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Another 44 new gTLDs pass Initial Evaluation

Kevin Murphy, April 26, 2013, 19:51:22 (UTC), Domain Registries

ICANN has posted its latest weekly batch of Initial Evaluation results for new gTLD applications, with 44 new passes and no failures.

The publication brings the grand total of passing applications to 213, with only one failure to date and 51 withdrawals.

Today’s passing strings are:

.微博 (Wei-bo), .慈善 (charity), .微博 (microblogging), .cimb, .wme ,broadway, .astrium, .associates, .coach, .aaa, .chase, .app, .trading, .nra, .vip, .engineer, .voyage, .yachts, .live, .cpa, .swiss, .auction, .emerck, .site, .godaddy, .epson, .pictures, .schaeffler, .omega, .dental, .hermes, .xin, .flowers, .qvc, .bofa, .email, .hotel, .scb, .cymru, .bridgestone, .dot, .talk, .cab, .guru.

Some notable things that immediately jump out at me:

  • Go Daddy’s application for the .godaddy dot-brand has passed.
  • The first application for .app — one of the most heavily contested strings — has passed.
  • So far none of the five Top Level Domain Holdings applications with Minds + Machines back-ends and priority numbers under 250 have passed.
  • Of the four Famous Four Media bids under 250, only one has passed.
  • Donuts is up to 29 passes, almost 10% of its total applications.
  • Amazon and Google have clean sheets so far.

ICANN is now at priority number 250 in its IE publication running order, which means 36 applications that could have passed already haven’t.

ICANN has previously stated that these delays are mostly due to processing responses to clarifying questions and change requests.

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Comments (10)

  1. Rubens Kuhl says:

    Not only passes from the recent draw numbers; first batches are seeing more TLDs that once were listed as “In IE” as “IE Complete – Result Pass” now.

  2. TM Trouble says:

    Who cares? All of the gtlds are doomed to fail anyways. Without owning the corresponding .com, no business person with 1/2 a brain would ever use one and no customer with 1/2 a brain would ever visit one. Waste of time. Waste of effort. Waste of money.

  3. MAK says:

    I generally don’t get involved in the .com vs other gTLDs debates because they tend to be speculative coversations by people attempting to exercise their prophetic ability. Rarely do people address the raw data that we actually have available to us.

    For example, go to Alexa.com and look up search.xxx. Click on the “Clickstream” tab. ICM is buying most of their traffic from chaturbate, so if you eliminate te purchased traffic, you’ll see that ICM’s number one source of traffic comes from http://www.xxx.

    Now, if you click on the “Audience” tab, you’ll see that the average search.xxx-user is aged 18-34–the internet-savy generation–the generation that supposedly understands how to use internet browsers and address bars.

    Whatever your hopes are for the future of the DNS, this data suggests that we have a lot of educating to do. So rather than arguing about whose prophecies will be realized, we might want to consider more constructive questions.

    • Rubens Kuhl says:

      There is something strange with the Alexa data. In the audience by country, the top 3 are:
      United States 17.5%
      China 8.9%
      India 8.2%

      Isn’t adult content blocked in China and .xxx altogether in India ?

      • Kevin Murphy says:

        I don’t think India blocks .xxx.

        As for Alexa data…

        According to TLD Health Check, .xxx has about 200 domains in the top one million most-visited. It’s small (the 104th most-popular TLD, just below .bz), but it’s about double the amount it had in August when we started tracking the data.

        It clearly takes a while for registrations to translate into eyeballs.

  4. MAK says:

    You’d be suprised where some adult traffic comes from. There was recently an article published about the amount of adult traffic that comes out of the vatican.

    I think the Chinese and Indian traffic is accurate, but it’s worthless to adult webmasters because it can’t be converted. No payment processor will handle that transaction because it is illegal.

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