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Nominet takes down 32,000 domains for IP infringement

Kevin Murphy, November 21, 2018, Domain Registries

The number of .uk domains suspended by Nominet has doubled over the last year, almost entirely due to takedown requests concerning intellectual property.

The .uk registry said this week that it suspended 32,813 domains in the 12 months to October 31, up from 16,632 in the year-ago period.

It’s the fourth year in a row that the number of suspensions has more than doubled. In 2014, it was a paltry 948.

While Nominet has trusted notifier relationships with 10 law enforcement agencies, it’s the Police Intellectual Property Crimes Unit that is responsible for almost all of the takedown requests, 32,669 this year.

No court order or judicial review is required. Nominet simply carries out unspecified “administrative checks” then suspends the domain.

Only 114 domains did not make the cut this year, Nominet said, but that’s up considerably from 32 last year.

There’s an appeals mechanism that can be used by registrants to restore their domains, for example if they’ve removed the infringing content. It was used successfully 16 times in the year, up by one on last year.

The registry also reported that no domains were suspended due to its ban on incitement-to-rape domains, down from two last year, but that staff had to manually review 2,717 new registrations containing suspect strings.

Nominet to donate over $260,000 to Children In Need

Kevin Murphy, October 8, 2018, Domain Registries

UK ccTLD registry Nominet said today that it will donate £1 ($1.31) for every domain registered to the charity Children In Need.

The initiative, which runs from today until November 19, is being backed up with a £200,000 ($261,000) minimum donation commitment.

Every paid-for domain in .co.uk, .uk, .me.uk and .org.uk will count.

The .uk space typically has been doing about 125,000 to 130,000 new regs per month recently, across all subdomains and direct .uk, so we’re looking at a potentially substantial donation here.

The money raised will help fund technology-related youth projects across the UK, Nominet said.

Judging by today’s press release, non-profit Nominet is calling itself a “profit with a purpose” company nowadays.

Children In Need is a charity run by the BBC. It broadcasts a fundraising telethon every year, typically raising tens of millions of pounds.

This year’s show is being broadcast November 16.

Nominet to charge brands for no-name Whois access

Kevin Murphy, April 23, 2018, Domain Registries

Nominet has become the second major registry to announce that trademark lawyers will have to pay for Whois after the EU General Data Protection Regulation comes into effect next month.

The company said late last week that it will offer the intellectual property community two tiers of Whois access.

First, they can pay for a searchable Whois with a much more limited output.

Nominet said that “users of the existing Searchable WHOIS who are not law enforcement will continue to have access to the service on a charged-for basis however the registrant name and address will be redacted”.

Second, they can request the full Whois record (including historical data) for a specific domain and get a response within one business day for no charge.

Approved law enforcement agencies will continue to get unfettered access to both services — with “enhanced output” for the searchable Whois — for no charge, Nominet said.

These changes were decided upon following a month-long consultation which accepted comments from interested parties.

Other significant changes incoming include:

  • Scrapping UK-presence requirements for second-level registrations.
  • Doing away with the current privacy services framework, offloading GDPR liability to registrars providing such services.
  • Creating a standard opt-in mechanism for registrants who wish for their personal data to be disclosed in public Whois.

Nominet is the second registry I’m aware of to say it will charge brand owners for Whois access, after CoCCA 10 days ago.

CoCCA has since stated that it will sell IP owners a PDF containing the entire unredacted Whois history of a domain for $3, if they declare that they have a legitimate interest in the domain.

It also said they will be able to buy zone file access to the dozens of TLDs running on the CoCCA platform for $88 per TLD.

Cops tell Nominet to yank 16,000 domains, Nominet complies

Kevin Murphy, November 15, 2017, Domain Registries

Nominet suspended over 16,000 .uk domain names at the request of law enforcement agencies in the last year.

The registry yanked 16,632 domains in the 12 months to October 31, more than double the 8,049 it suspended in the year-earlier period.

The 2016 number was in turn more than double the 2015 number. The 2017 total is more than 16 times the number of suspended domains in 2014, the first year in which Nominet established this cozy relationship with the police.

The large majority of names — 13,616 — were suspended at the request of the Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit. Another 2,781 were taken down on the instruction of National Fraud Intelligence Bureau.

Nominet has over 12 million .uk domains under management, so 16,000 names is barely a blip on the radar overall.

But the fact that police can have domains taken down in .uk with barely any friction does not appear to be acting as a deterrent to bad actors when they choose their TLD.

The registry said that just 15 suspensions were reversed — which requires the consent of the reporting law enforcement agency — during the period. That’s basically flat on 2016.

“A suspension is reversed if the offending behavior has stopped and the enforcing agency has since confirmed that the suspension can be lifted,” the company said.

The company does not publish data on how many registrants requested a reversal and didn’t get one, nor does it publish any of the affected domains, so we have no way of knowing whether there’s any ambiguity or overreach in the types of domains the police more or less unilaterally have taken down.

It seems that the only reasons suspension requests do not result in suspensions are when domains have already been suspended or have already been transferred to an IP rights holder by court order. There were 32 of those in the last 12 months, half 2016 levels.

The separate, ludicrously onerous preemptive ban on domains that appear to encourage sexual violence resulted in just two suspensions in the last year, bringing the total new domains suspended under the rule since 2014 to just six.

Some poor bugger at Nominet had to trawl through 3,410 new registrations containing strings such as “rape” in 2017 to achieve that result, up from 2,407 last year.

Cybersquatting cases down in .uk

Kevin Murphy, June 23, 2017, Domain Policy

The number of cybersquatting complaints filed against .uk domains fell in 2016, according to data out this week from Nominet.

The .uk registry said that there were 703 complaints filed with its Dispute Resolution Service in the year, down from 728 in 2015.

However, the number of individual domains complained about appears to have increased, from 745 to 785. That’s partly due to registrants owning both .co.uk and .uk versions of the same name.

The number of cases that resulted in domains being transferred was 53%, the same as 2015, Nominet said.

The large majority of cases were filed by UK-based entities against UK-based registrants, the stats show.