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GoDaddy hack exposed a million customer passwords

Kevin Murphy, November 24, 2021, Domain Registrars

GoDaddy’s systems got hacked recently, exposing up to 1.2 million customer emails and passwords.

The attack started on September 6 and targeted Managed WordPress users, the company’s chief information security officer Demetrius Comes disclosed in a blog post and regulatory filing this week.

The compromised data included email addresses and customer numbers, the original WordPress admin password, the FTP and database user names and passwords, and some SSL private keys.

In cases where the compromised passwords were still in use, the company said it has reset those passwords and informed its customers. The breached SSL certs are being replaced.

GoDaddy discovered the hack November 17 and disclosed it November 22.

It sounds rather like the attack may have been a result of a phishing attack against a GoDaddy employee. The company said the attacker used a “compromised password” to infiltrate its WordPress provisioning system.

Comes wrote in his blog post:

We are sincerely sorry for this incident and the concern it causes for our customers. We, GoDaddy leadership and employees, take our responsibility to protect our customers’ data very seriously and never want to let them down. We will learn from this incident and are already taking steps to strengthen our provisioning system with additional layers of protection

You may recall that GoDaddy came under fire last December for punking its employees with a fake email promising an end-of-year bonus, which turned out to be an “insensitive” component of an anti-phishing training program.

About 500 staff reportedly failed the test.

Credit card hack cost Web.com millions

Kevin Murphy, October 30, 2015, Domain Registrars

Web.com is taking a $1 million per-quarter hit to its revenue as a result of August’s hacking attack.

It also incurred $400,000 in consulting, legal and credit monitoring fees in the third quarter as a result of the breach, CEO David Brown told analysts last night.

Some 93,000 credit card numbers were stolen during the attack, a small portion of its 3.3 million customers.

A number of customers jumped ship as a result of the attack, moving their domains elsewhere, which increased Web.com’s churn rate.

“Due to the subscription nature of our business, in the fourth and subsequent quarters we expect the breach will have about a $1 million negative impact on revenue per quarter due to the shortfall from Q3,” Brown said.

It added 15,000 customers in the quarter, lower than the 21,000 it added in Q2.

Net income for the quarter was $6.1 million, reversing a $3.4 million loss in the year-ago period, on revenue that was basically flat at $136.8 million, compared to $137.4 million a year ago.

In response to an analyst question, Brown also commented on the success, or lack thereof, of the company’s new gTLD business. He said:

That continues to be positive, but we’re not doing back-flips here. It’s not that positive. We think it’s good for the market, good for consumers and businesses to have more choices. But they’re not flying off the table. .com and .net and the original extensions still are the force in the marketplace. But as we see more gTLDs and as the market understands them and see the opportunity, we continue to believe that this will be a positive trend. But at this point, it’s not moving the needle in our business or likely in anyone’s business.

Web.com owns registrars including Network Solutions and Register.com.