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Neustar to auction .nyc premiums during New York Fashion Week

Kevin Murphy, January 27, 2017, Domain Registries

Neustar is to release a batch of reserved, fashion-related .nyc premium domains to coincide with next month’s New York Fashion Week.

Twenty-four names, including clothes.nyc, fashion.nyc, salon.nyc, models.nyc and shop.nyc will be released via an auction, the company said in a press release.

SnapNames will manage the auction at Auctions.nyc from February 1 to February 28. This period includes the duration of New York Fashion Week, which starts February 9.

It’s the second batch of premiums released by Neustar, which runs .nyc on behalf of the City of New York, after a real estate-themed auction in 2016.

That auction resulted in modestly priced sales including realestate.nyc ($21,300) and apartments.nyc ($16,155).

Now MMX kills off premium renewals

Kevin Murphy, January 23, 2017, Domain Registries

Are we witnessing the beginning of the end for the premium renewal business model?

MMX, aka Minds + Machines today became the latest new gTLD registry to announce it is getting rid of premium renewal fees for all of its premium domain names.

The price changes are retroactive to January 6 and affect all MMX gTLDs, such as .beer, .fishing and .horse.

“We started the process of rebooting our strategy in July last year, when we alerted our many registrar partners that 100% of our premium names sold after January 6th 2017 would have standard, GA [general availability] renewal prices,” CEO Toby Hall said in a statement.

MMX also said today that it is “revisting” its existing pricing tiers.

The reduced pricing will make the domains more attractive to domainers and end users alike, but I suspect the former will be more likely to exploit the new deal at first.

It’s the second new gTLD registry, after Rightside, to announce such a move this month.

Rightside said it was abolishing premium renewals on its expensive Platinum-level domains, though they will remain on more modestly priced premiums.

DropCatch spends millions to buy FIVE HUNDRED more registrars

Kevin Murphy, December 2, 2016, Domain Registrars

Domain drop-catching service DropCatch.com has added five hundred new registrar accreditations to its stable over the last few days.

The additions give the company a total accreditation count of at least 1,252, according to DI data.

That means about 43% of all ICANN-accredited registrars are now controlled by just one company.

DropCatch is owned by TurnCommerce, which is also parent of registrar NameBright and premium sales site HugeDomains.

Because gTLD registries rate-limit attempts to register names, drop-catchers such as DropCatch find a good way to increase their chances of registering expiring names is to own as many registrars as possible.

DropCatch is in an arms race here with Web.com, owner of SnapNames and half-owner of NameJet, which has about 500 registrars.

The new accreditations would have cost DropCatch $1.75 million in ICANN application fees alone. They will add $2 million a year to its running costs in terms of extra fixed fees.

That’s not counting the cost of creating 500 brand new LLC companies — named in the new batch DropCatch.com [number] LLC where the number ranges from 1046 to 1545 — each of which is there purely for the purpose of owning the accreditation.

In total, the company is now paying ICANN fixed annual fees in excess of $5 million, not counting its variable fees and per-transaction fees.

Because the ICANN variable fee is split evenly between all registrars (with some exceptions I don’t think apply to DropCatch), I believe the addition of 500 new registrars means all the other registrars will be paying less in variable fees.

There’s clearly money to be made in expiring names.

Famous Four VP goes solo, claims $400,000 sale

Kevin Murphy, September 22, 2016, Domain Services

Former Famous Four Media VP of sales Richard Downs has launched a new consultancy business aimed at new gTLD registry operators.

The new company, GTLD Systems is offering a multitude of services but is mainly a way for smaller registries to outsource their sales and marketing operations.

Downs told DI an early success was a recent $400,000 deal, selling a few FFM premiums (in .review and .download) to a single end user. He says he has a pipeline that he hopes will bring his total sales to $1 million before the end of the year.

He said he’s sold over $3 million in premiums over the last few years at FFM.

Spain-based Downs said that he has three employees, one a Chinese-speaker, in three different western-European countries.

Among the services on offer are premium list creation and sales, registrar channel management, Chinese regulatory approval consulting, supplier negotiations and marketing consulting.

Downs was with FFM for about three years. Before that, he was in digital recruitment.

Uniregistry to release 10 million domains on October 4

Kevin Murphy, September 20, 2016, Domain Registries

Uniregistry plans to release millions of registry-reserved domain names, many at standard registration fee, two weeks from now.

The company, which has about 25 new gTLDs in its stable, will release 10 million currently reserved names on October 4, CEO Frank Schilling told DI.

The revelation follows news that the company has started allowing thousands of registry-owned domains to expire and return to the available pool.

About 200,000 domains originally registered to North Sound Names, a separate Schilling-controlled company, are being made available via regular channels.

Those domains were registered (rather than reserved) so that Uniregistry could throw up landing pages inviting potential buyers to make offers. After they drop, they will no longer resolve.

But Schilling said a further 9.8 million names will also hit the market next month.

“It’s just a much better time because we have greater distribution and we are less likely to see all our names taken at land rush by one or two commercial registrants,” he said.

“We are unblocking and deleting 10 million domain names and making them available for registration through more than 200 registrars,” he said.

“Almost all will be standard reg [fee],” he said, when asked about pricing. Others will carry premium fees.

A web site publishing lists of newly released names will go live in about a week, he said.

DNW has previously reported that Uniregistry plans to release names that were initially blocked due to ICANN’s name collisions mitigation plan.

Those lists (which are usually mostly junk) are already published by ICANN and can be found accompanying the Registry Agreement for the relevant TLD linked from this page. Here’s the 35,000-name .link collisions list (.csv) for example.