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Credit card hack cost Web.com millions

Kevin Murphy, October 30, 2015, 11:10:27 (UTC), Domain Registrars

Web.com is taking a $1 million per-quarter hit to its revenue as a result of August’s hacking attack.

It also incurred $400,000 in consulting, legal and credit monitoring fees in the third quarter as a result of the breach, CEO David Brown told analysts last night.

Some 93,000 credit card numbers were stolen during the attack, a small portion of its 3.3 million customers.

A number of customers jumped ship as a result of the attack, moving their domains elsewhere, which increased Web.com’s churn rate.

“Due to the subscription nature of our business, in the fourth and subsequent quarters we expect the breach will have about a $1 million negative impact on revenue per quarter due to the shortfall from Q3,” Brown said.

It added 15,000 customers in the quarter, lower than the 21,000 it added in Q2.

Net income for the quarter was $6.1 million, reversing a $3.4 million loss in the year-ago period, on revenue that was basically flat at $136.8 million, compared to $137.4 million a year ago.

In response to an analyst question, Brown also commented on the success, or lack thereof, of the company’s new gTLD business. He said:

That continues to be positive, but we’re not doing back-flips here. It’s not that positive. We think it’s good for the market, good for consumers and businesses to have more choices. But they’re not flying off the table. .com and .net and the original extensions still are the force in the marketplace. But as we see more gTLDs and as the market understands them and see the opportunity, we continue to believe that this will be a positive trend. But at this point, it’s not moving the needle in our business or likely in anyone’s business.

Web.com owns registrars including Network Solutions and Register.com.

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Comments (1)

  1. Lest we forget, every registrar is a trove of credit card information, since ICANN requires every registrar – regardless of their security measures or lack thereof – to maintain complete transaction data for a period of at least two years, even if the customer discontinues transacting any business with the registrar.

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