similarity checker, which is already built into every application profile.

This tool checks for visual and phonetic similarity with other applications, existing gTLDs and ccTLDs, as well as strings that are specially protected by the ICANN Applicant Guidebook.

Semantic similarity functionality will be added in the next few days.

Similarity is important for two reasons:

1) the String Similarity Panel, which will create new contention sets based on similar but not identical strings in a couple of months, and

2) the String Confusion Objection, which enables applicants to force rivals into the same contention set based on visual, aural or semantic similarity.

In testing, it’s already thrown up some possible future objections and contention sets that I had not previously considered, and early beta testers — applicants themselves — tell me they think it’s fantastic.

Here’s a screenshot from one of the .sex applications, to give you a taste.

New gTLD Database

Note that, unfortunately, the string similarity feature does not currently support the relatively small number of IDN string applications.

If you’re not already a DI PRO subscriber, you can sign up instantly here using PayPal. If you have any questions about the service, please email subs@domainincite.com.

As TAS closes, ICANN reveals new gTLD runway

Kevin Murphy, May 30, 2012, Domain Policy

ICANN has confirmed plans to open up the next phase of its new generic top-level domain program next week.

The controversial “digital archery” process, used to assign priority batches to applications, will begin June 8 and end June 28, according to a statement issued in the early hours of this morning.

That means digital archery will close the same day as ICANN’s public meeting in Prague ends.

The results of the batching will not be revealed until July 11.

And ICANN has confirmed that June 13 is indeed the date for the Big Reveal, when details of all the applications will be published for public perusal, as we reported Friday.

That would make June 12 or thereabouts the deadline for getting a full $185,000 refund.

Applicants have until a minute before midnight UTC tonight to finalize their applications if they have not done so already. Then, the TLD Application System closes for at least a few years.

Surprisingly, as many as a quarter of the anticipated 2,000+ applications were not yet complete as of last night, according to ICANN.

As of today, over 500 applications remain incomplete in TAS – either a complete application has not been submitted, and/or the full fee has not been paid. If you have not completed your application, we urge you to do so in TAS as quickly as possible.

Let’s hope the upgrades ICANN made to TAS are sufficient to handle a hammering today as so many applicants log in to the system.

New gTLD reveal day is probably June 13

ICANN is set to reveal its list of new generic top-level domain applications on or around June 13, according to several sources.

My understanding is that the date has not yet been set in stone – it could be a day or so either side – but that June 13 is the current target.

The unveiling of all 2,000+ applications is expected to be accompanied by a press conference and panel discussion in London, both of which will be webcast for those unable to attend in person.

Confirming the venue for this event is, I believe, one of the factors contributing to the current uncertainty about the date.

A June 13 date means that the “digital archery” batching process will – barring unforeseen circumstances – kick off at some point during the first two weeks of June and end after the reveal.

ICANN said earlier this week that the archery process will start before reveal day and will last for three weeks.