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DomainTools scraps apps and APIs in war on spam

Kevin Murphy, January 22, 2018, 11:00:45 (UTC), Domain Services

DomainTools is to scrap at least five of its services as it tries to crack down spam.

It’s getting rids of its mobile apps, its APIs, and is to stop showing registrants’ personal information to unauthenticated users.

CEO Tim Chen told us in an email at the weekend:

The Android app is no longer supported.

The iOS app will no longer be supported after February 20th.

The Developer API is no longer supported.

On February 20th, the Bulk Parsed Whois tool available to Personal Members will no longer be supported.

On February 20th, our production Whois API will no longer be available to individual membership levels, an Enterprise relationships will be required.

It’s all part of an effort to make sure DomainTools services are not being abused by spammers, which has lead to a dispute with GoDaddy over bulk access to its registrants’ Whois data.

The longstanding problem of new registrants getting spammed with calls and emails offering web hosting and such has escalated over the last few years. Domain Name Wire detailed the scale of the abuse registrants can experience in a post last week.

While to my knowledge nobody has directly accused DomainTools of facilitating such abuse, the scrapped services are the ones that would be most useful to these spammers.

The company is also going to scale back what guest users can see when they do a Whois lookup, and is to make automated scraping of Whois records more difficult for paying members.

In a blog post, Chen wrote last week:

As of today, unauthenticated users of the DomainTools Whois Lookup tool will not see personally identifiable information for the registrant parsed out in the results, and will be required to submit a CAPTCHA to see the full raw domain name Whois record. Phone numbers in the parsed results have been replaced with image files, much the same way emails have always been rendered

As well as hoping to ease relations with GoDaddy — the source of a very heavy chunk of DomainTools’ data — the moves are also part of the company’s strategy for dealing with the incoming General Data Protection Regulation.

This is the EU law that gives registrants more control over the privacy of their personal data.

Chen told us earlier this month that DomainTools is keen to ensure its enterprise-level suite of security products, which he said are vital for security and intellectual property investigations, continue to operatie under the new regime.

About 80% of DomainTools’ revenue comes from its enterprise-level customers, over 500 companies.

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Comments (2)

  1. Jake says:

    Odd they’d kill some of these ‘to fight spammers’. If I were a spammer I’d have several ways to harvest emails, just signing up for Zone File access at large gTLD for instance.

    No one should kid themselves they are doing this because of GDRP.

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