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Forty weddings and a funeral? .wed is dead but may come up for auction

Kevin Murphy, October 12, 2020, Domain Registries

.wed has become the first commercial, open, non-branded new gTLD to have its registry contract unilaterally terminated by ICANN, and it could soon be looking for a new home.

ICANN terminated the contract with US-based Atgron last week, almost three years after imposing emergency measures to protect registrants after the company’s business model failed miserably.

The company wanted to provide a space for engaged couples to promote their weddings for about $50 a year, but its business model was based around basically forcing registrants to abandon their names by charging a $30,000 renewal fee after year two.

Unsurprisingly, it attracted few registrants — about 300 at its 2016 peak — and only one registrar.

By the time the end of 2017 rolled around, it was languishing at 39 domains (for the purposes of a whimsical headline, let’s round it up to 40) and its agreement with its back-end registry operator was on the verge of expiring.

In the hope of keeping its customers’ domains working, Atgron turned off its Whois for a week, attracting the attention of ICANN and triggering a criterion for transitioning to an Emergency Back-End Registry Operator.

It’s been on an EBERO, in this case Nominet, since December 2017, with all domains essentially frozen.

In the meanwhile, it’s been fighting against contract termination with ICANN, first in mediation and then in arbitration.

Last month, the arbitrator ruled that Atgron was in breach for failure to pay its ICANN fees, and ICANN terminated the registry agreement October 5.

.wed is certainly not the first new gTLD to get terminated by ICANN — there’s been about a dozen to date — but it is the first to be a non-dot-brand.

This means ICANN will get to test its Registry Transition Process for the first time.

When a dot-brand dies, ICANN just removes it from the root and lets it stay dead on the grounds that there’s no plausible successor and no registrants will suffer.

In this case, we’re talking about an open, non-branded gTLD with a generic string that could potentially rack up many thousands of registrations.

There’d be no obligation for a future operator to take on the silly business model.

The Registry Transition Process will go one of two ways.

If Atgron has already picked a successor registry, ICANN will conduct a series of evaluations that look like they would be a piece of cake for any existing gTLD portfolio owner to pass.

But if Atgron has no heir apparent, it goes to an RFP which basically amounts to an auction, with the company prepared to pay Atgron the most money becoming the company’s presumed preferred successor.

With Atgron still owing ICANN money — presumably hundreds of thousands of dollars — in past-due fees, I’ve little doubt what ICANN’s preferred outcome would be.

For Atgron, there’s the distinct possibility that it could make more money from crashing .wed into the ground than it ever did by actually selling domains.

.wed is not a bad string — it’s short, meaningful, and has a niche of potential registrants already forced to overpay for almost everything else — and I’m fairly confident it could easily find a new home at an existing registry.

Dot-brand fizzles out after acquisition

Kevin Murphy, August 17, 2020, Domain Registries

Another dot-brand gTLD has decided to terminate its ICANN contract, but this time it’s because the brand itself has been discontinued.

.ceb was applied for by the Corporate Executive Board Company, a consulting company, in 2012.

But the company was acquired by Gartner in 2017, and the CEB brand was discontinued the following year.

For some reason it’s taken Gartner a couple of years to remember it has a gTLD it doesn’t need, and it’s told ICANN it no longer wishes to operate it.

The .ceb dot-brand was never used.

It’s the 81st dot-brand to self-terminate, the 12th this year.

.bible-thumping anti-porn registrar goes titsup

Kevin Murphy, August 5, 2020, Domain Registrars

An American registrar that prided itself on promoting .bible domain names and refusing to sell to pornographers has gone out of business.

PurityNames, which called itself “the only company that refuses to profit from pornography”, ceased operations July 27 and has had its accreditation agreement with ICANN voluntarily terminated.

In a notice on its web site, the company blamed its demise on “recent increases in regulatory requirements and costs as well as economic headwinds”.

Founded by seasoned ICANN policy expert Jim Prendergast, the company’s shutdown appears to have been handled the right way.

PurityNames’ small customer base has been transferred to 20-year-old Israeli registrar Domain The Net, and pre-paid hosting packages will be honored, according to the registrar.

The company was founded in 2011 in order to give registrants a “family-friendly” venue for registering names. It refused to deal with not only porn but also gambling and other “immoral” services.

It also actively promoted .bible domain names. Prendergast is an ICANN policy consultant for the .bible registry.

But apparently there was not much demand for either. As of March, PurityNames had 288 domain names under management, down from a 2015 peak of 536, and only 10 .bible registrations.

After Chapter 11 filing, JCPenney dumps its dot-brand

American retailer JCPenney has told ICANN it no longer wishes to own its dot-brand gTLD, .jcp.

The notice was filed just a month after the company entered Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and announced the permanent closure of hundreds of stores.

Like many retailers of non-essential goods, the company’s fortunes have been badly affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

I suspect the gTLD would have been scrapped eventually regardless — JCPenney never used it, and even the obligatory nic.jcp site merely redirects to the company’s primary .com.

It’s the 80th dot-brand to be dumped by its registry. the 11th this year.

$11 billion dot-brand blames coronavirus as it self-euthanizes

Another new gTLD you’ve never heard of and don’t care about has asked ICANN to terminate its registry contract, but it has a rather peculiar reason for doing so.

The registry is Shriram Capital, the financial services arm of a very rich Indian conglomerate, and the gTLD is .shriram.

