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Registrar rapped for failing to transfer UDRP domain

Kevin Murphy, August 20, 2013, Domain Registrars

The domain name registrar Gal Comm has been warned by ICANN that it risks losing its accreditation for failing to transfer a cybersquatted name to Home Depot.

The compliance notice (pdf) concerns the domain name homedpeot.com, which was lost in a UDRP filed in early March and decided on April 21.

According to ICANN, Gal Comm, which has about 30,000 gTLD domains under management, failed to transfer the domain within 10 days of finding out about the decision, as required under the policy.

Whois records compiled by DomainTools show that the domain was instead deleted at in early April, and subsequently re-registered with a different registrar, where it’s currently under dubious-looking privacy.

According to the ICANN compliance notice, Gal Comm says that it deleted the domain because it received a Whois inaccuracy complaint about it.

Assuming that’s correct (and the Whois back in March was blatantly false) we have an interesting tension between policies that seems to have caused a slip-up at the registrar.

But registrars are supposed to lock domains they manage after they become aware of UDRP actions, so allowing the domain to delete seems to be a breach of the policy.

ICANN has given Gal Comm until September 10 to produce its records relating to the domain — and pay past-due accreditation fees — or face possible de-accreditation.

It’s very rare for ICANN to send compliance notices to registrars related to UDRP implementation.

Three more registrars get breach notices

ICANN has told three registrars that they’re in breach of their contracts and risk losing their accreditations.

Two of the companies in receipt of breach notices this week — Internet Solutions and DomainSnap — have no gTLD domains under management, but the other, Aregentinian registrar Dattatec, has over 90,000, making it the 112th-largest registrar.

The former two have simply not paid their fees, according to ICANN.

Dattatec, meanwhile, also stands accused of not adequately responding to Whois accuracy complaints on a handful of distinctly spammy-looking domain names in its care.

All three have been given until almost the end of the month to sort out the problems or face the possibility of termination.

Deadbeat registrar is also a massive new gTLD applicant

Kevin Murphy, April 24, 2013, Domain Registrars

One of the latest three registrars to receive ICANN contract breach notices is also a new gTLD applicant involved in four applications, a helpful reader has pointed out.

A. Telecom S.A., which owes ICANN $10,863.67 in unpaid accreditation fees and is facing a May 14 de-accreditation if it doesn’t pay up, doesn’t have any gTLD domains under management.

It is, however, part of the Brazilian wing of Telefonica, the Spanish telecommunications giant.

Telefonica Brasil SA has applied for .vivo while the corporate parent Telefonica SA is behind applications for .movistar, .telefonica and .terra. They’re all single-registrant dot-brand applications.

Telefonica had revenue of about $80 billion last year, and employs over 280,000 people, so I doubt a measly $10,000 would even cover its daily toilet paper bill.

I can only assume that its ICANN breach notice is a result of a paperwork problem.

Three registrars rapped for not paying ICANN fees

Kevin Murphy, April 24, 2013, Domain Registrars

ICANN has sent compliance notices to three registrars for allegedly not paying their dues.

Dotted Ventures, Basic Fusion and A. Telecom S.A owe a total of roughly $25,000 in unpaid ICANN fees, according to the notices.

Basic Fusion and A Telecom also didn’t notify ICANN about changes of address, according to the notices.

All three have until May 14 to pay up or risk losing their registrar accreditation.

None of them are of notable size in the gTLD space, with fewer than 1,000 domains under management between them.

ICANN terminates three registrars

Kevin Murphy, February 12, 2013, Domain Registrars

ICANN has pulled the plug on three accredited domain name registrars, saying they all failed to comply with an audit.

Lime Labs, R Lee Chambers Company (DomainsToBeSeen.com) and Central Registrar (Domainmonger.com) have been given 30 days notice that their accreditations are being yanked and that their domains will be transferred to other registrars.

About 12,000 domains will be affected, the vast majority of which are managed by Lime Labs.

The three registrars were among 10 that ICANN pounced on last month when they failed to respond to its Contractual Compliance Audit Program.

This program is a three-year initiative to make sure registrars and registries are complying with their contractual requirements. A third of registrars were randomly selected to take part late last year.

According to ICANN’s termination notices, all three registrars ignored last month’s warnings and did not submit the data required for the audit.

DomainsToBeSeen and Domainmonger both have just a few hundred gTLD domain names under management each. Lime Labs is much larger, with over 11,000.

The terminations will come into affect March 13.