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Domain universe grows almost 1% in 2017 despite new gTLD slump

Kevin Murphy, February 16, 2018, Domain Registries

The total number of registered domain names in all TLDs was up 0.9% in 2017, despite a third-quarter dip, according to the latest data compiled by Verisign.

The latest Domain Name Industry Brief, published yesterday, shows that there were 332.4 million domains registered at the end of the year.

That’s up by 1.7 million names (0.5%) on the third quarter and up 3.1 million names (0.9%) on 2016.

Growth is growth, but when you consider that 2015-2016 growth was 6.8%, under 1% appears feeble.

The drag factors in 2017 were of course the 2012-round new gTLDs and Verisign’s own .net, offset by increases in .com and ccTLDs.

New gTLD domains were 20.6 million at the end of the year, down by about 500,000 compared to the third quarter and five million names compared to 2016.

As a percentage of overall registrations, new gTLDs dropped from 7.8% at the end of 2016 to 6.2%.

The top 10 new gTLDs now account for under 50% of new gTLD regs for the first time.

The numbers were primarily affected by big declines in high-volume spaces such as .xyz, which caused the domain universe to actually shrink in Q3.

Verisign’s own .com fared better, as usual, with .net suffering a decline.

The year ended with 131.9 million .com names, up by five million names on the year, exactly offsetting the shrinkage in new gTLDs.

But .net ended up with 14.5 million names, a 800,000 drop on 2016.

In the ccTLD world, total regs were up 1.4 million (1%) quarterly and 3.4 million (2.4%) annually.

Excluding wild-card ccTLD .tk, which never deletes domains and for which data for 2017 was not available to Verisign, the growth was a more modest 0.7 million (0.5%) quarterly and 2.3 million (1.8%) annually.

The DNIB report for Q4 2017 can be downloaded here (pdf).

Donuts may make .travel names easier to buy after acquiring its first legacy gTLD

Kevin Murphy, February 14, 2018, Domain Registries

Donuts has added .travel to its swelling portfolio of gTLDs, under a deal with original registry Tralliance announced today.

It’s the company’s first acquisition of a legacy, pre-2012 gTLD, and the first “community” gTLD to join its stable of strings, which now stands at 239.

.travel went live in 2005, a part of ICANN’s 2003 round of “sponsored” TLD applications.

As a sponsored TLD, .travel has eligibility and authentication requirements, but executive vice president Jon Nevett told DI that Donuts will look at “tinkering with” the current process to make domains easier to buy.

The current system requires what amounts to basically a self-declaration that you belong to the travel community, he said, but you have to visit the registry’s web site to obtain an authentication code before a registrar will let you buy a .travel domain.

Given that the community captured by .travel is extremely broad — you could be somebody blogging about their vacations and qualify — it seems to be a barrier of limited usefulness.

Nevett said Donuts has no immediate plans to migrate the TLD away from the Neustar back-end upon which it currently sits.

The rest of its portfolio runs on its own in-house registry platform, and one imagines that .travel will wind up there one day.

While .travel is one of Donuts most-expensive domains — priced at $99 retail at its own Name.com registrar — Nevett said there are no plans to cut pricing as yet.

There may be discounts, he said, and possibly promotions involving bundling with other travel-related gTLDs in its portfolio.

Donuts already runs .city, .holiday, .flights, .cruises, .vacations and several other thematically synergistic name spaces.

.travel had about 18,000 domains registered at the last count, with EnCirca, Name.com, 101domain, Key-Systems and CSC Corporate as its top five registrars.

It peaked 10 years ago at just under 215,000 registrations, largely due to to speculative bulk registrations made by parties connected to the registry that were dumped a couple of years later.

It’s been at under 20,000 names for the last five years, shrinking by small amounts every year.

The price of the acquisition was not disclosed.

Why are you doing that Whois search? DENIC wants to know

Kevin Murphy, February 6, 2018, Domain Registries

In a taste of what might be coming under EU privacy legislation, DENIC wants you to jump through some new hoops before it lets you see Whois data.

When doing a Whois query on its web site today, the German ccTLD registry first asks you to answer the question: “How do you justify your legitimate interest in accessing the whois data?”

It’s a multiple-choice question, with an extra field for typing in your reasons for doing the query.

Possible answers include “because you think that the use of the domain raises a legal problem”, which appears to be for trademark lawyers, and “because you want to collect information about the domain holder for business purposes”, which appears to be for domainers.

Denic whois

There’s no wrong answer that will deny you access to the Whois record you want to see, but users are warned that their use of Whois data is only to be for “legitimate purposes”, under pain of legal action.

A DENIC spokesperson told DI that the new system was introduced today “for statistical reasons”

“Its aim is just to get a better idea of the DENIC whois usage pattern and of the extent to which different user groups are utilising the extended service,” she said.

The move should be viewed in the context of the incoming General Data Protection Regulation, an EU privacy law that becomes fully implemented in May this year.

While there’s been a lot of focus on how this will effect ICANN and its harem of contracted gTLDs, it’s easy to forget that it affects ccTLDs just as much.

By conducting this mandatory survey of real Whois users, DENIC will presumably be able to gather some useful data that will inform how it stays GDPR-compliant after May.

MMX profitable as acquisition talks drag on

Kevin Murphy, January 29, 2018, Domain Registries

New gTLD registry Minds + Machines became profitable as an operating company for the first time in 2017, the company announced on Friday.

MMX saw billings of $10 million in the second half of the year, compared to $5.6 million in the first half, as domains under management grew 67% to 1.32 million.

Billings is a measure of sales, rather than the more formal measure of revenue for accounting purposes.

Renewals accounted for $5.6 million of billings in the year, which “for the first-time has exceeded fixed operating costs which have been reduced to below $5.5 million for 2017”.

The company’s bottom line will also boosted by $2.1 million due to MMX losing the .inc and .llc new gTLD auctions.

MMX also provided an update on its “strategic review”, a code word for the “acquisition by or sale/merger of the Company” that it announced last May.

The company said “the longevity of the discussions has been at times frustrating” but that it hopes to have something to announce by the time it reports its formal 2017 results in April.

MMX had originally hoped to have concluded these talks before last September.

Emojis coming to another ccTLD

Kevin Murphy, January 24, 2018, Domain Registries

dotFM is to make emoji domain names available in the .fm ccTLD it manages.

The company said today that it’s currently taking expressions of interest in ‘premium’ emoji inventory, and that such domains will be registerable at an unspecified point in future.

It’s published a list of single-emoji domains it plans to sell.

Emoji domains “will be available based on Unicode Consortium Emoji Version 5.0 standards using single code point; and allowing a mix of letters and emoji characters under the top-level .FM, as well as the dotRadio extensions, .RADIO.fm and .RADIO.am”, dotFM said.

Very few TLDs allow emojis to be registered today.

The most prominent is .ws, which is Western Samoa’s ccTLD, marketed as an abbreviation for “web site”.

.fm is the ccTLD for Micronesia, but dotFM markets it to radio stations.

As ccTLDs, they’re not subject to ICANN rules that essentially ban them contractually in gTLDs.

Emojis use the same encoding as internationalized domain names, but do not feature in the IDN standards because they’re not used in real spoken languages.

Emoji domains are usually considered not entirely practical due to the inconsistent ways they can be rendered by applications.