In its termination notice, Shriram said: “Due to unprecedented Covid-19 effect on the business, we have no other option but to terminate the registry agreement with effect from 3lst March 2020.”

Weird because the letter was sent in May, and weird because Shriram Group reportedly had revenue of $11 billion in 2017. The carrying cost of a dot-brand isn’t that much.

Registries don’t actually need an excuse to terminate their contracts, so the spin from Shriram is a bit of a mystery.

Shriram had actually been using .shriram, with a handful of domains either redirecting to .com sites or actually hosting sites of their own.

It’s the 79th dot-brand to self-terminate. ICANN expects to lose 62 in the fiscal year that started three weeks ago.

First deadbeat dot-brand ripped from the root

ICANN has terminated a dot-brand gTLD contract for non-payment of fees for the first time.

The unlucky recipient of the termination notice is aigo, a privately held Chinese consumer electronics manufacturer.

ICANN first hit the company with a breach of contract notice in March 2018, noting its non-payment and a litany of other infractions.

The two parties have been in mediation and arbitration ever since, but the arbitrator found aigo was in fact in breach in late May.

ICANN issued its termination notice June 25 and IANA yanked .aigo from the DNS root servers a couple of days later.

While aigo is not the first dot-brand registry to be hit with a non-payment breach notice, it is the first to have it escalated all the way to involuntary termination.

Also recently, .intel and .metlife — run by the chipmaker and insurance company respectively — both decided to voluntarily their dot-brand registry agreements.

The total number of voluntary terminations is now 78.

More dot-brands dump their gTLDs

A further three new gTLDs have applied to ICANN for self-termination over the last few months, bringing the total to 76.

They’re all dot-brands: .sbs, .rightathome and .symantec.

The most recent application came from the Australian broadcaster SBS, for Special Broadcasting Service. This seems to be a case of a brand owner briefly experimenting with redirects to its .au domain, then deciding against it.

.symantec is biting the dust because the security company Symantec recently rebranded as NortonLifeLock Inc.

.rightathome also appears to be a case of a discontinued brand, in this case formerly used by consumer products firm SC Johnson.

Four more dot-brands join the gTLD deadpool

Kevin Murphy, April 21, 2020, Domain Registries

Four big-brand gTLDs have asked ICANN to terminate their contracts so far this year, bringing the total number of voluntarily discontinued strings to 73.

Notable among the terminations are two of the three remaining gTLDs being held by luxury goods maker Richemont, both of them Chinese-language generics.

It’s dumped .珠宝 (.xn--pbt977c) which is “.jewelry”, and .手表 (.xn--kpu716f) which is “.watches”.

The company, which applied for 14 gTLDs in the 2012 round, has already gotten rid of nine dot-brands. Only the English-language .watches remains of its former portfolio.

Also being terminated is .esurance, named for an American insurance provider owned by Allstate. This appears to be related to Allstate’s plan to discontinue the Esurance brand altogether this year.

There is still one .esurance domain active and listed in Google’s index: homeowners.esurance.

Allstate continues to own .allstate, which has a few active domains (which forward to its primary .com domain).

Finally, French reinsurance giant SCOR wants rid of .scor, which it has not been using.

Registrar terminated after what looks like domain hijacking

Kevin Murphy, January 10, 2020, Domain Registrars

ICANN has canned its first registrar of the year.

Los Angeles-based World Biz Domains will be going out of bizness after ICANN terminated its registrar contract earlier this week, following its non-responsiveness to what appears to be case of domain hijacking.

It’s a nothing registrar, with fewer than 100 domains under management, but it once had over 5,000.

The termination comes following the suspension I blogged about in October, which was related to the transfers to World Biz of 15 potentially valuable domains in late 2018.

The names were all either short numerics or the names of famous places in Singapore and Malaysia.

ICANN spent most of last year demanding records showing that the transfers were legit, but was ghosted.

World Biz allegedly also had failed to deliver Whois records in the proper format, and was behind on its ICANN accreditation fees.

The company will lose its accreditation officially on January 22.

Three more dot-brands fizzle out. Total now 69, dudes

Kevin Murphy, December 4, 2019, Domain Registries

Three more dot-brand registries have opted to kill off their own gTLDs, bringing the total to date to 69.

The three self-terminating gTLDs, which all informed ICANN of their intentions in October and November, are: .工行 (.xn--estv75g), .nadex and .vistaprint.

The .vistaprint termination is perhaps of note, given that online printing company Vistaprint was one of the bidders in the 2016 auction of .web, due to its application for .webs being ruled confusingly similar.

It wound up paying just a dollar for that gTLD, due to the complexity of the .web contention set, but even that appears to have been a defensive move.

Since then, Vistaprint has also terminated its .vista contract, and my records show that it has been “in contracting” with ICANN for .webs since August 2016. Clearly, it’s in no rush to ever actually use the thing.

Also noteworthy, .工行 becomes only the second internationalized domain name gTLD to self-terminate, after Walmart called it quits on its pre-delegation contract for .一号店.

.工行 was owned by the state-owned Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC), which by many measures is the largest bank in the world. It had revenue of over $105 billion last year, so whatever factors drove its decision to dump its dot-brand, cost was not one of them.

Finally, Nadex, an online stock-trading platform, evidently couldn’t find a use for .nadex, so it’s jumped ship too.

Hundreds of dot-brands remain, collectively managing thousands of domains and web sites.