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Second-level .ke domains go on sale this month

Kenya has become the latest ccTLD to jump on the second-level domain bandwagon.

From this month, registrants will be able to purchase example.ke, rather than having to select from third-level domains such as example.co.ke or example.or.ke, according to the registry.

KeNIC becomes the latest ccTLD registry to give customers the SLD option after the UK, New Zealand and Australia, which all backpedaled historic 3LD-only policies in order to remain relevant in an increasingly crowded TLD market.

Unlike previous launches, existing 3LD .ke registrants do not appear to have first right of refusal for the matching SLD, judging by the new policy (pdf).

The launch will begin July 23 with a 30-day sunrise period for trademark owners. This will be followed by a landrush period of 30 days.

Currently, pricing for co.ke domains in Kenyan shillings is in the same ballpark as the US dollar cost of a .com domain.

There are reportedly around 62,000 .ke domains currently registered.

Aussies get to drop the .com

Kevin Murphy, April 19, 2016, Domain Registries

Australia’s ccTLD manager has confirmed that local registrants will be able to register .au domains at the second level, eschewing the usual .com.

auDA said yesterday that its board has approved a plan that will let people register names such as example.au, rather than example.com.au or example.org.au.

The country follows the example of New Zealand and the UK, which have also started to permit second-level registrations in recent years.

auDA agreed with its policy committee that direct .au registrations would:

– make available domain names which are shorter, more appealing and more memorable

– give Australians more choice in deciding what domain name to register

– respond to market demand

– be more attractive to natural individuals than the current option, id.au

– strengthen the “.au brand” in a globally competitive market

– add value to all three main categories of users – registrars and resellers, registrants and ultimate users of the .au domain name system.

There’s no timeline yet on when 2LDs will become available, much less a policy on how potential conflicts will be handled, but auDA said it will provide updates later in the year.

Direct .au regs closer to reality

Kevin Murphy, August 20, 2015, Domain Registries

Australians could soon get the ability to register domain names directly under .au for the first time.

Following in the footsteps of the UK and New Zealand, a panel of .au policy body auDA has recommended that the second level should be opened up for registrations, pending further consultation.

In a consultation paper (pdf), the panel wrote:

direct registrations would create names which are shorter, more appealing and more memorable. They would make the domain name system simpler and easier to use. Moreover, the proposed change would open a wide range of new choices for registrants, and would provide a better option, especially for some groups; in particular, the Panel thinks that the biggest benefit will be for individuals, who would be able to obtain an Australian domain name in a simple and straightforward way.

Trademark owners need to pay attention, because the panel has recommended that the release does not include a sunrise period, due to .au’s “no hierarchy of rights” principle.

But the panel is recommending that existing .au registrants should get first dibs on matching second-level names.

Unlike the UK, where .co.uk registrants had preference over registrants in other SLDs, the auDA panel says .com.au owners would not be treated any differently to, for example, .org.au owners.

The panel has also raised the idea of implementing ICANN’s Uniform Rapid Suspension policy.

Registry providers might want to take note that the panel says that .au back-end AusRegistry, now part of Neustar, will not automatically get the contract to run the direct .au registry; an RFP may be in auDA’s future.

The recommendations are now open for comment until September 30.

Goodbye to .co? Nominet ponders releasing second-level .uk domains

Kevin Murphy, October 1, 2012, Domain Registries

Nominet wants to let UK companies register domain names directly under .uk for the first time.

The company today launched a major consultation, seeking industry and internet users’ input on a plan to open up the second level to verified British businesses.

Today’s it’s only possible to register .uk domains at the third level — .co.uk and .org.uk are the most popular suffixes. But if Nominet gets positive feedback, you’d be able to register example.uk instead.

Second-level domains would come with a few catches, however. Nominet says it wants to create a higher-security zone.

They’d be more expensive: £20 per year instead of £2.50.

Registrants would have to be based in the UK, with verifiable contact information, and domains would only start resolving post-verification.

DNSSEC might also be mandatory.

It’s expected that registrants would be prohibited from selling third-level domains in their zones. There could be large numbers of reserved names, such as the names of towns.

There might even be restrictions on which registrars can sell the names.

There are obviously no plans to get rid of .co.uk and the other public suffixes, but over time I can see a movement in that direction.

The exact rules will depend to an extent on the results of the consultation, which can be downloaded here. The deadline for responses is January 7.