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Drop-catcher drops almost all remaining registrars

Kevin Murphy, April 23, 2018, Domain Registrars

Drop-catch specialist Pheenix has terminated almost all of its remaining registrar accreditations, leaving it with just its core registrar.

By my count, 50 shell registrars have terminated their ICANN contracts over the last few days, all of them part of the Pheenix dropnet.

Only Pheenix.com remains accredited.

That’s one registrar, down from a peak of about 500 at the end of 2016.

Almost 450 were terminated in November.

With registrars equating to connection time with the .com registry, it looks like Pheenix’s ability to catch dropping names through its own accreditations has been severely diminished.

By my count, ICANN currently has 2,495 accredited registrars, having terminated 524 and accredited about 40 since last July, when it said it expected to lose a net 750 over the coming 12 months.

Fifty registrars is worth a minimum of $200,000 in fixed annual fees to ICANN.

I just bought a new gTLD registry’s domain for $10

Kevin Murphy, April 18, 2018, Domain Registries

Are .fan and .fans the latest new gTLDs to go out of business? It certainly looks that way.

ICANN has hit the registry with a breach notice for unpaid dues and stripped it of its registrar accreditation.

In addition, its web sites no longer appear functional and I’ve just bought its official IANA-listed domain name for under $10.

Asiamix Digital is the Hong Kong-based company behind both TLDs, doing business as dotFans.

It launched .fans in September 2015, with retail pricing up around the $100 mark, but never actually got around to launching the singular variant, which it acquired (defensively?) from Rightside (now Donuts) earlier that year.

.fans had fewer than 1,400 domains in its zone file yesterday, down from a peak of around 1,500, while .fan had none.

dotFans in-house accredited registrar, Fan Domains, didn’t seem to actually sell any domains and it got terminated by ICANN (pdf) at the end of March for failing to provide basic registrar services.

And now it seems the registry itself has been labeled as a deadbeat by ICANN Compliance, which has filed a breach notice (pdf) alleging non-payment of registry fees.

While breach notices against TLD registries are not uncommon these days, I think this is the first one I’ve seen alleging non-payment and nothing else.

The notice claims that the registry’s legal contact’s email address is non-functional.

In addition, the domains nic.fans, nic.fan and dotfans.com all currently resolve to dead placeholder pages.

Meanwhile, dotfans.net, the company’s official domain name as listed in the IANA database now belongs to me, kinda.

It expired March 12, after which it was promptly placed into a GoDaddy expired domains auction. Where I just bought it for £6.98 ($9.92).

dotfans

To be clear, I do not currently control the domain. It’s still in post-expiration limbo and GoDaddy support tells me the original owner still has eight days left to reclaim it.

After that point, maybe I’ll start getting the registry’s hate mail from ICANN. Or perhaps not; it seems to have been using the .com equivalent for its formal communications.

Should .fan and .fans get acquired by another registry soon — which certainly seems possible — rest assured I’ll let the domain go for a modest sum.

Bling-maker kills off fifth dot-brand gTLD

Kevin Murphy, April 16, 2018, Domain Registries

Richemont, the company behind brands such as Cartier jewelry and Mont Blanc pens, has terminated its fifth dot-brand gTLD.

It filed with ICANN to terminate its registry contract for .iwc earlier this month.

IWC is a Swiss brand of expensive watches, but its dot-brand has never been used to any notable extent.

The company had registered the domain watches.iwc, which it apparently planned to use for URL redirection via Rebrandly.

It’s the third gTLD Richemont has voluntarily terminated, after .montblanc and .chloe last year.

The company also withdrew its unopposed applications for .netaporter and .mrporter back in 2014, before it actually signed contracts with ICANN.

Richemont was one of the more prolific dot-brand applicants, applying for 14 gTLDs in total back in 2012.

It also applied for (defensively?) and won the generic .watches and some translations.

While the .watches gTLD has been live in the DNS for two and a half years, Richemont has not yet set a launch date and has not yet said who will even be eligible to buy domains there.

Three more dot-brands throw in the towel

Kevin Murphy, March 21, 2018, Domain Registries

Two companies have told ICANN they no longer wish to operate some of their dot-brand gTLDs.

First, Sony has decided to junk its .xperia TLD.

Xperia is a brand of mobile phones the company sells. The matching gTLD, which entered the DNS root mid-2015, only ever had the contractually mandated nic.xperia delegated.

Sony still has .sony and .playstation active. The latter doesn’t seem to have any live web sites, but .sony is seeing some light usage with sites such as pro.sony and lostinmusic.sony.

The next dot-brand to get ditched is .meo, owned by leading Portuguese mobile telco MEO.

MEO has also dumped .sapo, which is its ISP brand.

Again, neither gTLD had never seen any action beyond their nic. sites, despite being delegated over three years ago.

Both companies told ICANN in January that they wish to end the Registry Agreement contracts.

ICANN last week decided not to open any of the strings for redelegation and opened up its decision for comments.

A new gTLD kills itself off for the second time

Kevin Murphy, January 18, 2018, Domain Registries

British pharmacy chain Boots has applied to ICANN to terminate its dot-brand contract for the second time.

The company asked for its .boots Registry Agreement, signed in 2015, to be ended in December and ICANN opened the request for public comment this week.

What’s weird about the request is that Boots had already asked for self-termination last April, but that request was subsequently withdrawn by the company.

Boots seems to have changed its mind, twice, in a year.

As I noted first time around, .boots was the first example of a dot-brand that also matches a generic class of goods to chose the easy way out.

It’s quite likely the two-year freeze on re-applying for the string, should anyone want to, will be over by the time the next new gTLD application window opens.

.boots only had the contractually mandated placeholder domain nic.boots live.