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.email and two other new gTLDs go live

Kevin Murphy, January 2, 2014, Domain Registries

Three more new gTLDs were delegated this afternoon, including the potentially interesting .email.

The other two were TLD Registry’s .在线 (Chinese for ‘.online’) and United TLD/Rightside’s .immobilien (German for ‘.realestate’).

The reason I think .email could be interesting is that it’s very close to “.mail”, which has been highlighted in several analyses as a potentially dangerous due to the risk of name collisions.

It’s also, I think, one of the highlights of Donuts’ portfolio, despite the fact that the company was the only applicant.

.immobilien is the third delegated gTLD for United TLD. It’s going to be competing against the arguably more attractive .immo — a well-known abbreviation — which is currently contested by four applicants.

For TLD Registry, .在线 is the first delegation. It’s planning to take both .在线 and its companion .中文网 (“Chinese website”) to Sunrise on January 17, so we might expect another delegation soon.

Superstitious launch planned for Chinese gTLDs

Kevin Murphy, December 4, 2013, Domain Registries

TLD Registry plans to time its Chinese new gTLD launch dates to coincide with days considered lucky in Chinese astrology.

The Sunrise period for .在线 (“.online”) and .中文网 (“.chinesewebsite”) will start January 17 and end March 17.

According to the registry:

Both the start and end days of Sunrise fall on highly auspicious days for “starting new businesses” in the ancient Chinese almanac. The Chinese almanac was created during the Han Dynasty around 200BC, and continues to be an important guide to the lives and businesses of more than a billion Chinese people.

A landrush period will follow starting March 20, “an auspicious day for ‘breaking ground'”, and ending April 24.

TLD Registry will also run a live/online auction for “the most valuable and sought-after” names in Macau on March 21.

General availability is slated for April 28, “a highly auspicious date for ‘starting new businesses’ and ‘grand openings'”

It’s cute marketing, and no mistake.

The Chinese almanac, like all astrology, is of course utter nonsense.

Let’s Learn IDNs — .中文网 (Chinese Website)

Kevin Murphy, December 2, 2013, Domain Registries

Today, the belated first in an irregular series of articles devoted to making new IDN gTLDs more recognizable to the majority of DI readers who use the Latin alphabet in their native tongue.

Let’s Learn IDNs, as I said in my introduction to the series, won’t teach you Greek, but it will hopefully make it easier to instinctively know what a Greek IDN means when you see it.

I’m hoping this will prove very useful for everyone with an interest in the new gTLD program, bringing meaning to what otherwise would be an incomprehensible string of gibberish.

For the first lesson, we’re looking at TLD Registry‘s .中文网, which I guarantee after today you’ll never forget.

U-Label
.中文网

A-Label
.xn--fiq228c5hs

Translation
“.chinesewebsite”

Script
Chinese (Simplified)

Language(s)
Chinese. According to the registry, this includes “Mandarin, Cantonese, Hakka and over 250 other Chinese dialects.”

Transliteration
Zhōng Wén Wǎng

Pronunciation
Jong (rhymes with long)
When (as in “when are you arriving”)
Wong (rhymes with long)

How to Learn this IDN

In Chinese, each character generally represents a syllable and will often also have meaning as a word in its own right, which is the case with the three characters of .中文网.

Helpfully, these characters are also pictograms that pretty much explain themselves.

(Zhōng) is a line going through the middle of a box. It means “middle”. It’s also the first character of the Chinese word for “China” — 中国, which literally means “Middle Kingdom”.

(Wén) looks like a little writing desk with a quill on top. It means “language”. Combine it with 中 to get 中文, which means “Chinese Language”.

(Wǎng) looks like a net (or maybe a cobweb). It’s the Simplified Chinese word for “net”, which the Chinese also use to refer to the internet or web.

“Altogether, 中文网 as a gTLD string, is two words that make one common Chinese language expression: Chinese-language (中文) website (网),” said TLD Registry’s head of comms Simon Cousins.

Dead easy, right?

Certainly, since Cousins first explained this to me a few months ago, I’ve never failed to recognize .中文网 whenever I’ve seen it.

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